U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S. > City vs. City
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 05-22-2014, 10:21 PM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
15,720 posts, read 18,320,317 times
Reputation: 11250

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by PurpleHaze1100 View Post
Eating blue crabs has always been a Baltimore exclusive.
Captain White's Seafood City?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 05-23-2014, 02:56 PM
 
Location: Tokyo, Japan
6,488 posts, read 7,769,500 times
Reputation: 7311
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigCityDreamer View Post
But where does a large percentage of the population in the Baltimore MSA work - especially the higher income earners? Where does much of this wealth actually come from? That is the bottom line and I don't have very good stats on that. All you have to do is look at where the wealth is concentrated in Maryland and it is obviously to the southwest of Baltimore.

I know quite a lot of people who have relocated from Montgomery County to Howard County but still kept their jobs in the DC area. I know a few people who live in Baltimore and work in DC, Nova, etc.
Not denying that. Washington is a true power-keg when it comes to affluence and wealth creation, particularly for the upper middle income bracket.

Notes: My own screenshot of the Brookings article.

However, think about it like this. Which of the two cities dominates Maryland more? The one actually in Maryland and surrounded by Maryland on all of it's sides or the one not in Maryland and only surrounded by it on one of it's two major sides? Washington has a huge hand in Maryland, of course, nearly equal to that of Baltimore, due to it's big suburbs there but I have to say Baltimore would hold the edge here, no?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-23-2014, 03:21 PM
 
Location: ITL (Houston)
9,223 posts, read 13,488,109 times
Reputation: 3545
Quote:
Originally Posted by the resident09 View Post
I dated a girl from West Bmore who's dad was a die hard Redskins fan, so the whole where fans live point is moot. At one point the Redskins were the only team South of Pittsburgh and Philly all the way to Atlanta.
Don't forget that the Baltimore Colts existed.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-23-2014, 06:15 PM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
15,720 posts, read 18,320,317 times
Reputation: 11250
Quote:
Originally Posted by Red John View Post
However, think about it like this. Which of the two cities dominates Maryland more? The one actually in Maryland and surrounded by Maryland on all of it's sides or the one not in Maryland and only surrounded by it on one of it's two major sides? Washington has a huge hand in Maryland, of course, nearly equal to that of Baltimore, due to it's big suburbs there but I have to say Baltimore would hold the edge here, no?
The thing is that even though Washington, D.C is not a part of Maryland, it still feels like it could be in Maryland.

Actually, Nova feels like it could be in Maryland too in my opinion - It is a lot more similar and connected to the Maryland suburbs of D.C. than it is to anywhere else in Virginia. There's a continuity to the whole metro area. It is probably impossible to separate it out in terms of labor markets, sports followings and things like that.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-23-2014, 06:18 PM
 
Location: Baltimore
673 posts, read 825,993 times
Reputation: 274
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigCityDreamer View Post
The thing is that even though Washington, D.C is not a part of Maryland, it still feels like it could be in Maryland.

Actually, Nova feels like it could be in Maryland too in my opinion - It is a lot more similar and connected to the Maryland suburbs of D.C. than it is to anywhere else in Virginia. There is a continuity to the whole region.
No it doesn't. Nova is so much more developed and urbanized than the suburbs of MD. It even has a skyline when looking at it across the Potomac from DC. Not to mention its highway system is far more developed than MD's. DC to me does not feel like its apart of MD. Only EOTR does. Your comparison doesn't make sense.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-23-2014, 07:29 PM
 
Location: Philly
22 posts, read 22,111 times
Reputation: 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigCityDreamer View Post
The thing is that even though Washington, D.C is not a part of Maryland, it still feels like it could be in Maryland.

Actually, Nova feels like it could be in Maryland too in my opinion - It is a lot more similar and connected to the Maryland suburbs of D.C. than it is to anywhere else in Virginia. There's a continuity to the whole metro area. It is probably impossible to separate it out in terms of labor markets, sports followings and things like that.

NoVa doesn't feel like Maryland at all.
The Maryland suburbs tend to be older as well overall.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-23-2014, 08:13 PM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
15,720 posts, read 18,320,317 times
Reputation: 11250
Quote:
Originally Posted by RichieTrick View Post
NoVa doesn't feel like Maryland at all.
The Maryland suburbs tend to be older as well overall.
Nova has overall newer development, and that is the result of the burst of growth that happened over the last 25 or so years.

However, the most affluent zip codes in the Washington, D.C. region cover a continuous stretch beginning around Haymarket to Stone Ridge, Ashburn, Great Falls, Vienna and McLean in Virginia to Northwest D.C. to Bethesda, Potomac, Rockville, Olney, Brookeville, Clarksville and ending at Ellicott City in Maryland.

This stretch is what I'm describing as being very similar. It is the wealth connected with Washington, D.C. mostly.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-23-2014, 10:31 PM
 
Location: BMORE!
7,263 posts, read 5,586,889 times
Reputation: 3271
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigCityDreamer View Post
Nova has overall newer development, and that is the result of the burst of growth that happened over the last 25 or so years.

However, the most affluent zip codes in the Washington, D.C. region cover a continuous stretch beginning around Haymarket to Stone Ridge, Ashburn, Great Falls, Vienna and McLean in Virginia to Northwest D.C. to Bethesda, Potomac, Rockville, Olney, Brookeville, Clarksville and ending at Ellicott City in Maryland.

This stretch is what I'm describing as being very similar. It is the wealth connected with Washington, D.C. mostly.
Ellicott City and Brookville aren't in the DC region.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-24-2014, 04:11 PM
 
Location: Tokyo, Japan
6,488 posts, read 7,769,500 times
Reputation: 7311
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigCityDreamer View Post
The thing is that even though Washington, D.C is not a part of Maryland, it still feels like it could be in Maryland.

Actually, Nova feels like it could be in Maryland too in my opinion - It is a lot more similar and connected to the Maryland suburbs of D.C. than it is to anywhere else in Virginia. There's a continuity to the whole metro area. It is probably impossible to separate it out in terms of labor markets, sports followings and things like that.
Yeah, Alexandria (where my house is) was originally apart of the District of Columbia, as was Arlington County in Northern Virginia too. From an outsiders perspective, I see little to no difference between Alexandria and Arlington with Washington culturally speaking, they are practically the same thing.

As for Northern Virginia. I mean honestly, it's just the Washington metropolitan area's version of Orange County, California / Northern New Jersey / Fort Bend County, Texas / DuPage County, Illinois / Collin County, Texas / Broward County, Florida / San Mateo and Contra Costa Counties, California and such and such. It's a highly transient bedroom community with impeccable diversity, multitude of office space and edge cities, and vast suburban shopping and dining options, similar in the demographical and physical function to the places I listed above.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-24-2014, 04:26 PM
 
Location: Prince George's County, Maryland
6,212 posts, read 7,069,961 times
Reputation: 2581
Quote:
Originally Posted by RichieTrick View Post
NoVa doesn't feel like Maryland at all.
The Maryland suburbs tend to be older as well overall.
Agreed. Outside of Alexandria, most of NoVa feels pretty new. The Maryland suburbs definitely feel older and with a lot more character, especially the old streetcar suburbs and the Inner-Beltway communities. Downtown Silver Spring looks well-weathered and even Wheaton looks fairly gritty, similar to Colmar Manor and Mount Rainier. There's also a larger concentration of old money blue bloods here on the Maryland side of the DMV as well.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S. > City vs. City
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top