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Old 04-12-2014, 10:36 PM
 
1,112 posts, read 805,432 times
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*This is actually not a city vs. city comparison, but a generalized nation-wide question*

I just graduated with a Masters degree in Computer Science from a school in Southern California. I went into this program after unsuccessful attempts to find work with a Masters degree in Public Administration. Let's just say that I am not finding work in Southern California. I have interviewed for many jobs, but each employer has many choices to choose from, and I am consistently not making the cut. There are tech jobs here but they are not very open to hiring new graduates.

I have held some temporary employment, but once my education is discovered I am consistently let go. Not to mention the traffic here is absolutely horrid and cost of living is the highest of anywhere I have ever lived. When I moved to Southern California, I made the mistake of assuming it was similar to where I lived for several years (NM) and up until 2011, I never had an issue finding work. I admit that I did not do my research and I was naive to think that if I held education, I should be able to find something in a big city. I would like to redeem myself and not make that same mistake again when trying to build my life elsewhere.

So I would like to know: What cities do you feel are best for entry level Computer Science professionals? Preferably in software engineering and development. I have some programming experience and development when I did an internship at a government facility. I am constantly teaching myself new programming languages and environments as well.

I am interested in cities that have growth for IT/CS majors, relatively low cost of living, and open to minority females.
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Old 04-12-2014, 10:46 PM
 
Location: Tokyo, Japan
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It depends on your expertise in the field. While it may seem like the obvious answer is "the San Francisco Bay Area" I'm in the technology field (SAP ABAP programming both Technical and FiCO (financial applications)).

For programmers I would probably say Philadelphia, if you work in SAP, which a huge segment of the world's programmers do (as Visual Basic, Sequel Server, Oracle are all either dying or inferior pay-grade programs; Java, Python, C++ being the programming languages) then there is the New York and Philadelphia areas. For computer science majors in particular, then definitely Philadelphia. If your expertise is FiCO, then don't look anywhere else except New York, where the offers for you are going to be the most lucrative, period. Your salary here will easily compensate for cost of living (as I see it's a concern for you).

If you work in software, hardware, and concept evolution (innovation of new products) then it's easily by far and large the San Francisco Bay Area. As well as putting together a start-up, if you're in need of resources then Angel Investment and Venture Capitalism is by far and large the Silicon Valley's trade. If you want cheaper but still robust alternatives (but keep in mind, big drop off in quality) then there is Seattle, Austin, and Portland in that very order.

For military/government/defense contractors in the programming field, then try Washington DC, Dallas-Fort Worth, and Boston (especially if it's information technology division for Dallas, Telecom Corridor, in particular) as some other choices.

Last edited by Facts Kill Rhetoric; 04-12-2014 at 11:31 PM..
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Old 04-12-2014, 10:55 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
4,318 posts, read 4,839,991 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Red John View Post
It depends on your expertise in the field. While it may seem like the obvious answer is "the San Francisco Bay Area" I'm in the technology field (SAP ABAP programming both Technical and FiCO (financial applications)).

For programmers I would probably say Philadelphia, if you work in SAP, which a huge segment of the world's programmers do (as Visual Basic, Sequel Server, Java, Oracle are all either dying or inferior pay-grade programs) then there is the New York and Philadelphia areas. For computer science majors in particular, then definitely Philadelphia.

If you work in software, hardware, and concept evolution (innovation of new products) then it's easily by far and large the San Francisco Bay Area. As well as putting together a start-up, if you're in need of resources then Angel Investment and Venture Capitalism is by far and large the Silicon Valley's trade.

For military/government/defense contractors in the programming field, then try Washington DC, Dallas-Fort Worth, and Boston (especially if it's information technology division for Dallas, Telecom Corridor, in particular) as some other choices.

What? Java development is probably the most in demand. And Oracle isn't going anywhere. The pay grades are plenty high
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Old 04-12-2014, 10:57 PM
 
1,112 posts, read 805,432 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Red John View Post
It depends on your expertise in the field. While it may seem like the obvious answer is "the San Francisco Bay Area" I'm in the technology field (SAP ABAP programming both Technical and FiCO (financial applications)).

For programmers I would probably say Philadelphia, if you work in SAP, which a huge segment of the world's programmers do (as Visual Basic, Sequel Server, Java, Oracle are all either dying or inferior pay-grade programs) then there is the New York and Philadelphia areas. For computer science majors in particular, then definitely Philadelphia. If you're expertise is FiCO, then don't look anywhere else except New York, where the offers for you are going to be the most lucrative, period. Your salary here will easily compensate for cost of living (as I see it's a concern for you).

