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Old 05-18-2014, 07:08 AM
 
Location: A box below 59th
655 posts, read 522,890 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marothisu View Post
When was the last time you were in Chicago? Seems like awhile ago. There are many hip hole in the wall joints in the city, but if you stay downtown then sure, you'd have 75% of a point (though not 100% of a point as there are some that do exist downtown).
October-December last year. Stayed in River North, worked in and visited Logan Square, Lakeview, Lincoln Park, Roger's Park, Wicker Park, Pilsen, West Loop, South Loop, Hyde Park, Ukrainian Village, Uptown, Oldtown. All great places.

Rarely drove: walked almost everywhere, even in the freezing, soul-rending cold. Made a man out of me.

Quote:
The city is changing in that regard too big time and anybody who follows the "scene" would realize this if they can think.

(snip)

By the sound of you wrote, you probably didn't get out of the greater downtown area much at all. Only 4-5% of the population of the city actually lives in the downtown area. There's so much more to the city than those areas it's not even funny, but the average tourist will never see it.
Maybe you're right. Where does 'greater downtown' begin and end? Genuine question, no snark intended.

And listen: I love the place. Love it. I'd move there tomorrow, but my greencard won't be cleared till next year. But I went there immediately after two months in NY, and immediately before three months in SF. The ratio of sports bars filled with TVs to hole-in-the-wall places is much higher than either of those cities, even counting BX and Queens, and that needs to improve. From what you're saying, it is improving, and that's great to hear.

Funny thing is, I don't even care about chain stores and whatnot, which seem to bother many people here about Chicago. If a chain has produce or services as good as a pretentious artisan place, I couldn't give a s--t. If I see a franchised 'hole-in-the-wall' I like, I'll jolly well go there. As long as I have my licensed cafes, walkable distances, late-night commerce, nice architecture, crowded street life and 24 hour metro transit, the rest of the world can stroll on by.
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Old 05-18-2014, 10:11 AM
 
Location: Upper West Side, Manhattan, NYC
14,304 posts, read 17,964,136 times
Reputation: 6257
Fair enough - I think with street food though, the problem is you went during the cold months. Not saying it's common, but if you are in Pilsen or Little Village during a warmer time, you'll definitely see more. And also areas like Wicker Park have a few outside at nighttime. Yesterday in Little Village, I spotted probably 10-15 street food vendors in the matter of 2 blocks. They weren't necessarily cooking (the ones in Wicker Park at nighttime do for example), but you could still get your fix of tamales, agua fresca, chicarones, churros, etc.

Not sure how you could have done that too and not noticed all the local joints either, or was that a comment about parts of downtown?

Downtown to me (and many) is basically Loop, River North, Streeterville, part of the South Loop, part of the West Loop, and most of the Gold Coast. The thing about chains is that, yeah I agree, but in these areas of Chicago for food (example) there's not tons of chains. Once you get out of downtown, you'll find less and less in these neighborhoods. A starbucks here and there or a chipotle or two, but it's not very often especially in areas with money. You'll see it more for convenience stores and grocery stores yeah. In that case I agree with you it doesn't really matter. I don't care if I'm going to a mom and pop store to buy a jug of milk versus Mariano's. I think most people in town are with me on this who live in these areas - chain for restaurants/bars is a no but groceries and what not people don't care nearly as much.

But yeah regardless, the sports culture thing is getting less and less. It still definitely exists, don't get me wrong, but it's waning for sure big time lately. I think you only having one time period to see it probably haven't seen the change. If you were to come to Chicago 25 years ago, you would have seen a different city than today for sure.
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Old 05-19-2014, 01:39 PM
 
Location: Chicago (from pittsburgh)
3,678 posts, read 4,358,584 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marothisu View Post
Fair enough - I think with street food though, the problem is you went during the cold months..
And if it was Oct 2013-Dec 2013...it was the coldest winter in decades...
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Old 05-19-2014, 01:56 PM
 
Location: Upper West Side, Manhattan, NYC
14,304 posts, read 17,964,136 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ForYourLungsOnly View Post
And if it was Oct 2013-Dec 2013...it was the coldest winter in decades...
It was the coldest winter in the recorded history of the city (back to 1872). There was definitely less street life even for colder months. Not to say that Chicago has a lot of street vendors, but you won't find it in the gentrified neighborhoods. I've gotten street food though in Wicker Park, Logan Square, Pilsen, Little Village, and Albany Park before though. Little Village has the most of all of those places - Wicker Park maybe 2nd most around North/Milwaukee/Division. There's some street tacos, street sausage/hot dogs, and also a food truck is always there cooking up Jerk Chicken stuff late night. There's also some during the day though they're made elsewhere (i.e. random cupcake truck that i saw yesterday).
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Old 05-20-2014, 01:28 PM
 
