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View Poll Results: Most Livable Downtown?
Seattle 22 16.79%
San Francisco 27 20.61%
Los Angeles 4 3.05%
Denver 5 3.82%
Philadelphia 40 30.53%
D.C. 5 3.82%
Atlanta 6 4.58%
Houston 0 0%
Minneapolis 7 5.34%
Other 15 11.45%
Voters: 131. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 11-30-2013, 08:02 PM
 
Location: 60630
12,262 posts, read 18,028,679 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GatsbyGatz View Post
So much ignorance when it comes to people who don't live in Seattle try to talk about Seattle. Jealous people are just sick of hearing about how Seattle is so great, probably I'm a well-traveled man and Seattle is easily one of the finest cities by my experience. It's beautiful, clean, and is practically free of anything "ghetto" like you would find in nearly any other city. Downtown is polished and safe. There are some homeless, but otherwise, people here are just smarter and "ghetto" or gang-cultured people are virtually nonexistent here.

I can go on and on, but essentially, anyone who visits this city can easily see why it's so amazing.
When I lived in Seattle I always thought it was a real cookie cutter city..lol ...a rich, slightly snobby place free of real ghettos like most real urban cities have. However, it's the most beautiful city and state in the country and they have they best football team :-)

Go HAWKS
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Old 11-30-2013, 08:07 PM
 
Location: roaming gnome
12,391 posts, read 24,596,052 times
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I think it's often better to judge a downtown and it's immediate surrounding areas, and in cases of bigger cities at least in terms of work/play... how fast and convenient further out neighborhoods can get into downtown. This is where having extensive subway comes into play in making a city better. For instance, somebody can live 5 miles from DT in a very dense city, yet get to downtown faster with a fast subway line, than somebody living 2 miles from DT and are having to walk or take a slow bus. I'd say whoever gets into DT faster actually has the better "access" So being right next to downtown matters less. This plays out better in real life than on paper. Hence why cities like NYC and to obviously lesser extent, Chicago, DC, and Boston for example have numerous areas where you have walkable neighborhood and fast connections into downtown or other "play" neighborhoods. It also makes these cities look more expensive in their core on paper, ... but you can also live farther out in these places and still enjoy downtown more vs living closer to downtown in a smaller place. Long story short, people often think they can't afford bigger cities so move to a smaller one to live closer to downtown. In reality, they could just move farther out in a bigger city.

Last edited by grapico; 11-30-2013 at 08:19 PM..
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Old 11-30-2013, 08:08 PM
 
Location: Seattle, WA
2,959 posts, read 3,827,350 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by glass_of_merlot View Post
When I lived in Seattle I always thought it was a real cookie cutter city..lol ...a rich, slightly snobby place free of real ghettos like most real urban cities have. However, it's the most beautiful city and state in the country and they have they best football team :-)

Go HAWKS
Well I'm certainly not denying that point. People in Seattle are snobby! At the same time, though, I sort of like that
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Old 11-30-2013, 10:59 PM
 
Location: 60630
12,262 posts, read 18,028,679 times
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Maybe that's the problem. Seattle it's not for everyone. But there are other cities in Washington that are worth looking into. I also lived in Tacoma's stadium district and that was really nice.
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Old 12-01-2013, 02:34 PM
 
9,841 posts, read 11,455,147 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OyCrumbler View Post
When you say downtown plus one mile, is that a one mile radius from a central point or is it the boundaries of downtown plus another mile extended out from those boundaries?

I don't know, I didn't make the report, however, when examining the boundary they included in the report for D.C. and Philly, it looks like they used the same amount of land for both downtown's plus one mile. I would think the person who did the analysis for the sake of continuity would have wanted to use an apples to apples comparison too. I don't think they achieved it though because about 20%-25% of the land used for D.C. is non-populated parkland and D.C. still came out with 173,000 people living in the area. There is a whole island that is huge included for D.C. with no population. It doesn't look like any other downtown's according to the top 10 report have anything remotely close to the non-populated land D.C. has included in theirs. In fact, Philly doesn't have any major non-populated park land in their boundary.
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Old 12-01-2013, 06:22 PM
 
Location: Shaw.
2,226 posts, read 3,149,345 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OyCrumbler View Post
When you say downtown plus one mile, is that a one mile radius from a central point or is it the boundaries of downtown plus another mile extended out from those boundaries?
It looks like the report has the boundaries of the downtown plus one mile. If you look at the satellite downtowns (Geogetown, VA Medical Center) and you draw an extra mile around them, you end up with a large chunk of the geographical city (it's mostly sparsely populated areas outside). On the other hand, it excludes Arlington, which would add quite a bit to the population of downtown + a mile.
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Old 12-01-2013, 06:25 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pgm123 View Post
It looks like the report has the boundaries of the downtown plus one mile.
If you look at the report, it doesn't really include much in the downtown plus one mile. In Center City for instance, both the north and the south have the dark blue shade representing one mile. In D.C., there is only green which represents downtown plus a half mile towards the south. I believe the downtown plus one mile is the same for all the downtown's in this report. Many of the other downtown's also have varying amounts at the one mile level depending how large the commercial district was.
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Old 12-01-2013, 10:38 PM
 
Location: Shaw.
2,226 posts, read 3,149,345 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MDAllstar View Post
If you look at the report, it doesn't really include much in the downtown plus one mile. In Center City for instance, both the north and the south have the dark blue shade representing one mile. In D.C., there is only green which represents downtown plus a half mile towards the south. I believe the downtown plus one mile is the same for all the downtown's in this report. Many of the other downtown's also have varying amounts at the one mile level depending how large the commercial district was.
I think it's a consistent measurement between cities, but what the mile covers would depend on the size of the downtown. But it's definitely a mile in addition to the downtown. If you start at Thomas Circle and use the measure tool (on Defining Downtown Maps) and draw a diagonal line along Vermont Ave to Florida Ave, you get exactly one mile (which is the the downtown + one mile blue). There's some variation where it's longer than a mile, but I think that has to do with how the census tracts are set up.
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Old 12-01-2013, 10:50 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pgm123 View Post
I think it's a consistent measurement between cities, but what the mile covers would depend on the size of the downtown. But it's definitely a mile in addition to the downtown. If you start at Thomas Circle and use the measure tool (on Defining Downtown Maps) and draw a diagonal line along Vermont Ave to Florida Ave, you get exactly one mile (which is the the downtown + one mile blue). There's some variation where it's longer than a mile, but I think that has to do with how the census tracts are set up.

I didn't see that tool before. Very interesting, thanks for posting it. It's too bad close to 25% of the area included for D.C. is either park land or military base land. Seems like D.C. is the only place that suffers that fate in this report. D.C. still does extremely well in population despite that though. Pretty impressive really.
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Old 12-02-2013, 01:32 AM
 
Location: Seattle
566 posts, read 566,162 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by glass_of_merlot View Post
Maybe that's the problem. Seattle it's not for everyone. But there are other cities in Washington that are worth looking into. I also lived in Tacoma's stadium district and that was really nice.
Totally agree with this
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