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View Poll Results: Which mountain range is best
Cascades 12 34.29%
Olympics 0 0%
Appalachian 8 22.86%
Rockies 11 31.43%
Seirras 2 5.71%
Other 2 5.71%
Voters: 35. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 09-02-2013, 10:30 PM
 
39 posts, read 61,810 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by caphillsea77 View Post
So you obviously don't have a clue what you're talking about.
They are much more polite out East as well.
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Old 09-02-2013, 10:42 PM
 
9,972 posts, read 14,268,791 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ginger_Snap View Post
What Western Trail do people take months off of their life to hike in entirety?
Uh, the Pacific Crest Trail says hello...

Last edited by Deezus; 09-02-2013 at 11:44 PM..
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Old 09-02-2013, 10:54 PM
 
Location: New Mexico --> Northern Vermont in March
9,157 posts, read 17,703,765 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ginger_Snap View Post
They are much more polite out East as well.
I'm originally from back east, and I'm just telling it like it is. When something is posted that is so blatantly false then it needs to be called out and corrected; and that doesn't make a whole region and its people characterized as any more or less polite. That is all.
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Old 09-02-2013, 11:41 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX
654 posts, read 1,580,315 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ginger_Snap View Post
I never see posts from people who hike in the West. The Appalachian Mountains are a different story. There is a hiking culture linked to them. Small town economies are centered around biking and hiking in the East. I have been to parks/forests that are jammed packed with families on day trips. I've never seen any comments or articles about a similar lifestyle in the West.

It seems as though people in the West may take a walk every couple of years or ski down a mountain once in awhile, otherwise the mountains are there for aesthetic purposes only.
When I lived in Salt Lake City, I hiked on trails all over the Wasatch Front from Provo up to Bountiful. I was hardly alone. The trails are very popular.
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Old 09-03-2013, 11:06 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Western Massachusetts
45,881 posts, read 40,603,159 times
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The Olympics are pretty but aren't to the same scale and jaggedness as the grandest parts of the other 3 mountain ranges. Still an underrated western mountain range, IMO.
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Old 09-04-2013, 12:10 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
The Olympics are pretty but aren't to the same scale and jaggedness as the grandest parts of the other 3 mountain ranges. Still an underrated western mountain range, IMO.
The Olympics are still pretty impressive for what is essentially a fairly compact single range. And no other mountains in the lower 48 have such impressive high alpine features and glaciers so close to sea level and the coast. The peaks literally rise up just from the edge of Puget Sound. And as far as hiking and climbing they can be as tough as a lot of the Cascades or Sierras or Rockies considering the long access routes and very steep topography(some of the steepest hikes I've ever been on and many are just short of scrambles or technical climbs even on trail routes)...

https://ssl.panoramio.com/photo/69131567
https://ssl.panoramio.com/photo/2039919
https://ssl.panoramio.com/photo/93527585
https://ssl.panoramio.com/photo/3853863
https://ssl.panoramio.com/photo/8666247

On the other hand though, this poll is comparing giant continental mountain chains consisting of many ranges over many states like the Rockies and Appalachians to smaller individual ranges like the Olympics(or even the Sierra). The Rocky Mountains is a massive chain of mountains everything from the Sangre de Cristos and San Juans to the Grand Tetons and Canadian Rockies and stretching all the way up into the Yukon. There's more mountains in the ranges that consist the Rockies than one could explore in a lifetime, but you're talking about a huge mix of different ranges and they're not even really continous considering there's the large gap of South Pass in between the Southern Rockies of Colorado and New Mexico and the Central Rockies of Wyoming, Montana, Idaho and Alberta/BC.

Among the Cascades as well, the Northern Cascades are almost a separate and older non-volcanic range geological range that intersects with the younger volcanic Cascades. Geologically they don't have as much in common with the Southern Cascades that go all the way to the northern edge of the Sierra. And the northernmost Cascades intersect the Coast Range of coastal British Columbia, so there's a huge variety of scenery from north to south.

Personally though I love various parts of the Cascades(North Cascades especially but also many of the peaks in Oregon like the area around the Three Sisters/Broken Top), Sierra Nevada(especially the High Sierra area around the John Muir Trail) and many of the parts of the Rockies(everything from the San Juans in Colorado to the Beartooths in Montana and the Sawtooths in Idaho and Glacier National Park and Waterton right on the border). But there's a bunch of ranges I love that aren't even really part of these chains like the Wallowas in Oregon or the Trinity Alps and Marble Mountains in far northern California.

