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Old 02-05-2015, 08:47 PM
 
Location: That star on your map in the middle of the East Coast, DMV
3,979 posts, read 3,448,313 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bostonkid123 View Post
If it takes Boston almost $3 billion for a 4-mile light rail extension, and NYC $17 billion for a short 8-mile subway, then the 200-mile Maglev from DC to NYC would probably take a lot more than "$5-8 billion no brainer number" you suggested. Maybe add a "0" behind those figures.
I was referring to the DC-Baltimore segment, not to mention the other $5-10 billion that Japan would kick in to start off. Obviously this would be done in phases overall, if it runs all the way from DC-Boston costs will definitely rise above $100 Billion.
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Old 02-05-2015, 09:38 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the resident09 View Post
I was referring to the DC-Baltimore segment, not to mention the other $5-10 billion that Japan would kick in to start off. Obviously this would be done in phases overall, if it runs all the way from DC-Boston costs will definitely rise above $100 Billion.
Sorry but why would I want to take the Maglev from DC to B'more, when there's already the very affordable MARC train and Amtrak NE Regional/Acela that run on an hour basis between the 2 cities? Maglev is just completely wasteful and redundant investment. I have doubts that $10 billion is enough to even cover the Bmore-DC segment.

As things stand, America can't even get its acts together to build a proper HSR network (Acela not actual HSR, and Cali HSR will still need more than a decade for completion). Maglev is just fanciful day dreaming. Besides, most modern HSR lines (German ICE, China CRH, Japan) are able to reach 200+ MPH operating speed at a fraction of the cost of Maglev. In fact, China and Japan both have plans to up the speed on their existing HSR to 260+ MPH in the near future.
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Old 02-05-2015, 09:58 PM
 
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I think we can all agree that as cool as maglev is, it just isn't justifiable at this point in time. But, the northeast should definitely upgrade Acela to be true HSR. It wouldn't be all too expensive since a majority of the infrastructure is in place & would just need to be upgraded, & would only take a few years
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Old 02-06-2015, 07:30 AM
 
Location: Center City, Philadelphia
4,630 posts, read 2,778,980 times
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http://www.nytimes.com/2014/08/07/us...rail.html?_r=0

I thought this was a relatively interesting read. Don't know if anyone posted it before..

Quote:
The Acela, introduced by Amtrak in 2000, was America’s first successful high-speed train, and most days its cars are full. The train has reduced the time it takes to travel between Washington, New York and Boston, but aging tracks and bridges — including Baltimore’s 100-year-old tunnel where trains come to a crawl — have slowed it down. It takes two hours and 45 minutes to travel from New York to Washington on the Acela. If the Acela were a bullet train traveling on new tracks, it would take 90 minutes.

Another problem is that Amtrak’s funding is tied to annual appropriations from Congress, leaving it without a long-term source of money. “I do what I can do,” said Joseph Boardman, Amtrak’s president. “But I don’t sit back and wait for $15 billion to rebuild the Northeast Corridor.” For now, Amtrak is rebuilding a stretch of track in central New Jersey that will permit travel at 160 m.p.h. for 23 miles.

But advocates say they are hopeful.

“Once something gets built, then we’re going to see more projects get going,” said Ray LaHood, Mr. Obama’s first transportation secretary. Mr. LaHood said it took the Interstate System of highways decades to be completed, and he predicts that high-speed rail will be the same.

Mr. LaHood said California seemed the most likely candidate for success with high-speed rail, even though plans for a 520-mile train route between Los Angeles and San Francisco have been mired in controversy.

Despite strong backing from Gov. Jerry Brown, a court ruling had tied up state bond funding for the $68 billion project. An appeals court on July 31 threw out that ruling, which had been based on a lawsuit. But opponents are still increasing calls to kill the project, and polls show waning public support for it.

Still, California has begun construction of the tracks and put out bids for a vendor to build the trains. And the new rail project will get an infusion of funds from the state’s cap-and-trade program, which requires business to pay for excess pollution.