If you work in software, hardware, and concept evolution (innovation of new products) then it's easily by far and large the San Francisco Bay Area. As well as putting together a start-up, if you're in need of resources then Angel Investment and Venture Capitalism is by far and large the Silicon Valley's trade. If you want cheaper but still robust alternatives (but keep in mind, big drop off in quality) then there is Seattle, Austin, and Portland in that very order.

For military/government/defense contractors in the programming field, then try Washington DC, Dallas-Fort Worth, and Boston (especially if it's information technology division for Dallas, Telecom Corridor, in particular) as some other choices.
Interesting you mention this because I recently interviewed for QVC, and they contacted me literally minutes after applying. I was told they need skilled graduates in computing there. Thanks for the suggestion, I may take a closer look in the Philadelphia area.
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Old 04-12-2014, 10:57 PM
 
Location: Tokyo, Japan
6,479 posts, read 7,726,682 times
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Originally Posted by branh0913 View Post
What? Java development is probably the most in demand. And Oracle isn't going anywhere. The pay grades are plenty high
Oracle is the poor mans SAP for programmers. Higher skill sets will always gravitate towards SAP, bar none.

SAP is recognized the world over, what company doesn't use SAP modern day? Even the NBA uses SAP, every world class airport and bank on the planet uses SAP, more than Oracle, which is left for department stores like Kohls and community colleges to use when they transfer information, where it belongs.

Last edited by Facts Kill Rhetoric; 04-12-2014 at 11:21 PM..
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Old 04-12-2014, 10:58 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Red John View Post
Java is the poor mans SAP.


SAP and Java have two very different focuses and markets. Can't really compare the two.
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Old 04-12-2014, 11:14 PM
 
Location: Tokyo, Japan
6,479 posts, read 7,726,682 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by branh0913 View Post
SAP and Java have two very different focuses and markets. Can't really compare the two.
Meant to type Oracle, since like SAP it's enterprise software. Was thinking Java versus Python, mismatched them.

Python is a late bloomer, but I'm pretty sure it's going to cut into Java's market. C++ is a low level language (useful skill nonetheless), so Java never had any direct competition until now that Python's developing more rapidly. It's easier to run and it's development on Syntax is less complex (no curly braces like Java and other languages).

Both SAP's FiCO and the Technical divisions smash anything in Oracle though. Have you used Oracle's services, namely PeopleSoft? Horrendously inferior quality service management program.

Last edited by Facts Kill Rhetoric; 04-12-2014 at 11:29 PM..
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Old 04-12-2014, 11:40 PM
 
Location: Tokyo, Japan
6,479 posts, read 7,726,682 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jabber_wocky View Post
Interesting you mention this because I recently interviewed for QVC, and they contacted me literally minutes after applying. I was told they need skilled graduates in computing there. Thanks for the suggestion, I may take a closer look in the Philadelphia area.
If they take you, go with it but keep your resume on the market. Once you land a more lucrative offer, ditch them but let them know ahead of time that you have to take a leave (obviously).

Also, are you willing to work contract? You'll be assigned to a new city (all over the world) with a new project every 6 months to 18 months. Choose the projects you are most comfortable with, your company will re-assign you in any you are not comfortable being apart of.

Doing overseas work will typically get you a 5% raise in pay compared to doing work in the United States and you'll be around a more competitive (and brilliant) labor pool depending on which cities your projects are globally. For starters, they do end of the year portfolios and typically let go of 10% of their new recruits, based on performance, project developers/management will decide. In the United States, the smaller cities will have less fierce competition, the larger ones in the United States (or world for that matter) will be much harder but far more lucrative.

Good luck.
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Old 04-12-2014, 11:43 PM
 
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I am willing to work contract, but the idea of constantly traveling frightens me a bit. A friend of mine works contracts and it appears cut-throat.
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Old 04-13-2014, 12:02 AM
 
Location: Nashville, TN
4,286 posts, read 3,352,979 times
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Nashville for Healthcare/Music/Media IT
Huntsville for Aerospace/Government IT
Raleigh for all things IT
Austin for all things IT
Houston and Dallas for all things IT

With your credentials, you should really be checking the up and coming cities listed above for IT.
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