U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S. > City vs. City
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
View Poll Results: Dallas vs. Houston
Dallas 127 64.80%
Houston 69 35.20%
Voters: 196. You may not vote on this poll

Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 04-28-2014, 07:59 PM
 
Location: Austin/Houston
2,819 posts, read 4,237,139 times
Reputation: 2072

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ant131531 View Post
Houston doesn't have any people walking in it's downtown making it rather stale IMO.
Neither does the actual "downtown" of downtown Dallas.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-28-2014, 08:11 PM
 
Location: Tokyo, Japan
6,479 posts, read 7,719,547 times
Reputation: 7295
A few things, Midtown isn't Houston's most urban neighborhood nor it's best. Frankly, this forum seems like "opposite day" to me in regards to everything. Houston's top neighborhoods are Montrose, Museum District, Upper Kirby, River Oaks, the Heights, Neartown. Only three of those are more urban than Midtown. That pleasure in my belief belongs to the Museum District and within 10 years from now, Upper Kirby will put Midtown to sleep too. Neartown as well. In the long range, probably EaDo too.

As for the land area of Downtown Houston, it's inside Houston's most inner loop (even more inner than the actual Inner Loop (Loop 610)), which is created by the three rings of I-69, I-10, and I-45. The poster you asked is correct, Downtown Houston is 1.8 square miles and has always been, since it's bounded by the loop, it's definition has never changed in history and cannot ever change.

If you would like proof yourself, then Houston is a very math friendly and basic city, as it is on a grid. What you do is find a North-South arterial street in Downtown (use Main, it's simple and easy) and go from the most southern terminus of Downtown to the most northern terminus of Downtown. It's over a mile and a half long. Then for East-West pick another street (pick Dallas Street) and do the same. After you have the length of both sides, then just multiply them and it will give you the area of Downtown. Easy and straight forward.

As for vibrancy of Downtown Houston, if this was three years ago, ten years ago, so on, then yes, saying no one walks around there would be accurate. Today? Not so much. Both Market Square and Discovery Green are always lively it seems (and Discovery Green has been credited for Downtown's revival quite a bit), any day of the week, the Downtown's nightlife has hit a resurgence, and it's more than just people that live there going there now. It's people from all surrounding neighborhoods, they walk along Dallas Street, Louisiana Street, Caroline Street, and so on. It's still a smaller number than it's size needs it to be but it's a massive improvement than "dead as nails Downtown Houston" of yesteryear.

Downtown Houston has more units in the pipeline now than currently exists (about two times more) and Annise Parker (spelling?) as well as her advisors in the Downtown Houston Inititiative want to rapidly make it into an actual neighborhood. Some 30% of the surface parking lots in the city's Downtown will be torn up and developed on in the next 12 months. The Downtown will have a brand new "retail district", a brand new "entertainment district", several new green space, places where you can rent canoes and kayaks to enjoy recreation on the bayou, and of course residential and nightlife are all happening.

Dallas' Downtown is going in a similar trajectory.

Finally, on the topic of vegetation. The trees in Houston transition from piney woods north of I-10 to coastal plains trees south of I-10. North of I-10 will exhibit very dense forestation, tall and skinny trees, with razor sharp blade-like pine leaves, lush and green in color, and well above 60 feet in height (Conroe, the Woodlands, North Houston, Cypress, Springs, New Caney, Cleveland, so on). South of I-10 will have shorter 20-30 feet tall trees, what you will typically find in Dallas more so, and the forestation is no longer as dense, and palm trees start sporadically joining the terrain all over until you reach the Gulf of Mexico.

Last edited by Facts Kill Rhetoric; 04-28-2014 at 08:23 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-28-2014, 08:36 PM
 
Location: Upper East Side of Texas
12,521 posts, read 22,349,353 times
Reputation: 4890
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nairobi View Post
NYC isn't. Several parts of the city are hilly.
Meh

Its flat compared to Dallas which has some decent rolling terrain in some spots.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-28-2014, 09:16 PM
 
3,453 posts, read 2,973,952 times
Reputation: 1644
Quote:
Originally Posted by Metro Matt View Post
D/FW is only ~400,000 larger than Houston/Galveston in population. Metro density numbers are so close its like splitting hairs.
Jersey and Harlem are to most hilly the rest of it is flat
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-28-2014, 09:33 PM
 
Location: The Magnolia City
8,931 posts, read 11,328,392 times
Reputation: 4853
Quote:
Originally Posted by Metro Matt View Post
Meh

Its flat compared to Dallas which has some decent rolling terrain in some spots.
Meh. You've never been to New York City.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-28-2014, 11:10 PM
 
6,795 posts, read 6,594,417 times
Reputation: 5411
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nairobi View Post
Meh. You've never been out of Texas.
Fixed that for you.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-28-2014, 11:40 PM
 
Location: Houston, TX
135 posts, read 139,008 times
Reputation: 322
Quote:
Originally Posted by Metro Matt View Post
Even Los Angeles (LA Basin) & NYC are completely flat.
Swing and a miss. Your 0-2 now.

