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Old 05-02-2014, 03:25 PM
 
Location: DC
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Out of all of those. It's pittsburgh and only pittsburgh. It has one major advantage the other cities do not have, and that is carnigie mellon, which is a major technology school. It may end up being a smaller city then it is now, but unlike the others listed it will be a very healthy and well educated city. The others...I cannot say that.
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Old 05-02-2014, 03:50 PM
 
Location: Cleveland
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DistrictSonic View Post
Out of all of those. It's pittsburgh and only pittsburgh. It has one major advantage the other cities do not have, and that is carnigie mellon, which is a major technology school. It may end up being a smaller city then it is now, but unlike the others listed it will be a very healthy and well educated city. The others...I cannot say that.
Umm... According to US News college rankings, Washington University in St. Louis is ranked #14 in the nation, Carnegie Melon is ranked #23, and Case Western Reserve is ranked #37. Seems like at least 3 of these cities have highly ranked universities.
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Old 05-02-2014, 04:22 PM
 
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Also, Buffalo is very close to Pittsburgh in educational attainment: http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2...reas.html?_r=0

The Business Journals' brainpower rankings for 102 major markets - The Business Journals
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Old 05-02-2014, 04:30 PM
 
52,624 posts, read 75,451,274 times
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Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
Pittsburgh has very different demographics than the other cities listed. Let me list the non-Hispanic white population of each and you'll see what I mean:

Detroit - 7.8%
Cleveland - 33.4%
Milwaukee - 37.0%
Saint Louis - 42.9%
Buffalo - 45.8%
Cincinnati - 48.1%
Pittsburgh - 64.8%

Pittsburgh is far, far whiter than any other medium-sized to large city outside of the Pacific Northwest. The black population is around a quarter, and the Latino population is largely absent. There are more Asians than Latinos in Pittsburgh now, largely due to the influence of the universities.

The history of why Pittsburgh stayed so white is complicated. If you look back to the 20s, Pittsburgh didn't have any less black people percentage wise than Detroit. But industry peaked earlier here, and there were no direct rail lines to the U.S. south, so there wasn't a big demand for black migrants.

With a smaller black population, there was also less white flight than in other rust-belt cities (although it did affect portions of the city strongly), as a result, Pittsburgh maintained more working-class white neighborhoods within the urban core than was normal. It also meant a 50% decline in population felt far "milder" in Pittsburgh as elsewhere, as instead of white families being replaced by black families of the same size or larger, the white families shrunk in size dramatically.

Fast forward to the 1980s, when the bottom fell out on steel, and things got really dire for Pittsburgh. An exodus of younger people left, but many who were old enough retired early and stayed in their homes, leading to a city full of empty nesters. And Pittsburgh's economy got bad just as Latinos moved to the U.S. in large numbers, which is why they never came here.

So, by 2000 or so, you had a city with a large number of historic, reasonably intact neighborhoods with relatively low crime. And a real-estate market which was dirt cheap because there were so many houses coming onto the market due to the death (and/or nursing home admission) of their previous owners. All that was needed was a semi-stable job market, and in bits and pieces it's come together with a combination of education, medicine, and finance. As a result the city continues to attract transplants (I was one of them) who are steadily gentrifying a wide swathe of the city (but gentrifying in a good sense for the most part, as instead of poor minorities being displaced, they're stopping neighborhoods from going into terminal decline).

I should post a caveat that I'm not saying Pittsburgh is better because it's a whiter city. I'm only saying that it suffered relatively less from the legacy of white flight and urban disinvestment than many other rust-belt cities. It's been noted elsewhere that for whatever reason, "hip" cities (DC excepted) tend to be ones with a low black population, and Pittsburgh in this sense fits into the company of places like Portland, Seattle, Boston, and Minneapolis perfectly.
I think another reason for Pittsburgh's demographics is due to the spread out nature of Black migration to the Pittsburgh area/Western PA. Think about and look at the demographics of Aliquippa, Beaver Falls, Homestead, Washington, Rochester, Duquesne, Clairton, Donora, McKeesport, Jeannette, Midland, Ambridge, Monessen, Charleroi, Farrell, Hermitage, Sharon and some others with at least a notable long time Black population/community in the area.

