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Old 05-01-2014, 12:41 PM
 
Location: Syracuse, New York
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Wonder if there's a connection between the percentage of people who want to leave a state and the number of states that border that state.

Illinois has a lot of bordering states. Oregon and Maine don't have many bordering states.
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Old 05-01-2014, 03:02 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
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Illinois has taxes that are through the roof, a lousy job market, little to no natural beauty (central IL from Terre Haute IN to the Mississippi is the most boring stretch of land I've ever driven), and just not a very desirable place to be.

NV and RI both have lousy job markets. MS and LA have bad job markets and are dirt poor.

I'm really surprised by people wanted to leave NJ, MA, and CT. These are some of the best states in the country for high end jobs and building wealth.

I was near Boston for a month and spent my weekends in Maine and NH. Maine is one of the few hidden gems out there. NH has a "wild and free," natural vibe about it you can't get any many places. VT has a lot of the same qualities as NH.

I'm surprised more people don't want to leave the south. It is very difficult for normal people to make it with the suppressed wages.
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Old 05-01-2014, 03:09 PM
 
11,017 posts, read 21,594,719 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Emigrations View Post
Illinois has taxes that are through the roof, a lousy job market, little to no natural beauty (central IL from Terre Haute IN to the Mississippi is the most boring stretch of land I've ever driven), and just not a very desirable place to be.

NV and RI both have lousy job markets. MS and LA have bad job markets and are dirt poor.

I'm really surprised by people wanted to leave NJ, MA, and CT. These are some of the best states in the country for high end jobs and building wealth.

I was near Boston for a month and spent my weekends in Maine and NH. Maine is one of the few hidden gems out there. NH has a "wild and free," natural vibe about it you can't get any many places. VT has a lot of the same qualities as NH.

I'm surprised more people don't want to leave the south. It is very difficult for normal people to make it with the suppressed wages.
Taxes through the roof? It's normally right in the middle of taxation when comparing all states. Sales taxes are roughly on par (in Chicago at least) with other large cities. The state has high property taxes although the city of Chicago for the moment has fairly middle to even low taxes. I've never paid more than around 1%. Income taxes are a flat 5% which isn't outstanding.


Anyway, the whole poll makes more sense when you see how they phrased the question. “Regardless of whether you will move, if you had the opportunity, would you like to move to another state, or would you rather remain in your current state?”

I mean I'm not planning or looking to leave Chicago, but I would answer yes, regardless of if I plan on it, if I had an opportunity would I move to another state? Sure - why not try something new? You only live once.

I think that would explain that even the lowest state still had a 33% "yes" answer. Doesn't mean they want to LEAVE their state, just that they're open to trying a new one.
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Old 05-01-2014, 03:14 PM
 
Location: Upper West Side, Manhattan, NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Emigrations View Post
Illinois has taxes that are through the roof, a lousy job market, little to no natural beauty (central IL from Terre Haute IN to the Mississippi is the most boring stretch of land I've ever driven), and just not a very desirable place to be.
The taxes for Illinois that are high are the property tax and sales tax though not the highest in the nation for either. The income tax rate is not that bad. If you move there and don't own property, it's not that bad at all. Of course, a place like Texas where you pay 0% on income tax will be better, but most of the higher tax stuff in IL comes from owning property. I don't own property right now and pay my income taxes and then sales tax. That's it - and I don't think those are insanely high compared to other places. It's higher but not by something like 100%.

The job market thing - depends on what market you are in. I actually work in the tech field - I get contacted on LinkedIn weekly by people looking to hire me away. My company hired a bunch of new people last year in my division for an increase of probably about 40% staff within a year. In fact, I am involved in hiring people - I interviewed a handful of people a week ago (most of them were not from the state or even the midwest) and have more coming up soon.

If you are educated in the Chicago area and have experience, you are pretty good. In the last few years, we have had a few RAs and all of those people were able to find new jobs in the area before their last day. The higher unemployment rate basically comes from people who don't have a college or vocational degree. I honestly can't name a single friend of mine who is currently unemployed. I had a friend who was this summer - but he was able to find work and his salary actually increased by about $15K/year to the new job.
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Old 05-01-2014, 03:52 PM
 
Location: SF Bay Area
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Originally Posted by Chicago60614 View Post
Anyway, the whole poll makes more sense when you see how they phrased the question. “Regardless of whether you will move, if you had the opportunity, would you like to move to another state, or would you rather remain in your current state?”

I mean I'm not planning or looking to leave Chicago, but I would answer yes, regardless of if I plan on it, if I had an opportunity would I move to another state? Sure - why not try something new? You only live once.

I think that would explain that even the lowest state still had a 33% "yes" answer. Doesn't mean they want to LEAVE their state, just that they're open to trying a new one.
Sure but Illinois still had one of the highest, 2nd highest behind NV, percentage of people planning (Extremely/very/somewhat likely to move) on leaving. Most of the top states overall corresponded to most of the top states for those actually planning on moving. Then of course other states had significantly lower % of people that wouldn't move even if given the chance.

I'm actually surprised CA ranked about average, thought more people would want to move away due to the COL.
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Old 05-01-2014, 04:05 PM
 
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North Carolina probably has a lot of Southerners who are looking to escape those incoming gawddamn Yankees.
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Old 05-01-2014, 07:09 PM
 
Location: Prince George's County, Maryland
6,212 posts, read 7,044,436 times
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Originally Posted by rnc2mbfl View Post
and conversely, i suspect that nc's numbers are buoyed by the recent tea party takeover of nc's government.
+2
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Old 05-01-2014, 10:28 PM
 
Location: South Beach and DT Raleigh
11,548 posts, read 17,912,885 times
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Originally Posted by sav858 View Post
Not sure what that really matters since that would apply to all states, was more thinking of state and local taxes which I assume were less back then in CA.
Yes. They were less because there was more federal support. There was more federal support because the rich were pumping more into the economy instead of their own wallets. There was less demand on federal programs because more companies were providing benefits and pensions to their employees. Companies provided more to their employees because the government punished greed more severely with much higher tax rates on top incomes. The rich were more inclined to grow their businesses and support their employees rather than to give the money to the government.
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Old 05-01-2014, 10:30 PM
 
Location: South Beach and DT Raleigh
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Originally Posted by LordHomunculus View Post
North Carolina probably has a lot of Southerners who are looking to escape those incoming gawddamn Yankees.
If that were the case, NC wouldn't have grown so rapidly for the last 40 or 50 years.
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Old 05-01-2014, 11:30 PM
 
Location: Paris
1,671 posts, read 1,921,838 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rnc2mbfl View Post
If that were the case, NC wouldn't have grown so rapidly for the last 40 or 50 years.
Depends how many other people were flooding in there....
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