587 posts, read 656,039 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hawaii4evr View Post
San Francisco has horrible weather. It's cold and cloudy pretty much all year long. I hate the 4 seasons climate too, but I would rather deal with frigid and snowy Chicago winters knowing that there are months of hot real summer weather ahead to enjoy the pool and lake. You can never swim in San Francisco unless it is an indoor pool.
Or you could simply head 10 miles North, South, or East of San Francisco and get the pool weather. Honestly, weather is important, and Chicago winters are terrible. It absolutely is a big deal when you have to wear 4 layers of clothing just to keep warm outside. Although SF's weather does bore me, there is plenty of warm weather in the Bay Area only a 20 minute car ride outside of SF.
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Old 05-20-2014, 01:30 PM
 
Location: Upper West Side, Manhattan, NYC
14,304 posts, read 17,964,136 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SFNative87 View Post
Or you could simply head 10 miles North, South, or East of San Francisco and get the pool weather. Honestly, weather is important, and Chicago winters are terrible. It absolutely is a big deal when you have to wear 4 layers of clothing just to keep warm outside. Although SF's weather does bore me, there is plenty of warm weather in the Bay Area only a 20 minute car ride outside of SF.
4 layers? ROFL. No. 2 is usually fine, and 3 will do it if it's super cold out and you don't know how to buy a good coat/jacket. The winters in Chicago are not a walk in the park but they're overstated. There's worse places in the lower 48 for winter.
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Old 05-20-2014, 01:39 PM
 
587 posts, read 656,039 times
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And the talk about Chicago being so crime ridden is really blown out of proportion! Yes, Chicago has a higher homicide rate, but its no worse than other Bay Area cities. Oakland, Richmond, Stockton- all have higher homicide rates than Chicago. Overall violent crime rates aren't available for Chicago but property crime rates are.

Chicago property crime rate per 100,000 people- 4,152.5
San Francisco property crime rate per 100,000 people- 4,741.6
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Old 05-20-2014, 01:47 PM
 
Location: Upper West Side, Manhattan, NYC
14,304 posts, read 17,964,136 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SFNative87 View Post
And the talk about Chicago being so crime ridden is really blown out of proportion! Yes, Chicago has a higher homicide rate, but its no worse than other Bay Area cities. Oakland, Richmond, Stockton- all have higher homicide rates than Chicago. Overall violent crime rates aren't available for Chicago but property crime rates are.

Chicago property crime rate per 100,000 people- 4,152.5
San Francisco property crime rate per 100,000 people- 4,741.6
Agreed, and there's a lot of perfectly fine and safe neighborhoods in Chicago. 75-80% of homicides also happen where only 30-35% of the overall population lives. The north side's homicide rate on average is about that of Seattle's or Austin's for over 1 million people. Also, the homicide rate for Chicago right now is also half of what it was in the early 90s/late 80s. The reason why violent crime isn't available for Chicago for the FBI level has to do with some discrepancies with reporting. Pretty much every city reports only the worst crime committed if multiple happened. That is if someone gets assaulted and dies from it, then it gets reported only as a homicide. In Chicago, I believe it gets counted as both an assault and homicide so you can't really compare. It's either that or specifically to do with sexual assaults. I forget which

An Associate Professor of Sociology at Yale also did a study on violent crime in Chicago and concluded that last year it was the lowest it had been since the early 1970s. It also showed that almost all neighborhoods in the city were getting better, and except for a few - the ones that got worse were already very low crime areas that saw a very small increase (but because it was low to begin with, most any increase would result in a large percentage increase, mathematically):

http://images.politico.com/global/20...ngpaper023.pdf

You can also see every crime every reported since 2001 here:
https://data.cityofchicago.org/Publi...sent/ijzp-q8t2
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Old 05-21-2014, 01:50 PM
 
5,636 posts, read 13,326,745 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SFNative87 View Post
Or you could simply head 10 miles North, South, or East of San Francisco and get the pool weather. Honestly, weather is important, and Chicago winters are terrible. It absolutely is a big deal when you have to wear 4 layers of clothing just to keep warm outside. Although SF's weather does bore me, there is plenty of warm weather in the Bay Area only a 20 minute car ride outside of SF.
Th problem is that when people move to SF, they generally want to be in the urban center of the city as that is their main purpose of moving (or at least one of them). San Mateo County is for families. Marin County is all old rich people in small town. East Bay is mostly ghetto or working class. Parts of Oakland and Berkeley are the only places anyone would want to live in there. And San Jose? Omfg that is the most boring big city that has ever existed IMO. Santana Row is just about the only thing to do there. I do agree the weather is better in other parts of the Bay Area though. East Bay has great weather. But for people who want good weather right in the city of San Francisco, the Mission District and Potrero Hill are the best neighborhoods. SoMa isn't so bad either but is just so windy because of all the highrises creating wind tunnels.

And as for pool weather, I'm assuming some of the newer buildings in downtown Chicago have pools right? None in SF that I know of do. You need to be in the suburbs to have a pool, but it sounds like the OP wants city living.
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Old 05-21-2014, 03:16 PM
 
1,462 posts, read 1,508,366 times
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There are plenty of out door pools in and around downtown SF - for example - my parent's building has a pool, my building has a pool and my friends building has a pool.

Even on the colder / windier / foggy / more overcast western side of the city where I grew up there was a pool 5 houses down from me in Forest Hill & there are some pools in St. Francis Wood. Sea Cliff..
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