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View Poll Results: Are Land Lock Cities Growing Faster Then Ocean Side Cities?
Yes 28 65.12%
No 15 34.88%
Voters: 43. You may not vote on this poll

 
 
Old 05-05-2014, 09:36 PM
 
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Why is it always so much hatred toward the south anyone know?
Driving around Dallas reminds of the Northeast with all the urban and highrises buildings that goes from downtown to uptown so really?
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Old 05-05-2014, 09:46 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Standard111 View Post
Geez, never knew that Chicago was on an ocean. The things you learn on C-D.

And Houston, which is on an ocean, has the fastest numerical growth of any metro in the U.S. How does that square with your theory?
Common sense what have told you a large body of water ''Lake Michigan'',duhh!!!!!!!
I have to go in detail for some who think slower then others.
Cities that are on large bodies of water good grief!!!!!!!!
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Old 05-06-2014, 01:28 AM
 
Location: SF Bay Area
1,316 posts, read 1,265,287 times
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Cheap housing costs is the #1 reason. If it wasn't for that we would be comparing Houston to cities like St. Louis, Detroit, Twin Cities, etc. Every city/region has to have an incentive to draw future growth. In the case of landlocked cities, healthy job market and low cost of living will draw residents to even the most lackluster/harsh weather climate cities.
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Old 05-06-2014, 01:41 AM
 
Location: Allendale MI
2,532 posts, read 1,821,258 times
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Isn't NYC growing faster than all other cities in real numbers?
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Old 05-06-2014, 01:49 AM
 
11,898 posts, read 9,620,628 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Standard111 View Post
The Gulf of Mexico is part of the Ocean. Give me a break already. And Houston metro area is directly on the Gulf of Mexico, there is no "50 miles" to the gulf.

If you want to be that hyper-technical, then we can say that Tokyo, or New York, or Hong Kong aren't on the ocean, because they are in protected harbors, not the open ocean.
But New York is because Queens and Brooklyn have open ocean beaches and oceanfront residences, businesses, etc. It also has harbors, rivers, and tidal straits.
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Old 05-06-2014, 09:03 AM
 
Location: Milwaukee
1,314 posts, read 1,644,869 times
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It's also harder to sprawl when at least one direction is entirely unlivable/undevelopable due to a sea. As mentioned, these are older cities because people generally prefer being right by the water than not being right by the water, for practical as well as aesthetic reasons. Cost/jobs is a major issue, there are more of them (and cheaper housing) out in landlocked cities than mature ports at this point. The balance may well swing back, could happen at any point.
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Old 05-06-2014, 09:13 AM
 
Location: In the heights
20,128 posts, read 21,737,714 times
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I've heard inland sea for the Great Lakes, but I haven't heard inland ocean. That is very exciting. Did someone just dump a metric crapton of salt into them?
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Old 05-06-2014, 06:31 PM
 
1,064 posts, read 1,508,598 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OyCrumbler View Post
I've heard inland sea for the Great Lakes, but I haven't heard inland ocean. That is very exciting. Did someone just dump a metric crapton of salt into them?
You get the picture but anyway if a native of Chicago didn't understand what I was saying they do now!
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Old 05-08-2014, 07:33 PM
 
1,640 posts, read 1,907,797 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GatsbyGatz View Post
Landlocked cities are growing rapidly because of class divide. More people are getting poorer, so they have to move to the dirt cheap inland landlocked land because they can't afford the coast.
Not necessarily--lots of people who move to corporate hubs in the Sun Belt such as Atlanta, Charlotte, Dallas, Denver, Phoenix, et al. are corporate relos.

At 1,350 square miles, Florida has the second longest coastline of any state in the country after Alaska. Florida is also home to more people than Arizona, Nevada, New Mexico, and South Carolina--four other popular Sun Belt states--combined, refuting your point about lots of people not being able to afford the coast.
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Old 05-08-2014, 07:44 PM
 
1,064 posts, read 1,508,598 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 8to32characters View Post
Not necessarily--lots of people who move to corporate hubs in the Sun Belt such as Atlanta, Charlotte, Dallas, Denver, Phoenix, et al. are corporate relos.

At 1,350 square miles, Florida has the second longest coastline of any state in the country after Alaska. Florida is also home to more people than Arizona, Nevada, New Mexico, and South Carolina--four other popular Sun Belt states--combined, refuting your point about lots of people not being able to afford the coast.
That makes a whole lot of sense and the land lock cities are fresher and newers in the modern age!
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