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Old 05-15-2014, 10:43 PM
 
409 posts, read 437,795 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NorCal Dude View Post
Sf is a smaller city, its going to have a smaller sample size.

That's sf, a small time town. Like i said earlier, chicago is the big city.
Again, you seem to be confused. You don't seem to understand apples-to-apples comparisons.

Chicago and SF are about the same size. 9-10 million compared to 8 million.

Quote:
Originally Posted by NorCal Dude View Post
If you don't want to tango with the big kids, go tango with Boston, seattle, dc, and all the other small time towns.
You realize both SF and DC have bigger economies than Chicago, right? If they're "small time towns" than what is Chicago? A rural hamlet?

Boston isn't that much smaller either, not in population or economy.
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Old 05-15-2014, 10:50 PM
 
Location: Upper West Side, Manhattan, NYC
14,304 posts, read 17,941,912 times
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Why is City Data just about the only site that takes CSAs seriously? I really don't understand this. I can't think of many studies, publications, sites, etc that actually use CSA as their geographic unit.
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Old 05-15-2014, 11:01 PM
 
Location: Chicago, IL
200 posts, read 238,408 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NorCal Dude View Post
Sf is a smaller city, its going to have a smaller sample size.

That's sf, a small time town. Like i said earlier, chicago is the big city.

If you don't want to tango with the big kids, go tango with Boston, seattle, dc, and all the other small time towns.
That's laughable at best. All your posts are in some way or another meant to demean San Francisco because you're still bitter about moving away from your precious Chicago. SF is no more of a "small time town" than the Windy City. Besides, Chicago's metro population is closer to those "small time towns" than it is to either LA or NY.
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Old 05-15-2014, 11:17 PM
 
Location: Miami-Jax
5,796 posts, read 6,351,083 times
Reputation: 3135
Quote:
Originally Posted by genericusername View Post
I've been offered two jobs: one in Chicago, one in San Francisco. I live ~45 min from SF but haven't spent too much time there so I'm interested in hearing people's thoughts. Mid 20s, single, gay male here if that matters. I'm a native of Southern California so also curious to hear from any Californian's who have made the adjustment. Thank you!
I skipped posts 11-143, so I have no idea where this conversation has gone. My .02 though: Assuming you don't mind extremely cold winters, then I would suggest you pick whichever job pays you best relative to COL. So, if the SF salary is about 35% higher then take it. If it's not, go with Chicago. Unless you can't stand the cold winters at all, in which case you go with SF.
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Old 05-16-2014, 11:21 AM
 
5,807 posts, read 10,350,802 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marothisu View Post
Why is City Data just about the only site that takes CSAs seriously? I really don't understand this. I can't think of many studies, publications, sites, etc that actually use CSA as their geographic unit.
Because proximity, commutable distance creates interconnectedness that makes a CSA greater than the sum. of its parts.

The MSA is the one that is arbitrary. Either city proper only, and leave. any and all suburbs, or include the whole CSA
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Old 05-16-2014, 11:21 AM
 
Location: Upper West Side, Manhattan, NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tex?Il? View Post
Because proximity, commutable distance creates interconnectedness that makes a CSA greater than the sum. of its parts.

The MSA is the one that is arbitrary. Either city proper only, and leave. any and all suburbs, or include the whole CSA
Then explain why most studies use MSA instead of CSA.
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Old 05-16-2014, 11:23 AM
 
375 posts, read 451,422 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marothisu View Post
Why is City Data just about the only site that takes CSAs seriously? I really don't understand this. I can't think of many studies, publications, sites, etc that actually use CSA as their geographic unit.
Because in the case of SF using the MSA severely cuts off parts of its metro. Heck San Jose is on a commuter rail line into SF and is getting BART. That'd be as if Metra and the Chicago El both went to a city that wasn't included in its metro. Silly quirks in geography and county boundaries create the phenomena. Use the MSA for Chicago, not much different. Use the MSA for SF, you shortchange it like half of its metro. That is why. For most cities MSA and CSA aren't much different, which is why using MSA is fine in most cases.
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Old 05-16-2014, 11:30 AM
 
409 posts, read 437,795 times
Reputation: 260
Quote:
Originally Posted by marothisu View Post
Why is City Data just about the only site that takes CSAs seriously? I really don't understand this. I can't think of many studies, publications, sites, etc that actually use CSA as their geographic unit.
I'm pretty sure that the U.S. Census takes CSAs seriously. After all, they actually calculate the metric. And I'm pretty sure that the thousands of academics out there that use Census data take CSAs seriously.

I would rather ask "Why is C-D the only place that can't distinguish between a "city" and "city limits". A "city" is not defined as what technically exists within "city limits", as if Jacksonville is a big city and Paris a small one. A "city", in the colloquial sense, refers to a place, not a political boundary.
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Old 05-16-2014, 11:36 AM
 
Location: Upper West Side, Manhattan, NYC
14,304 posts, read 17,941,912 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Standard111 View Post
I'm pretty sure that the U.S. Census takes CSAs seriously. After all, they actually calculate the metric. And I'm pretty sure that the thousands of academics out there that use Census data take CSAs seriously.

I would rather ask "Why is C-D the only place that can't distinguish between a "city" and "city limits". A "city" is not defined as what technically exists within "city limits", as if Jacksonville is a big city and Paris a small one. A "city", in the colloquial sense, refers to a place, not a political boundary.
I'm not talking about the Census - obviously they take it seriously enough to measure. They measure pretty much every type of geographic unit. I'm asking why others do not take it seriously yet people on here do. Read most studies or reports, and they use MSA, not CSA. I used to talk to the guys at Brookings, for example, quite a bit. They used MSA a lot more than CSA.
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Old 05-16-2014, 12:00 PM
 
375 posts, read 451,422 times
Reputation: 179
Quote:
Originally Posted by marothisu View Post
I'm not talking about the Census - obviously they take it seriously enough to measure. They measure pretty much every type of geographic unit. I'm asking why others do not take it seriously yet people on here do. Read most studies or reports, and they use MSA, not CSA. I used to talk to the guys at Brookings, for example, quite a bit. They used MSA a lot more than CSA.
Because in most cases MSAs work really well. It is the few oddballs like LA, SF, and DC where MSA starts to fall apart. It is the crazy geography of SF Bay that does it in this case. Just look at the metro on google maps with satellite view.
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