U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S. > City vs. City
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
View Poll Results: Best city by design?
Toronto 25 19.38%
Chicago 44 34.11%
San Francisco 24 18.60%
Washington DC 36 27.91%
Voters: 129. You may not vote on this poll

 
 
Old 04-17-2014, 03:54 PM
 
Location: Upper West Side, Manhattan, NYC
14,304 posts, read 17,948,992 times
Reputation: 6255

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by sav858 View Post
I have been to both areas. Nobody was talking about population density, at least not me. Being more urban doesn't necessarily mean having a higher population density. STRUCTURALLY, the area around VZ Center is much more dense and urban, not with residents as I'd imagine a lot of those building are filled with workers and what not. So I guess if you plopped down the United Center in the middle of the loop Wrigleyville would still be urban correct?

So please explain what is so urban and dense about a drive thru MacDonald's and Taco Bell literally across the street from Wrigley Field? lol
I understand what you're saying - density goes with building density and people density. The Taco Bell and McDonald's are absolute anomalies in that area. So you think this is not in the middle of the city and not urban?

http://www.sierraus.com/wp-content/u...iew_SiteOL.jpg

I bet the one time you went to Wrigley Field, you hopped off the train, saw that side of the stadium and that's your opinion. You can clearly see above that your opinion is very skewed.

Last edited by marothisu; 04-17-2014 at 04:03 PM..
Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-17-2014, 04:03 PM
 
Location: SF Bay Area
15,404 posts, read 24,408,127 times
Reputation: 8775
Quote:
Originally Posted by marothisu View Post
I understand what you're saying - density goes with building density and people density. The Taco Bell and McDonald's are absolute anomalies in that area Apart from that, it's just as structurally dense as the DC area and the population density is clearly more.

This whole thing is laughable. Even if you were to say that the area around the Verizon Center is more, your original comment about the stadium being "far out" is not true. It's right in the middle of the city.
Speaking of being blind, I don't see how you could possibly think the area around Wrigleyville is as structurally dense. Did you not notice how the buildings around Wrigley are shorter and there are more gaps and deadspace like parking lots?

Well anomolies or not they are still there right across the street. But either way I don't get how you can't see the difference between this:
https://maps.google.com/maps?q=lake+...12,135.09,,0,0

and this:
https://maps.google.com/maps?q=veriz...,6.55,,0,-0.23

When I say the "middle of the city" I'm more referring to the "downtown" areas, so in Chicago's case that would be The Loop/River North areas. What do you consider "middle of the city"? Anything that is urban?

Quote:
I don't see how in the world you think that's not built up a lot.
Where the hell did I ever say that? You keep putting words in my mouth. It's not AS built up. NOBODY ever said it's not built up a lot
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-17-2014, 04:03 PM
 
9,591 posts, read 10,929,874 times
Reputation: 2128
Quote:
Originally Posted by marothisu View Post
I understand what you're saying - density goes with building density and people density. The Taco Bell and McDonald's are absolute anomalies in that area. You act as if that's the norm and it's not even close to it (and that McDonald's is probably going away soon) for that area. Anybody who has spent enough time in the greater area could tell you this and even the OP knows this. Apart from that, it's just as structurally dense as the DC area and the population density is clearly more. This whole thing is laughable. Even if you were to say that the area around the Verizon Center is more, your original comment about the stadium being "far out" is not true. It's right in the middle of the city.

Let's look at Google Maps zoomed in a bit and take advantage of it showing us where all the buildings are.
Wrigley Field -> http://goo.gl/maps/Kr8FG
Verizon Center -> http://goo.gl/maps/QT4Xy


The area around Wrigley Field is very built up and you can clearly see the anomaly that is McDonald's there to the left of Wrigley Field that is nothing like the rest of the neighborhood which is packed with buildings.

Here's another aerial look at it: http://www.sierraus.com/wp-content/u...iew_SiteOL.jpg

I don't see how in the world you think that's not built up a lot.
There are rowhouses a block from Wrigley field. How is a rowhouse more urban than highrise commercial buildings? What is a block from Verizon Center? City Center DC is a block from the Verizon Center. It is too early to be drunk and April fools was weeks ago. What is going on?
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-17-2014, 04:11 PM
 
Location: Upper West Side, Manhattan, NYC
14,304 posts, read 17,948,992 times
Reputation: 6255
Quote:
Originally Posted by MDAllstar View Post
There are rowhouses a block from Wrigley field. How is a rowhouse more urban than highrise commercial buildings? What is a block from Verizon Center? City Center DC is a block from the Verizon Center. It is too early to be drunk and April fools was weeks ago. What is going on?
How is this not urban?
http://www.sierraus.com/wp-content/u...iew_SiteOL.jpg

You're getting a little carried away with the term "high rise" - most of the buildings are not high rise though a few are close. I never said the area around VC wasn't urban but you guys saying that the area around Wrigley Field isn't is just extremely frivolous. There are taller buildings on average, and closer together in DC, and there's more people who live around Wrigley Field than the VC too.

