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View Poll Results: Most transformed and improved city cores
New York City 20 9.43%
Los Angeles 40 18.87%
Chicago 32 15.09%
Dallas 17 8.02%
Houston 14 6.60%
Philadelphia 29 13.68%
Washington 38 17.92%
Miami 17 8.02%
Atlanta 25 11.79%
Boston 9 4.25%
San Francisco 8 3.77%
Phoenix 6 2.83%
Riverside/San Bernadino 2 0.94%
Detroit 10 4.72%
Seattle 17 8.02%
Minneapolis 13 6.13%
San Diego 7 3.30%
Tampa 3 1.42%
St. Louis 9 4.25%
Baltimore 9 4.25%
Denver 22 10.38%
Pittsburgh 20 9.43%
Charlotte 11 5.19%
Portland 8 3.77%
San Antonio 4 1.89%
Orlando 4 1.89%
Sacramento 5 2.36%
Cincinnati 13 6.13%
Cleveland 25 11.79%
Kansas City 10 4.72%
Multiple Choice Poll. Voters: 212. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 05-28-2014, 07:12 PM
 
Location: Westside Grand Rapids
3,570 posts, read 3,044,803 times
Reputation: 5494

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Drewcifer View Post
I think most people on this forum are too young to remember or realize just how utterly dysfunctional New York was in the early '90s. The gritty New York of the '70s and '80s continued on for the first half of the '90s. Times Square was the sleaziest place in America, you could buy anything there. If the time frame begins at 1994 then we are talking about the city Guiliani inherited. The version of NY that we know now did not exist then. The transformation wasn't new buildings (although it has had that), it was a new social fabric (in some ways better, in other ways worse). The old New York had more in common with pre-gentrification Philly than the NY of today. DC went through a similar transformation. I think those are the two most changed cities.


Every Major city that had been a major city went through decline for the four decades after WW2. In the 90's the baby boomer dream of living in the suburbs and taking the freeway to work/mall/box store started to decline. At that point every major city that had experienced the 40 year decline started seeing that trend reversed as GenX'ers discovered the urban cores their parents had sheltered them from, and reinvestment has ensued since. I find this true with very few exceptions. I know the situation in New York was bad and had a lot of notoriety, but i'm not sure that it was any worse than most of the cities experiencing the same thing.

I vote for DC
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Old 10-08-2014, 08:47 PM
 
Location: East Central Pennsylvania/ Chicago for 6yrs.
2,539 posts, read 2,313,853 times
Reputation: 1483
These are pictures of Chicago's East Side. East of Michigan Ave and a bit north of the Chicago river MOSTLY SOUTH of it. The EXACT SAME LAKE SHORE DRIVE BRIDGE is in the CENTER of BOTH PHOTOS. Just 1st one is late 70s and looks east. The few year old one looks west.

I'd say its a huge change . Just a portion of downtowns core....

I don't mind reopening the thread.....
Attached Thumbnails
Most improved and transformed city cores-new-east-side-before-1980.jpg   Most improved and transformed city cores-chicago-east-side-north-south-chicago  

Last edited by steeps; 10-08-2014 at 09:13 PM..
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Old 10-08-2014, 11:18 PM
 
172 posts, read 202,304 times
Reputation: 130
Seattle in 1975:

https://c2.staticflickr.com/6/5244/5...0d279a744e.jpg

Seattle now:

http://ww4.hdnux.com/photos/32/01/02.../3/960x540.jpg

See the insane amount of cranes and increased density?

Last edited by JMT; 10-09-2014 at 07:43 AM..
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Old 10-09-2014, 01:13 AM
 
