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Old 05-07-2014, 05:46 AM
 
Location: Charlotte
572 posts, read 968,157 times
Reputation: 412

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Quote:
Originally Posted by 8to32characters View Post
While that may be true to a certain extent, those cities are located in fiercely anti-gay states.

FTR, I don't believe a city can be "gay-friendly" when it's located in anti-gay state such as Georgia or North Carolina. TBH, I have difficulty reasoning and take issue with posters on this forum who constantly recommend these alleged "gay-friendly" cities such as Atlanta, Dallas, et. al. in anti-gay states because I don't understand why you would want someone to be a second-class citizen or less than equal.

Besides, there are some smaller town and exurban communities on the fringes of the Atlanta and Raleigh-Durham metro areas that are incredibly backwards.
As a gay man living in one of those "fiercely anti-gay states", I take an even bigger issue when someone labels a giant segment of a states population as anti gay.
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Old 05-07-2014, 09:20 AM
 
1,640 posts, read 1,910,890 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by carolinablue View Post
As a gay man living in one of those "fiercely anti-gay states", I take an even bigger issue when someone labels a giant segment of a states population as anti gay.
Regardless of how you feel, you're still a second-class citizen if you're LGBT and reside in NC, GA, et al. In those states, you can be discriminated against in employment, housing, martial rights/benefits, etc.
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Old 05-07-2014, 09:54 AM
 
Location: Charlotte
572 posts, read 968,157 times
Reputation: 412
Quote:
Originally Posted by 8to32characters View Post
Regardless of how you feel, you're still a second-class citizen if you're LGBT and reside in NC, GA, et al. In those states, you can be discriminated against in employment, housing, martial rights/benefits, etc.
Besides the fact that I have never encountered any of those issues, I am not sure what you are getting at. Should all the gays just up and move to New York City? Should we all wear second class citizen labels if we don't live in a state that allows gay marriage? No, I think I'll stick around and fight the good fight. I've got thick skin. I don't walk around with a second class citizen label on that for sure. A lot has happened in ten years with this issue, and pretty fast. Discrimination is everywhere, a law isn't going to erase it. As for the topic, Raleigh-Durham is pretty progressive and I would consider the area a good option, definitely worth looking into.
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Old 05-07-2014, 01:43 PM
 
559 posts, read 583,091 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by carolinablue View Post
Besides the fact that I have never encountered any of those issues, I am not sure what you are getting at. Should all the gays just up and move to New York City? Should we all wear second class citizen labels if we don't live in a state that allows gay marriage? No, I think I'll stick around and fight the good fight. I've got thick skin. I don't walk around with a second class citizen label on that for sure. A lot has happened in ten years with this issue, and pretty fast. Discrimination is everywhere, a law isn't going to erase it. As for the topic, Raleigh-Durham is pretty progressive and I would consider the area a good option, definitely worth looking into.
Hi carolinablue. Do you feel that any strides are being made in North Carolina regarding gay rights? A friend of mine who's gay lived in NC for several years. But she chose to move a couple of years ago after Amendment 1 was passed. She had always felt the state was a little too conservative for her, but she liked the area in general so she stayed. But after Amendment 1 was passed, she felt that she could no longer in good conscience remain a resident of NC. She felt that the passage of the amendment was essentially writing discrimination into the NC constitution. I'm curious to hear your opinion on how you think gay rights is progressing (or not) in your state.
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Old 05-07-2014, 03:50 PM
 
2,825 posts, read 2,995,686 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gibbsnm View Post
Hi carolinablue. Do you feel that any strides are being made in North Carolina regarding gay rights? A friend of mine who's gay lived in NC for several years. But she chose to move a couple of years ago after Amendment 1 was passed. She had always felt the state was a little too conservative for her, but she liked the area in general so she stayed. But after Amendment 1 was passed, she felt that she could no longer in good conscience remain a resident of NC. She felt that the passage of the amendment was essentially writing discrimination into the NC constitution. I'm curious to hear your opinion on how you think gay rights is progressing (or not) in your state.
Not to bud in or anything, but North Carolina has definitely taken a sharp turn to the right recently. For ex, Amendment 1 and our current governor, Pat McCrory. North Carolina has always been pretty conservative, but along with Virginia, it's been the most progressive of the southern states throughout the years.
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Old 05-07-2014, 07:23 PM
 
418 posts, read 419,879 times
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I know that this is an old post but I would ignore the lists and statistics for IT. IT is a very broad field so who knows where people are getting their information. The reason that I say this is because my husband and I are in the same boat when it comes to looking for cities that are good for tech jobs. If you are a developer you can probably find a job anywhere but the other fields in IT are different. Just ignore the silly lists that cities get paid to be on and determine where he can get the best job.
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Old 05-07-2014, 10:40 PM
 
Location: Richmond, VA, from Boston
1,399 posts, read 1,959,709 times
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Richmond is pretty gay friendly
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Old 05-08-2014, 10:54 AM
 
559 posts, read 583,091 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JayJayCB View Post
Not to bud in or anything, but North Carolina has definitely taken a sharp turn to the right recently. For ex, Amendment 1 and our current governor, Pat McCrory. North Carolina has always been pretty conservative, but along with Virginia, it's been the most progressive of the southern states throughout the years.
Thanks JayJayCB. That was the impression I had as an outsider looking in, but it's good to hear from someone who actually lives there.
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Old 05-08-2014, 11:16 AM
 
1,462 posts, read 1,506,920 times
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I somewhat understand & respect the point the gay from NC is making, but I still find it a little ridiculous (however, I say this as a straight male).... I mean NC almost quite literally doubled down on banning gay marriage - they essentially took something that is already illegal, then made it illegal to ever make that illegal thing legal.

I've never been a gay person, but I think that would be too much for me to overcome if I was. As respectable and commendable as it is to "fight the good fight" & to be thick skinned, sometimes some people are just awful / awfully misguided.
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Old 05-08-2014, 03:11 PM
 
2,825 posts, read 2,995,686 times
Reputation: 1605
Quote:
Originally Posted by gibbsnm View Post
Thanks JayJayCB. That was the impression I had as an outsider looking in, but it's good to hear from someone who actually lives there.
No problem! In North Carolina, there is a huge urban/rural divide. The rural areas are all very conservative and that has always been the case. However, the urban areas are moderately liberal in most cases. I'd say Asheville, Chapel Hill, and Durham are the most liberal towns in NC.
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