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View Poll Results: Would you rater live in the Chicago or Dallas metro areas?
Chicago metro 119 55.09%
Dallas metro 97 44.91%
Voters: 216. You may not vote on this poll

 
 
Old 02-06-2019, 01:45 PM
 
Location: Clemson, SC by way of Tyler,TX
4,270 posts, read 2,587,247 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ColdAilment View Post
Why does it always come back to density? I agree with the rest of your points and even share your point of view on the highly overrated McMansions that dot the south. However, why is density so coveted?
Are you a fan of sprawl? If you don't like density, check out Wichita.
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Old 02-06-2019, 07:18 PM
 
2,087 posts, read 2,561,308 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ColdAilment View Post
Why does it always come back to density? I agree with the rest of your points and even share your point of view on the highly overrated McMansions that dot the south. However, why is density so coveted?
Really??

Well, density drives vibrancy, mass transit, cohesion, culture and is essentially the template that underpins the world's great cities (want me to list 'em?). What's attractive about sprawl? Name one of the world's great cities that does not have dense urban core.
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Old 02-06-2019, 10:03 PM
 
Location: Mishawaka, Indiana
6,452 posts, read 8,673,777 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BigLake View Post
Really??

Well, density drives vibrancy, mass transit, cohesion, culture and is essentially the template that underpins the world's great cities (want me to list 'em?). What's attractive about sprawl? Name one of the world's great cities that does not have dense urban core.
I never said I was a fan of sprawl. However, it appears most people here measure a city's success by it's density, the more people living ontop of each other the better. Is there nothing redeemable about cities with 4,000-5,000 people per square mile?
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Old 02-06-2019, 10:16 PM
 
2,695 posts, read 1,254,623 times
Reputation: 1913
Quote:
Originally Posted by ColdAilment View Post
I never said I was a fan of sprawl. However, it appears most people here measure a city's success by it's density, the more people living ontop of each other the better. Is there nothing redeemable about cities with 4,000-5,000 people per square mile?
I never saw Chicago as the bolded NYC has the super-densities. Tenement-style areas etc. Chicago is no tenement-style city. It effectively prevented it long ago. If has high-rise/skyscraper-living to loft living dense areas .... but that is in limited areas it peaks.

Dallas won't even match any mid-sized Midwest cities in density. But if you do not like Chicago's many times more moderate density neighborhoods but with close-knit single homes .... maybe you just like more suburban-type densities and or mild winter cities.... Chicago is surprisingly low in attached row-housing levels too.

Last edited by DavePa; 02-06-2019 at 10:28 PM..
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Old 02-06-2019, 10:20 PM
 
Location: Clemson, SC by way of Tyler,TX
4,270 posts, read 2,587,247 times
Reputation: 2992
Quote:
Originally Posted by ColdAilment View Post
I never said I was a fan of sprawl. However, it appears most people here measure a city's success by it's density, the more people living ontop of each other the better. Is there nothing redeemable about cities with 4,000-5,000 people per square mile?
BigLake just explained it to you. If you don't get it or that's not you, then so be it.
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Old 02-06-2019, 10:38 PM
 
Location: Mishawaka, Indiana
6,452 posts, read 8,673,777 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DavePa View Post
I never saw Chicago as the bolded NYC has the super-densities. Tenement-style areas etc. Chicago is no tenement-style city. It effectively prevented it long ago. If has high-rise/skyscraper-living to loft living dense areas .... but that is in limited areas it peaks.

Dallas won't even match any mid-sized Midwest cities in density. But if you do not like Chicago's many times more moderate density neighborhoods but with close-knit single homes .... maybe you just like more suburban-type densities and or mild winter cities.... Chicago is surprisingly low in attached row-housing levels too.
You really do assume a lot.
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Old Yesterday, 02:02 PM
 
Location: Greater Houston
4,645 posts, read 8,758,072 times
Reputation: 2176
Quote:
Originally Posted by DavePa View Post
I never saw Chicago as the bolded NYC has the super-densities. Tenement-style areas etc. Chicago is no tenement-style city. It effectively prevented it long ago. If has high-rise/skyscraper-living to loft living dense areas .... but that is in limited areas it peaks.

Dallas won't even match any mid-sized Midwest cities in density. But if you do not like Chicago's many times more moderate density neighborhoods but with close-knit single homes .... maybe you just like more suburban-type densities and or mild winter cities.... Chicago is surprisingly low in attached row-housing levels too.
The reason I said that Chicago is a great place to work but not a great place to live in the Downtown Houston thread is because of those tenement-style houses in those moderate-density places (especially the Northside) that you glow about.

The houses in Dallas and Houston are much bigger. McMansions are prevalent in Texas, even in ritzy inner-city areas like Park Cities or River Oaks.

The average Texas suburbanite in both metros would find Chicago-proper bungalows to be too small and cramped to raise their families. The small-size of homes and lots would make sense given Chicago's brutal winters and the snow clearing that follows it. But in the hot summers of the Texas climate (which you can't seem to adapt your architectural prowess to), the indoor air-conditioned spaces take priority over the outdoor spaces (with the exception of the backyard swimming pool).
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Old Yesterday, 02:11 PM
 
Location: Upper West Side, Manhattan, NYC
14,471 posts, read 18,339,853 times
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Can you show examples of these tennement style residences on the north side that you are talking about in 2018/2019?
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Old Yesterday, 02:22 PM
 
Location: Mishawaka, Indiana
6,452 posts, read 8,673,777 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KerrTown View Post
The reason I said that Chicago is a great place to work but not a great place to live in the Downtown Houston thread is because of those tenement-style houses in those moderate-density places (especially the Northside) that you glow about.

The houses in Dallas and Houston are much bigger. McMansions are prevalent in Texas, even in ritzy inner-city areas like Park Cities or River Oaks.

The average Texas suburbanite in both metros would find Chicago-proper bungalows to be too small and cramped to raise their families. The small-size of homes and lots would make sense given Chicago's brutal winters and the snow clearing that follows it. But in the hot summers of the Texas climate (which you can't seem to adapt your architectural prowess to), the indoor air-conditioned spaces take priority over the outdoor spaces (with the exception of the backyard swimming pool).

Some other posters may think they educated me on this, but I in fact already knew, I travel to Chicago multiple times a year. Chicago has no tenements like New York City does, they demolished all of them in the 1970's and 1980's. They have row houses in certain areas and multilevel apartments in the middle of the city, yes.



Maybe you're thinking of something else and not using the right word, I too am curious to see the tenement style houses on the north side.
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Old Yesterday, 02:49 PM
 
Location: Greater Houston
4,645 posts, read 8,758,072 times
Reputation: 2176
Quote:
Originally Posted by ColdAilment View Post
Some other posters may think they educated me on this, but I in fact already knew, I travel to Chicago multiple times a year. Chicago has no tenements like New York City does, they demolished all of them in the 1970's and 1980's. They have row houses in certain areas and multilevel apartments in the middle of the city, yes.



Maybe you're thinking of something else and not using the right word, I too am curious to see the tenement style houses on the north side.
For Texans, houses in places like West Ridge or Ravenswood would be small enough to be tenements. Dave doesn't understand the culture of Texas (and refuses to learn a little about it--typical Midwestern xenophobia). He does defend glowingly Chicago a lot, especially when the Chicago/NYC rivalry is brought up in an aside!

My Midwestern cousins have remarked that the school buildings in my West Houston suburb are so large. The neighborhood elementary schools are the size of Illinois high schools. The high schools alone are as large as a community college or small university in Chicagoland.
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