Also if you're going to talk about high rises being right there, then the Target Center is just as urban as any of these being in downtown Minneapolis.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-17-2014, 04:14 PM
 
Location: SF Bay Area
15,404 posts, read 24,408,127 times
Reputation: 8775
Quote:
Originally Posted by marothisu View Post
I bet the one time you went to Wrigley Field, you hopped off the train, saw that side of the stadium and that's your opinion. You can clearly see above that your opinion is very skewed.
We went bar hopping down whatever that main road through Wrigleyville is. Cool area but, it's mostly seems like a bunch of one and two story buildings. Urban yes but not that urban.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-17-2014, 04:15 PM
 
Location: SF Bay Area
15,404 posts, read 24,408,127 times
Reputation: 8775
Quote:
Originally Posted by marothisu View Post
How is this not urban?
http://www.sierraus.com/wp-content/u...iew_SiteOL.jpg

You're getting a little carried away with the term "high rise" - most of the buildings are not high rise though a few are close. I never said the area around VC wasn't urban but you guys saying that the area around Wrigley Field isn't is just extremely frivolous. There are taller buildings on average, and closer together in DC, and there's more people who live around Wrigley Field than the VC too.

Also if you're going to talk about high rises being right there, then the Target Center is just as urban as any of these being in downtown Minneapolis.
Can you show me a single person that said the area around Wrigley isn't urban?
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-17-2014, 04:18 PM
 
Location: Upper West Side, Manhattan, NYC
14,304 posts, read 17,948,992 times
Reputation: 6255
Quote:
Originally Posted by sav858 View Post
We went bar hopping down whatever that main road through Wrigleyville is. Cool area but, it's mostly seems like a bunch of one and two story buildings. Urban yes but not that urban.
Yeah, that's how that street is - and it's still dense but not very tall, Most of the other part of the neighborhood is 3 and 4 stories tall and then about a half a mile away are a bunch of true high rises (not 10 story "high rises")
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-17-2014, 04:20 PM
 
9,591 posts, read 10,929,874 times
Reputation: 2128
Quote:
Originally Posted by marothisu View Post
How is this not urban?
http://www.sierraus.com/wp-content/u...iew_SiteOL.jpg

You're getting a little carried away with the term "high rise" - most of the buildings are not high rise though a few are close. I never said the area around VC wasn't urban but you guys saying that the area around Wrigley Field isn't is just extremely frivolous. There are taller buildings on average, and closer together in DC, and there's more people who live around Wrigley Field than the VC too.

Also if you're going to talk about high rises being right there, then the Target Center is just as urban as any of these being in downtown Minneapolis.

A rowhouse will NEVER be as urban as a commercial building. It's not close. Nothing about their building codes or structures have anything in common. DuPont Circle is not even close to as urban as Penn Quarter. It's just not. A 14 story building against a rowhouse? What is going on here?
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-17-2014, 04:23 PM
 
Location: Upper West Side, Manhattan, NYC
14,304 posts, read 17,948,992 times
Reputation: 6255
Quote:
Originally Posted by sav858 View Post
Can you show me a single person that said the area around Wrigley isn't urban?
Let me show you how I interpret this:

Quote:
Originally Posted by sav858 View Post
The area around Verizon Center is more urban though, its literally right in the middle of the city. Wrigley is a little bit out there in a lower density neighborhood. Wrigley has a suburban style MacDonald's and Taco Bell across the street with drive-thru's lol.
You're comparing "literally right in the middle of the city" to saying "Wrigley is a little bit out there in a lower density neighborhood."

1) No, it's not a little bit out there. It's right in the middle of the city. Wrigley Field is 5.5 miles south of the closest suburb and 9 miles east of the closest suburb in that direction. It's also 20 miles north of the nearest southern suburb to it.

2) The connotation for "lower density neighborhood" on here to most means population density. You didn't even specify the type of density. So do you blame me for thinking you meant population density? It was only after I showed you that the area around Wrigley Field is more population dense than the area around Verizon Center that you tell me that you meant building density.

The neighborhood it's in is 30,000 people per sq mile overall, which is just as much as the area that River North, Streeterville, and Gold Coast sit in downtown.

Sorry, but if you say "lower density neighborhood", almost all people on this forum will think you are talking about population density. Next time - define what you mean beforehand and I think it was still a CYA after you saw the hard data.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-17-2014, 04:25 PM
 
Location: Upper West Side, Manhattan, NYC
14,304 posts, read 17,948,992 times
Reputation: 6255
Quote:
Originally Posted by MDAllstar View Post
A rowhouse will NEVER be as urban as a commercial building. It's not close. Nothing about their building codes or structures have anything in common. DuPont Circle is not even close to as urban as Penn Quarter. It's just not. A 14 story building against a rowhouse? What is going on here?
The pure fact that you think there's row homes around Wrigley Field and the surrounding neighborhood shows your unfamiliarity with the whole thing.

Also if you want to talk about high rises:
http://cooleronthelakeshore.com/word...4/DSC01973.jpg
http://photos1.blogger.com/blogger/7...rigleysm.3.jpg
Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:
Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S. > City vs. City
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top