Continue reading the main story
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“The Golden Gate Bridge was tied up for years in hundreds of lawsuits,” said Jeff Morales, executive director of the California High-Speed Rail Authority. “We haven’t had quite that many.”
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Old 02-06-2015, 11:48 AM
 
226 posts, read 207,241 times
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The company developing a Dallas-Houston bullet train identified the two potential spots where they want to build a North Texas terminus Friday and announced a partnership with Matthews Southwest to turn the planned station into a mixed-use development.
Both prospective locations include land just south of downtown in the South Side district, but one includes land across Interstate 30 in downtown’s southern edge. Under the second scenario, Texas Central Railway would build the station above I-30, which is partially sunken as it moves south of downtown.
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Old 02-06-2015, 06:27 PM
 
2,557 posts, read 2,176,151 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thedirtypirate View Post
http://www.nytimes.com/2014/08/07/us...rail.html?_r=0

I thought this was a relatively interesting read. Don't know if anyone posted it before..
The NE corridor really has a lot potential only if the federal government would spend a little more to upgrade existing tracks to true HSR. We already have the land, the basic infrastructure, and a very modern rolling stock capable of reaching 200+ MPH on the Acela line. A $15 billion upgrade to the existing NE tracks sounds like a VERY VERY reasonable cost that could achieve significant travel time reduction between DC and NYC, reducing total travel time down to a mere 90 minutes according to the NYT article. With that kind of speed and convenience it would essentially eradicate the airline market between DC and NYC.
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Old 02-20-2015, 06:01 AM
 
Location: Londonderry, NH
41,492 posts, read 51,348,324 times
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One of the reasons HSR is having difficulties in the NE corridor is very effective lobbying by the airline industry trying to stop this threat to its business before it gets started. Another is the "Connecticut Coastal Navy" consisting of an alliance between wealthy recreation (sail mostly) boaters and commercial fisherman and the coastal fuel barges. The bridges in question are literally rusting into the ocean and becoming dangerous as well as unreliable. It would be expensive to replace these bridges on the existing grade with similar lift bridges. Perhaps it would be more practical to build new fixed bridges high enough to allow powered commercial boats and recreational boats but not high enough for sail boats. Those can find new dockage on the sound side of the bridges. IMHO inconveniencing a few elites in order to provide convenience for the many is perfectly reasonable.

IMHO MAGLEV simply uses far too much expensive copper to be practical. Conventional HSR uses far less expensive welded steel rail to achieve 99% of the efficiency of MAGLEV. Also conventional steel wheels on steel rail can be incrementally improved whereas MAGLEV requires a completely new guide way from the start. The incremental reduction in travel time along the shorter routes simply does not justify the additional expense.

The country should be investing in reducing our transportation costs in several ways. Carrying general freight in double stack container cars in mile long trains is much more efficient than carrying the same containers on individual trucks. One of the problems is a container on a truck using government supplied interstate highways is actually faster than a contained on privately owned rail system. IMHO this is absurd. The railroads can do better but are too cheap to try.

I hope to see a much more efficient fast rail passenger system along the eastern seaboard and the desperately need developments along the west coast. These will not require any fancy technology like MAGLEV. They will require political will and money.

If we knock off wasting money trying to secularize the Arabs we will have the money but the will is another thing.
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Old 04-17-2015, 01:03 PM
 
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Los Angeles & San Francisco is a more exciting project than a project from Boston to D.C,but the Northeast doesn't exactly need improved transportation like the Westcoast. In the 1920s Los Angeles had the biggest railroad system in the whole world so it's good to see the city getting back to improving rail transportation.Plus California is the most advanced state in America & it's population will be around 50 million in the next 30 years or so.Not only that but also ive heard Vegas & Hawaii will be connected to California via HSR in the future.
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Old 04-17-2015, 01:16 PM
 
Location: LBC
4,155 posts, read 4,481,432 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kobe25 View Post
Los Angeles & San Francisco is a more exciting project than a project from Boston to D.C,but the Northeast doesn't exactly need improved transportation like the Westcoast. In the 1920s Los Angeles had the biggest railroad system in the whole world so it's good to see the city getting back to improving rail transportation.Plus California is the most advanced state in America & it's population will be around 50 million in the next 30 years or so.Not only that but also ive heard Vegas & Hawaii will be connected to California via HSR in the future.
Uhhh...
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Old 04-17-2015, 01:24 PM
 
Location: The City
22,331 posts, read 32,138,839 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nslander View Post
Uhhh...
only the big island sadly
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