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Old 04-23-2014, 12:38 AM
 
Location: Southern California
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Quote:
Originally Posted by peterlemonjello View Post
Chicago might have something to say about that.

One thing I loved about Chicago was that it never tried to be anything it wasnt. Chicago is a world class, international city. However, its also a Middle America, Midwestern, truly American city. It never triend to deny any of that about itself.

The list actually looks pretty accurate to me, though I think Atlanta is more country that the list makes it to be. I actually mean that in a good way.

Either way, I dont think being country is a bad thing. Different strokes for different folks.
except Chicago is more country than Minneapolis? what? how?
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Old 04-23-2014, 01:25 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rgb123 View Post
except Chicago is more country than Minneapolis? what? how?
Go 40 miles North, south, or West.
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Old 04-23-2014, 09:04 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nephi215 View Post
Lets quit with the dry sarcasm. We all know there is nothing "country" about Philadelphia.
What's wrong with being a little "country?" Since "country" often means "rural," "uncouth," and "unsophisticated" to most people, then 99.9% of America's population is only a generation or two removed from the country.

Most West Indians are "country." Most come from small towns in the countryside where they would be chopping down sugarcane or herding goats had they not immigrated.

Most Chinese immigrants to New York are from poor, rural areas.

Most Italian immigrants came from the poorest, most rural sections of Italy or Sicily.

So in that sense, we're all influenced by the "country." Besides, I don't really see how any big city can really be country. "Country" and "southern" are not synonyms.
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Old 04-23-2014, 09:28 AM
 
Location: Willowbend/Houston
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rgb123 View Post
except Chicago is more country than Minneapolis? what? how?
I actually could believe it. Minneapolis is so ridiculously hipster that I dont find it country at all. When I lived in Chicago, I did know quite a few people who moved there from rural Illinois/Wisconsin that were quite country.
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Old 04-23-2014, 09:43 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marothisu View Post
The metro area has a number of country music fans in it. The city is a little different. I can only think of 2 or 3 country bars in the entire city to be honest with you. One of them is interesting as it's a huge sports bar but in the back it's a music venue mainly doing country shows. I actually went to one, once as I have a friend who is very cosmopolitan but for some reason loves the music. When I went, I heard peoples' conversations and most were from the suburbs. I can count only two friends I have in town here that legitimately like country music. Everyone else I know and works with seem to have a negative opinion of the entire scene and music.

If this was metro area, I'd agree with the ranking. City should probably be higher though I'm not sure about bottom 5. Bottom 10 for sure though but the bottom 5 cities is definitely less "country" than Chicago is. Most people here hate country music and country **** really though but there are some fans in the city but few and far in between, but some of the suburban people are on average more fans of that.


In any case, I don't understand how each category was rated as they don't say any of their methodology.
Well I noticed Chicago's higher rankings were in things like guns and cowboy boots. After being here quite a long time, I've certainly noticed that the guns here aren't "country" but south/west side criminal. The cowboy boots I see in the city are mostly among the hispanic/mexican crowd. Not really what I think of as "country".

It's all a mixed bag I guess.
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Old 04-23-2014, 07:03 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
So in that sense, we're all influenced by the "country." Besides, I don't really see how any big city can really be country. "Country" and "southern" are not synonyms.
The stupid criteria on that list aside, I think this definitely true. Over our history, this nation has become more and more urban. People have moved from rural areas to the cities, and some of their culture, customs, and values came with them.

I really hadn't thought too much about the Italian aspect. Makes you think, any time you eat a hearty Italian dish in a big city, you are eating country comfort food from rural Italy, and those recipes were handed down over generations.

Obviously the city life has a profound impact on the newer generations, but you're right that you can't deny the influence.
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Old 04-23-2014, 07:15 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nashvols View Post

I really hadn't thought too much about the Italian aspect. Makes you think, any time you eat a hearty Italian dish in a big city, you are eating country comfort food from rural Italy, and those recipes were handed down over generations.
Though a lot of Italians came from Naples which was one of the most urban cities in Europe... A lot of the "red sauce" Italian food and pizza that's popular here came direct from Napoli.

Last edited by Deezus; 04-23-2014 at 07:26 PM..
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Old 04-23-2014, 07:19 PM
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Location: Western Massachusetts
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Deezus View Post
Though a lot of Italians also came from Naples which was one of the most urban cities in Europe... A lot of the "red sauce" Italian food and pizza that's popular here came direct from Napoli.
southern Italy's population was mostly rural 100 years ago, despite having some old very urban cities.
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Old 04-23-2014, 07:25 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
southern Italy's population was mostly rural 100 years ago, despite having some old very urban cities.
Yes, but a very large number of Italian immigrants came from Naples(far more than any other large Italian city)--in part that's why urban Neapolitan cuisine or variations of it become so dominant as "Italian food" abroad. Spaghetti with tomato sauce and pizza are straight from the urban culture of Naples.

Off-topic, but this thread will get pulled in a hundred more directions as it is...
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Old 04-24-2014, 04:01 PM
 
Location: Milwaukee
1,314 posts, read 1,651,358 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dispo4 View Post
Go 40 miles North, south, or West.
Wait, what? Go 40 miles North, South, East or West of Minneapolis and you truly are in BF Egypt my friend. Go 40 miles outside Chicago NS&W and you're basically still in the exurbs or entering the Milwaukee area. It's quite populous outside Chicago, not so much 45 minutes outside the Twin Cities.

Milwaukee's "country" score was pushed quite a bit by being #2 in gun ownership, but I can guarantee it's not just the 30-some percent of the city that's white. Call it whatever you want, but I've spent a lot of time in the woods (though I'm not a hunter) and I've never once seen a black dude hunting in Wisconsin.
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