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View Poll Results: New England vs Quebec and Maritimes
New England (CT, ME, MA, NH, RI, VT) 7 36.84%
Quebec and Maritiames (QC,NB, PE, NS, NL) 12 63.16%
Voters: 19. You may not vote on this poll

 
 
Old 04-29-2014, 09:03 AM
 
Location: Stockholm, Sweden
382 posts, read 508,623 times
Reputation: 181

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New England
Population: 14 million
Major cities: Boston, Providence, Hartford, Portland

Quebec and Maritimes
Population: 10 million
Major cities: Montreal, Quebec City, Halifax, St. John's

Region of comparable geography, population, cities (1 major and few minor centres) parallel history (New England and New France, even have a New Scotland), which one do you prefer? to live and to visit? Here're some sample criterias:

Climate
Outdoors
Lifestyle
Arts
Architecture
Design
Music
People
Cost of living
Education
Economy
Transportation
Politics
and etc...
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Old 04-29-2014, 12:04 PM
 
Location: M I N N E S O T A
14,805 posts, read 16,980,066 times
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Climate New England
Outdoors New England
Lifestyle New England
Arts No clue
Architecture New England
Design No clue
Music New England
People New England
Cost of living New England
Education New England
Economy New England
Transportation New England
Politics Neither
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Old 04-29-2014, 12:13 PM
 
Location: Boston
7,336 posts, read 15,298,585 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fikatid View Post
New England
Population: 14 million
Major cities: Boston, Providence, Hartford, Portland

Quebec and Maritimes
Population: 10 million
Major cities: Montreal, Quebec City, Halifax, St. John's

Region of comparable geography, population, cities (1 major and few minor centres) parallel history (New England and New France, even have a New Scotland), which one do you prefer? to live and to visit? Here're some sample criterias:

Climate
Outdoors
Lifestyle
Arts
Architecture
Design
Music
People
Cost of living
Education
Economy
Transportation
Politics
and etc...
Interesting comparison, and one I've played with a lot considering I live in New England and consider the Quebec + Maritimes (Quebec in particular) to be among my favorite regions in North America.

Climate- New England. Both are cold. Winters in the more populated regions of New England aren't as harsh as winters in the more populated regions of Quebec and the Maritimes. Winters in the sparsely populated northern parts of New England are downright frigid; but portions of northern Quebec are literally arctic. The flip side is that summers in Quebec and the Maritimes, while short, aren't as hot/muggy as New England's. I don't find New England's summers to be bad, but some may.

Outdoors- Tie. The Maritimes and Quebec have a stunning landscape and are heaven for winter sports enthusiasts. I'm a skier and New England has great ski areas. However, Mt. Tremblant in Quebec is widely regarded as the best resort in North Eastern North America. Quebec's Chic-Choc mountains offer the only real above treeline skiing East of the Rockies (I know, I know, Mt. Washington, Katahdin, and a few others have skiing, but the Chic-Chocs have more, have Snowcat service, and are better). On top of skiing, there's a lot of hunting, ice fishing, snowmobiling, etc. New England has all of that, but not nearly in the same quantities. On the other hand, there's no question that New England (especially Southern New England) is better for summer activities and water sports. There's a reason Southern Maine's beaches are overwhelmed with visitors from North of the border every summer. Both regions offer a great deal of hiking, kayaking, fishing, camping, etc.

Lifestyle- Tie. I am a city boy that likes to spend a good deal of time outdoors. Not the other way around. I think New England offers a bit more for someone who prefers urban areas to rural/ the outdoors. Montreal is a large, cosmopolitan city. Quebec City is one of my favorite places on earth. I love Halifax, and I prefer St John, New Brunswick to relatively close and similarly sized Portland, ME. But the Boston area is more expansive than Montreal, Providence is a bigger city than Quebec, and there are dozens of urban areas (some great, some not so great) in between. Beyond that, a good chunk of New England is part of Metropolitan New York. There are better transit options connecting the region. The climate allows for a lifestyle that's slightly more centered around being outside (not necessarily hiking, etc. but walking city streets, dining outdoors, etc.). That said, Quebec/Maritimes offers two distinctly different cultures. I think old world ties are more apparent in QC/M than in New England. Quebec is obvious, but Nova Scotia has a unique link to its Scottish Gaelic past. Neither region is lacking history, but I think it seeps into everyday life more in QC/M than in New England. When it comes to food, QC/M wins handily. Everything that's good about New England seafood exists in QC/M. In addition, Quebecois cuisine seamlessly blends French methods and tradition with Canadian ingredients and culture. Montreal has a food scene that could rival San Francisco. Quebec is one of my favorite places in the world to eat.

Arts- I don't know enough to argue this point.

Architecture- Quebec and the Maritimes. I think for historic, focal point architecture, QC/M wins. The cities and towns of the Maritimes often have dense historic cores that don't look too different than what you'll see in Portland, ME's Old Port or Portsmouth, NH's Market Square area. Lots of brick and a quaint, homey feel. It's charming. Quebec has a decidedly French influence. Quebec City's Old City could pass for a European city, as could Montreal's. Outside of the historic cores, Montreal and Quebec don't slack. Quebec has some awesome old industrial housing that's been turned into modern, attractive living spaces. Montreal has some grand neighborhoods (and some ugly ones). I would argue that New England's rural architecture is a little better. Outside of the historic cities and towns, many homes and businesses in QC/M aren't much to look at.