Location: The canyon (with my pistols and knife)
12,996 posts, read 17,136,359 times
Reputation: 14301
Quote:
Originally Posted by Drewcifer View Post
I think most people on this forum are too young to remember or realize just how utterly dysfunctional New York was in the early '90s. The gritty New York of the '70s and '80s continued on for the first half of the '90s. Times Square was the sleaziest place in America, you could buy anything there. If the time frame begins at 1994 then we are talking about the city Guiliani inherited. The version of NY that we know now did not exist then. The transformation wasn't new buildings (although it has had that), it was a new social fabric (in some ways better, in other ways worse). The old New York had more in common with pre-gentrification Philly than the NY of today. DC went through a similar transformation. I think those are the two most changed cities.
Back in the summer of 1992, my family took a three-week vacation to Long Island when my father was doing research at Brookhaven National Laboratory. We spent most of the vacation between Islip and Montauk Point, but we did take two day trips into New York. The instant we emerged from the Queens/Midtown Tunnel in the heart of Manhattan, we saw a homeless guy panhandling while the cars waited at the stoplight. He tried doing dances and making children laugh for spare change. On the way down to the World Trade Center, half the alleys we saw had homeless people living in them, or at least evidence thereof. There was trash pretty much everywhere. On the way back up to Times Square, my father instructed everybody in the family minivan not to look at the people with the squeegees. If you looked at them, they'd try to clean your windows expecting spare change, and if you turned your windshield wipers on them, they'd damage them and/or your windshield. New York was very rough and tumble back in the early 1990s.

Fast-forward to 1998, when my family took another trip to Long Island, we took another day trip into New York, and we were amazed at how much cleaner it was. The entire time we drove around Manhattan, we only saw one homeless person the entire time. There was a lot less trash laying around too.
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Old 10-09-2014, 06:24 AM
 
9,588 posts, read 10,927,466 times
Reputation: 2119
From a pure factual basis, the answer is going to be DC. Many cities sat vacant from a population standpoint, however, the buildings were still there. I don't think any city in the nation comes close to the amount of new buildings DC has built on vacant land or under utilized land like auto body shops etc. DC has added close to 100,000 people in a decade and the city is only 61 square miles.
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Old 10-09-2014, 07:07 AM
 
338 posts, read 345,242 times
Reputation: 289
Quote:
Originally Posted by MDAllstar View Post
From a pure factual basis, the answer is going to be DC. Many cities sat vacant from a population standpoint, however, the buildings were still there. I don't think any city in the nation comes close to the amount of new buildings DC has built on vacant land or under utilized land like auto body shops etc. DC has added close to 100,000 people in a decade and the city is only 61 square miles.
Does anyone have before and after aerial pictures of DC. I think that would be intersting.
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Old 10-09-2014, 11:48 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles
5,257 posts, read 12,570,359 times
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The biggest TRANSFORMATION has to be DTLA. The downtown/core residential population has quadrupled since the early 90s. National and international magazines, newspapers and blogs have taken notice. I can't think of one major dt that has come from the lowest of the low to what it is today and beyond. Maybe Detroit. It's improving but not as much as DTLA.
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Old 10-09-2014, 02:11 PM
 
9,588 posts, read 10,927,466 times
Reputation: 2119
Quote:
Originally Posted by pwright1 View Post
The biggest TRANSFORMATION has to be DTLA. The downtown/core residential population has quadrupled since the early 90s. National and international magazines, newspapers and blogs have taken notice. I can't think of one major dt that has come from the lowest of the low to what it is today and beyond. Maybe Detroit. It's improving but not as much as DTLA.
The comparison is asking about the urban core, not downtown. That's probably why people are saying DC. If we are taking about urban core, has any city built as much as DC since the 1990s?
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Old 10-09-2014, 03:26 PM
 
Location: East Central Pennsylvania/ Chicago for 6yrs.
2,539 posts, read 2,313,853 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MDAllstar View Post
The comparison is asking about the urban core, not downtown. That's probably why people are saying DC. If we are taking about urban core, has any city built as much as DC since the 1990s?
Urban --means belonging to, or relating to, a town or city
Core ---the most important or central part of something
Downtown ----places that are in or towards the center of a large town or city, where the shops and places of business are.

Sounds like downtown sure does mean its urban core too?
what does urban core mean for you VS what its downtown is?
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Old 10-09-2014, 03:48 PM
 
Location: New York City
1,219 posts, read 971,445 times
Reputation: 994
Washington, D.C. hands down!!!! Compared to just 10 years ago DC's core not only looks different but its also larger than it was before. No other city in America can compare. Not that its a bad thing but DC didn't boom like other cities did in the early 20th century so the core wasn't all that built up. The new deal happened to late and suburbanization kicked off right when DC was building up. So yea. But now the city is rebounding faster than all, there are cranes everywhere in DC.
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