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View Poll Results: Which mountain range is best
Cascades 12 34.29%
Olympics 0 0%
Appalachian 8 22.86%
Rockies 11 31.43%
Seirras 2 5.71%
Other 2 5.71%
Voters: 35. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 09-06-2013, 11:42 PM
 
Location: The Valley of the Sun
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IMO the Cascades are the prettiest. I think you can barely call the Ozarks and Blue Ridge in NC mountains, closer to large hills. I was however, surprised at the sense of presence I got while driving through the mountains in Vermont, particularly Mt. Washington. Those mountains were much bigger than I expected them to be though still not like the rockies or the cascades.

Last edited by Scottay; 09-06-2013 at 11:53 PM..
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Old 09-06-2013, 11:49 PM
 
Location: The Valley of the Sun
1,481 posts, read 2,203,969 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ginger_Snap View Post
It seems as though people in the West may take a walk every couple of years or ski down a mountain once in awhile, otherwise the mountains are there for aesthetic purposes only.
You're out of your head and/or quite obviously trolling. The mountain trails around Phoenix and San Diego are so jammed packed with hikers I'm constantly having to stop while mountain biking to let hikers have the right of way, particularly in the winter when hiker traffic is the heaviest. I'm pretty sure the ranges near Albuquerque, CO Springs and Denver are the same way.
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Old 05-26-2014, 10:53 AM
 
Location: Outside of Chicago
4,607 posts, read 3,845,213 times
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Reviving an old post…

First and foremost, the various ranges of Alaska and the Yukon are the best in North America by a wide margin. They are high, glaciated, have a terrible weather, are extremely tough to get to, and even tougher to summit. Outside of the Himalayas and High Andes, these ranges are the toughest to climb in the world. I call all three of these areas the big boy mountains.

In the lower 48 the Rockies are the best because of their massive size in terms of area and the diversity that brings. The Canadian Rockies are like the Cascades. The northern American Rockies (Idaho, Montana, and Wyoming) are also like the Cascades in the northern most areas, and as you go south more like the Olympic and Oregon Coastal Range on steroids i.e. higher and colder. The Rockies of Utah and New Mexico are similar to the Sierras sans the massive amounts of snow and 14ers. Colorado is an animal on another level with a huge amount of peaks and routes.

For Colorado specifically, the peaks for the casual hiker off of I-70 and in the east side of RMNP are scoffed at by Cascade and Sierra lovers because of easy access and easy/short approaches, and are avoidable in season because of the high quantity of foot traffic, but step away from these tourist areas and there are a lot of peaks that are very tough to access and summit in the vast Colorado backcountry.
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Old 10-17-2014, 03:44 PM
 
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I grew up in the Rockies and was a bit snobbish about them when I was younger. I have to say now, though, that it's both/and. They're just so different - apples and oranges. The hikes available to most average folks (with jobs, kids and spare tires) may well be less rugged than the average Appalachian hike. The Rockies certainly have some rugged trails, but they are often less accessible to the average hiker. Truly getting into the back-country around here is very different than it is in the Appalachians. Often just getting to the back country takes a couple of days hiking. The Rockies are cold, spare, dry & sparsely populated. The higher altitude means much less available oxygen, harsher sunlight & more extreme temperature variations. In any given group of people around here, there is a subset of uber-fit, super tough people whose lives revolve around planning and executing these expeditions, but the rest of us stick somewhat closer to home. And the Rocky Mountain Region is BIG - often folks from the East don’t really understand how much farther apart everything is out here - and the parks are bigger too. Most of the largest National Parks in the country are in the West. The National parks and forests are pretty packed near the entrances. Yellowstone and Yosemite have to take measures to keep visitors down. On any Sunday evening of the year, I-70 in Colorado is gridlocked from the sheer number of people trying to get back to Denver from the Mountains. So, yes, we hike. A lot.

The Appalachians, on the other hand are almost unfathomably old and you feel it. Having recently spent a little time in the Smokey and Blue Ridge Mountains, I was impressed that the trails were so rugged. I’m in average condition for a woman of a certain age & I felt like Super-Woman hiking there, because I *live* close to 6000 feet, so there was a lot more oxygen in the air than I’m used to. Hiking those same trails around here would have really worn me out. Where the Rockies are desert, much of the Appalachians, particularly in the South, is temperate rain forest. It is a lush, beautiful Garden of Eden and the light seems soft, less harsh, than that of the Rockies. One of the other differences that struck me was being able to clearly see where the Smokies started from the mountains of Northern Georgia and the same viewing the Blue Ridge from the Smokies. I can’t ever remember seeing the sub-ranges in the Rockies in quite that way. The views are spectacular and prospect definitely changes, but I’ve never seen the transition from one region to another until I was already in it. I liked having the mountains and parks so accessible and seeing how people live in, with and as part of the mountains, instead of separate from them. The two ranges are so very different, that I think I would be poorer for picking one over the other. To me they are Artemis & Aphrodite. I look forward to exploring the other mountains as well.
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Old 10-17-2014, 04:11 PM
 
Location: Who Cares, USA
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Cascades for me. By a long shot.
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Old 10-17-2014, 08:22 PM
 
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Rockies for me. There is NOTHING in the lower 48 that can match Telluride and Ouray! Nothing even close!!!!!
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Old 01-15-2015, 06:52 PM
 
1 posts, read 1,484 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scottay View Post
IMO the Cascades are the prettiest. I think you can barely call the Ozarks and Blue Ridge in NC mountains, closer to large hills. I was however, surprised at the sense of presence I got while driving through the mountains in Vermont, particularly Mt. Washington. Those mountains were much bigger than I expected them to be though still not like the rockies or the cascades.
The Blue Ridge mountains are mainly in Virginia, running slightly into North Carolina, where we have several named ranges within the greater Appalachian range. The Smoky mountains are hardly "large hills". They include several of the tallest peaks east of the Rockies. They are high and rugged and beautiful. Have you actually been in the midst of the Smokies on the NC/TN border? Not hills....
Of course there are no 14er's or gorgeous glaciers, but they are without a doubt real mountains.
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Old 01-15-2015, 07:33 PM
 
5,818 posts, read 10,519,622 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ginger_Snap View Post
I never see posts from people who hike in the East. The Western Mountains are a different story. There is a hiking culture linked to them. Small town economies are centered around biking and hiking in the West. I have been to parks/forests that are jammed packed with families on day trips. I've never seen any comments or articles about a similar lifestyle in the East.

It seems as though people in the East may take a walk every couple of years or ski down a mountain once in awhile, otherwise the mountains are there for aesthetic purposes only.
There fixed it.
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Old 01-15-2015, 09:19 PM
 
1,462 posts, read 1,542,791 times
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lol that original post had to be a joke, I'm hoping with fingers crossed n everything..
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Old 01-15-2015, 09:46 PM
 
Location: LBC
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Lotta sleeping on the Sierras here.

https://www.google.com/search?newwin...w=1639&bih=761
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