Design- As in fashion? If so, Quebec/Maritimes. Montreal has a bigger fashion influence and culture of local designers than most cities in North America. Boston and New England aren't known for their fashion or design chops.

Music- I think New England has a slight edge, although both are pretty influential. I can't forgive Quebec for Men Without Hats. Massachusetts alone has produced Aerosmith, the Pixies, James Taylor, and a host of other one hit wonders and bands that were at least briefly famous. Quebec is probably most notable for Celine Dion.

Cost of living- Quebec and the Maritimes are more affordable without a doubt.

Education- New England. There are great colleges and universities in Quebec and the Maritimes (McGill, most notably); but it's difficult to argue with a region that's home to Harvard, MIT, Brown, Yale, and Dartmouth and a host of other top flight schools.

Economy- Without looking at numbers, my guess is New England has the larger, stronger economy. The Boston area is a bit more influential than the Montreal area, and I think the secondary metros of Providence, Hartford, Portland, etc. all outshine their QC/M counterparts a bit. Having the Stamford/New Haven component of the NYC metro area in New England doesn't hurt either.

Transportation- New England. With all due respect to Quebec City's "Ecolobus" (one of my favorite transit loops anywhere), New England has a better, more expansive transit network of highways, railways, and airports (QC/M may have more/better ferry service). It's easier to get in/out of New England than it is to get to Quebec and the Maritimes. Montreal's subway is cleaner and quieter than Boston's, but the two are comparable in terms of passengers moved.



Overall, I would choose to live in New England. It's a bit more temperate, somewhat more urban, and I have roots here. That said, QC/M remains one of my favorite regions of the world to visit and if an opportunity arose, I wouldn't have trouble relocating.
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Old 04-29-2014, 01:52 PM
 
Location: Where Sunday shopping is banned in the USA
336 posts, read 303,310 times
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Quebec is amazing..... Love French
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Old 04-29-2014, 02:02 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
20,571 posts, read 25,620,517 times
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Not sure about grouping Quebec + Maritimes which are very different and Quebec is big and cohesive enough to be compared on its own, but I will give it a shot...

Climate: New England
Outdoors: Very close but edge to Quebec and the Maritimes because even many of the most spectacular places can be blissfully uncrowded here
Lifestyle: Quebec (I like the mix of European/North American lifestyle a lot; New England and also the Maritimes are more classic North American)
Arts: most people on this forum will know New England's production a lot better and it's more accessible to them, but Quebec has huge cultural industries of its own; similar to what you'd expect as a national entertainment and cultural industry in a country of 8 million people
Architecture: agree with what another poster said; Montreal and Quebec City are pretty darn good and especially unique in this respect, but New England has tons of gorgeous small towns
Design: Montreal in particular is a very hip and design-oriented place
Music: most people on this forum will know New England's production a lot better and it's more accessible to them, but Quebec has a huge music industry of its own; similar to what you'd expect as a national industry in a country of 8 million people
People: Quebecers and Maritimers are quite different so it's hard to say; in many ways Maritimers are probably more similar to New Englanders than they are to Quebecers
Cost of living: Quebec and Maritimes (mostly because of real estate)
Education: New England
Economy: New England
Transportation: New England
Politics: depends on what you want; if you want interesting, colourful politics then Quebec is the place; if you want something more like back and predictable, then pick New England.
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Old 04-29-2014, 03:58 PM
 
Location: Stockholm, Sweden
382 posts, read 508,623 times
Reputation: 181
Thanks for the comments! Very interesting insights from locals I would have a hard time choosing between the two places myself!

I thought that perhaps the Maritimes is more similar to New England or Ontario but then with the Arcadian heritage (though they are mostly a legacy in a large part of the Maritimes nowadays no?) and a tribute to the old auld alliance, with New England vs New France/Scotland I thought maybe it would make an interesting comparison lol! Completely arbitrary though!
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Old 04-30-2014, 03:59 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
20,571 posts, read 25,620,517 times
Reputation: 8094
Quote:
Originally Posted by fikatid View Post
Thanks for the comments! Very interesting insights from locals I would have a hard time choosing between the two places myself!

I thought that perhaps the Maritimes is more similar to New England or Ontario but then with the Arcadian heritage (though they are mostly a legacy in a large part of the Maritimes nowadays no?) and a tribute to the old auld alliance, with New England vs New France/Scotland I thought maybe it would make an interesting comparison lol! Completely arbitrary though!
French-speaking Acadians are about 15% of the population of the Maritimes. Their proportion varies from province to province though: they are one-third of the population in New Brunswick and make up close to 100% of the population in some regions there. In Nova Scotia and Prince Edward they are about 5% of the population.

''Acadianity'' has only minor relevance for most English-speaking Maritimers and in the main cities of the region, with the exception of Moncton where they are 40% of the population and the city is also borders majority Acadian rural areas.
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Old 04-30-2014, 08:30 PM
 
Location: New Mexico --> Vermont in 2019
9,042 posts, read 17,301,151 times
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I really want to go bike riding in Prince Edward Island and bar/pub hopping in St John's, Newfoundland. Both are high up on the bucket list ranking. Newfoundland sitting at the edge of the continent just sounds like a totally intriguing place to visit. I imagine chatting it up with the Newfies must be a total hoot as well.
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