The North Cascades might be among the most spectacular I've seen in the US, though they're a pain to access in some parts(a lot of overgrown and washed out trails) and the weather can be crap--which are two elements that the Sierra and Rockies are somewhat better in regards to..
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Old 09-04-2013, 09:32 AM
 
605 posts, read 1,202,652 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ginger_Snap View Post
I never see posts from people who hike in the West. The Appalachian Mountains are a different story. There is a hiking culture linked to them. Small town economies are centered around biking and hiking in the East. I have been to parks/forests that are jammed packed with families on day trips. I've never seen any comments or articles about a similar lifestyle in the West.

It seems as though people in the West may take a walk every couple of years or ski down a mountain once in awhile, otherwise the mountains are there for aesthetic purposes only.

I don't think that is true at all. If you look at the vast majority of well known alpinist in the world, they come from western states. Mainly California, Washington, and Colorado.

Most of the well known Himalayan climbers are from the Seattle area. That being said (as someone who actually climbs and skis) the Cascades of Washington, the Sierras of California, and the Northern Rockies are probably the best ranges in the lower 48.

I think the Appalachians are pretty, but they are just not on the same scale as the western ranges.
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Old 09-04-2013, 11:16 AM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
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This is tough for me. Love them all but the have a tough time picking between the cascades and sierras.
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Old 09-04-2013, 06:24 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Western Massachusetts
45,881 posts, read 40,603,159 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Deezus View Post
The Olympics are still pretty impressive for what is essentially a fairly compact single range. And no other mountains in the lower 48 have such impressive high alpine features and glaciers so close to sea level and the coast. The peaks literally rise up just from the edge of Puget Sound. And as far as hiking and climbing they can be as tough as a lot of the Cascades or Sierras or Rockies considering the long access routes and very steep topography(some of the steepest hikes I've ever been on and many are just short of scrambles or technical climbs even on trail routes)...
Agree the Olympics are impressive, I just don't think they're the same class as the other three mountain range. And thinking about what you said, a rather unique setting right against the coast. Access to the interior of the range is rather difficult, a big contrast to how close it is to Seattle.

The Manyard Burn Trail is memorably steep, one of the few out west I've done that compares to New Hampshire trail (gains 2600 feet in 1.8 miles). Here's a few photos I took at the top:











Quote:
Among the Cascades as well, the Northern Cascades are almost a separate and older non-volcanic range geological range that intersects with the younger volcanic Cascades. Geologically they don't have as much in common with the Southern Cascades that go all the way to the northern edge of the Sierra. And the northernmost Cascades intersect the Coast Range of coastal British Columbia, so there's a huge variety of scenery from north to south.

Personally though I love various parts of the Cascades(North Cascades especially but also many of the peaks in Oregon like the area around the Three Sisters/Broken Top), Sierra Nevada(especially the High Sierra area around the John Muir Trail) and many of the parts of the Rockies(everything from the San Juans in Colorado to the Beartooths in Montana and the Sawtooths in Idaho and Glacier National Park and Waterton right on the border). But there's a bunch of ranges I love that aren't even really part of these chains like the Wallowas in Oregon or the Trinity Alps and Marble Mountains in far northern California.

The North Cascades might be among the most spectacular I've seen in the US, though they're a pain to access in some parts(a lot of overgrown and washed out trails) and the weather can be crap--which are two elements that the Sierra and Rockies are somewhat better in regards to..
From what I've seen, I found the southern Cascades less interesting, excluding the isolated volcanoes, than the Olympics. The north Cascades were impressive than the Olympics but different than the Olympics, which had their own beauty. The Olympics are probably as impressive as most of the Rockies except for the "best" parts of the Rockies. I liked the Trinity Alps better than the southern Cascades, too, and maybe they could be comparable to many parts of the Rockies (not sure). I liked the vegetation mix of the Trinity Alps, quickly changing in a short distance, often lush but the dry summers gave it a more open forest.
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Old 09-05-2013, 02:02 AM
 
Location: Pacific NW
6,415 posts, read 10,182,283 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ginger_Snap View Post
I have been out West. The culture isn't the same. What Western Trail do people take months off of their life to hike in entirety?

Rock climbing is very popular in the Appalachians and on the plateaus.
Yeah, there is the Pacific Coast Trail and the Continental Divide Trail. And unlike the Appalachian, those both go the full length of the country.

If you're interested in people and their trips on the trails ... this website has a nice collection of diaries and photos, organized by the different trails in the country.

As for the original question ... even though I'm a west coast person, I'd have to go with the Rockies. Just because they're longer than the Cascades.
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