The highest point in the city limits of Los Angeles is over 5,000 feet. Within the county, it is over 10,000 feet. I own (and lived in) a house which is at 800' above sea level, is smack in the middle of coastal LA county, and share this high elevation with over 100,000 other people. Untold hundreds of thousands more live in the Hollywood Hills, San Fernando hill communities, Santa Monica Mountains, Signal Hill, Chino Hills, Pasadena, Altadena...... the list is just too numerous too count. The city is split by a mountain chain! Like almost every American city outside of Appalachia, Metro LA is situated primarily on a plain, one that is sedimentary infill of the surrounding mountains - to call it flat would be like calling the base-camp of Mt. Everest flat. When compared to places like Houston or Dallas, that statement is both comic and inaccurate. My backyard (built on a hill) literally has as much elevation change as the entire city of Houston - 120 feet. Even a drive from LAX to Disneyland will encounter more elevation change than anywhere in Houston (and for the love of God, everyone, please stop posting obscure google map pictures - they are completely unconvincing). And did I mention DFW is built on a flat prairie?

This whole tangent was derived from comparing the natural beauty and "flatness" of DFW and Houston. I'll break it to you - they are both very, very flat, and not particularly attractive in any mass-appeal sense. Sparse prairie or subtropical forest, neither city really has a leg up on the other or can claim geography as fundamentally attractive part of living there. Comparing the two places (they are more alike then different) can be fun, but please, lets all mutually admit that they were not blessed with anything topographically interesting or noteworthy. That is how the rest of America sees it, anyways......
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-29-2014, 12:05 AM
 
Location: Austin/Houston
2,819 posts, read 4,237,139 times
Reputation: 2072
Quote:
Originally Posted by Red John View Post
A few things, Midtown isn't Houston's most urban neighborhood nor it's best. Frankly, this forum seems like "opposite day" to me in regards to everything. Houston's top neighborhoods are Montrose, Museum District, Upper Kirby, River Oaks, the Heights, Neartown. Only three of those are more urban than Midtown. That pleasure in my belief belongs to the Museum District and within 10 years from now, Upper Kirby will put Midtown to sleep too. Neartown as well. In the long range, probably EaDo too.
Midtown Houston may not be Houston's most urban neighborhood, but outside of downtown, it is the best neighborhood that shows the initiative towards urban development.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-29-2014, 05:28 AM
 
Location: The Magnolia City
8,931 posts, read 11,328,392 times
Reputation: 4853
Quote:
Originally Posted by J_Treehorn View Post
Swing and a miss. Your 0-2 now.

The highest point in the city limits of Los Angeles is over 5,000 feet. Within the county, it is over 10,000 feet. I own (and lived in) a house which is at 800' above sea level, is smack in the middle of coastal LA county, and share this high elevation with over 100,000 other people. Untold hundreds of thousands more live in the Hollywood Hills, San Fernando hill communities, Santa Monica Mountains, Signal Hill, Chino Hills, Pasadena, Altadena...... the list is just too numerous too count. The city is split by a mountain chain! Like almost every American city outside of Appalachia, Metro LA is situated primarily on a plain, one that is sedimentary infill of the surrounding mountains - to call it flat would be like calling the base-camp of Mt. Everest flat. When compared to places like Houston or Dallas, that statement is both comic and inaccurate. My backyard (built on a hill) literally has as much elevation change as the entire city of Houston - 120 feet. Even a drive from LAX to Disneyland will encounter more elevation change than anywhere in Houston (and for the love of God, everyone, please stop posting obscure google map pictures - they are completely unconvincing). And did I mention DFW is built on a flat prairie?

This whole tangent was derived from comparing the natural beauty and "flatness" of DFW and Houston. I'll break it to you - they are both very, very flat, and not particularly attractive in any mass-appeal sense. Sparse prairie or subtropical forest, neither city really has a leg up on the other or can claim geography as fundamentally attractive part of living there. Comparing the two places (they are more alike then different) can be fun, but please, lets all mutually admit that they were not blessed with anything topographically interesting or noteworthy. That is how the rest of America sees it, anyways......
Well, no, I won't admit that. That's because I'm not one of those who thinks a place has to have mountains in order to be naturally beautiful. I know why your average person wouldn't find most of the Texas landscape beautiful, but I prefer to make up my own mind about these things.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-29-2014, 06:15 AM
 
6,795 posts, read 6,594,417 times
Reputation: 5411
Houston is a pretty ugly city...honestly. I don't hear too many people calling Houston attractive. Not very well planned and sprawling.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S. > City vs. City
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top