Last edited by ckhthankgod; 05-02-2014 at 04:42 PM..
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Old 05-02-2014, 07:23 PM
 
Location: The canyon (with my pistols and knife)
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Originally Posted by Cleverfield View Post
Umm... According to US News college rankings, Washington University in St. Louis is ranked #14 in the nation, Carnegie Melon is ranked #23, and Case Western Reserve is ranked #37. Seems like at least 3 of these cities have highly ranked universities.
I was about to say that Washington University and Case Western Reserve University are no slouches. With that said, the real advantage that Pittsburgh has over Cleveland and St. Louis is that it has a larger presence of higher education. According to the Carnegie Classifications of Institutions of Higher Education, which measures the amount of research activity at colleges and universities in the United States, Pittsburgh has two universities classified as having "very high" research activity (University of Pittsburgh, Carnegie Mellon University), and a third classified as having "high" research activity (Duquesne University). By comparison, Cleveland has only one university of "very high" research activity (Case Western Reserve University) and a second of "high" activity (Cleveland State University), and the same is true of St. Louis (Washington University and St. Louis University, respectively).

On top of that, Pittsburgh's three major universities are all very close to each other. The Pitt and Carnegie Mellon campuses are literally right next to each other, and the Duquesne campus is just a mile and a half to the west. On the other hand, the Cleveland State and Case Western Reserve campuses are about four miles apart, and so are the St. Louis and Washington campuses. Because of this, part of Pittsburgh's East End feels like a large college town placed inside a large city, whereas that kind of ambiance in Cleveland and St. Louis is more limited due to the separation of their major universities. And the irony in Cleveland is that the west side is the nicest part of the city, but it's located far away from either of the major universities, which are basically separated from each other by the ghetto.


Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
According to the New York Times list, Buffalo had a higher percentage of college-educated adults in 1970 than Pittsburgh did, but now Pittsburgh has a higher percentage. It's also worth noting that Pittsburgh's percentage is the average of two extremes. The young adult population (25-44) is college-educated at a much higher rate than both the national and metropolitan averages, and the elderly population (65+) is college-educated at a much lower rate than the national and metropolitan averages. I'm aware that Buffalo is more educated than before, and it tracks more closely with Pittsburgh than it does with Cleveland or Detroit in that regard, but I also know it's a step below Pittsburgh in both the percentage and the rate of increase. Still above average, which is a good thing.


Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
I think another reason for Pittsburgh's demographics is due to the spread out nature of Black migration to the Pittsburgh area/Western PA. Think about and look at the demographics of Aliquippa, Beaver Falls, Homestead, Washington, Rochester, Duquesne, Clairton, Donora, McKeesport, Jeannette, Midland, Ambridge, Monessen, Charleroi, Farrell, Hermitage, Sharon and some others with at least a notable long time Black population/community in the area.
Aside from Washington, those are all towns that used to be heavily industrialized, and like I said before, once the middle class grew, more people had the means to move out of those towns and into the suburbs. This left small pockets of ghettoization up and down the river valleys, but most notably the Monongahela River Valley. This is also why neither Washington County nor Westmoreland County have especially high median household incomes despite the growth of upper-middle-class outer-ring suburbs adjacent to Allegheny County, because the heart of the moribund mid-Mon Valley includes towns like Monongahela, Donora and Charleroi in Washington County, and Monessen, North Belle Vernon and Rostraver Township in Westmoreland County. Further up the river, the towns of Belle Vernon and Brownsville augment the decline in distant Fayette County.

Last edited by Craziaskowboi; 05-02-2014 at 07:32 PM..
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