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Old 05-20-2014, 09:04 PM
 
Location: Upper West Side, Manhattan, NYC
14,304 posts, read 17,928,730 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by edwardsyzzurphands View Post
It was okay. But being the only game in town its what we had. They did seem to always be busy
Sounds like the one here. Though there is actually an Indonesian caterer downtown here, and I believe there is also an Indonesian Cultural Center just west of downtown.

Quote:
I heard one of the cooks resurfaced at this Malaysian restaurant in Cambridge and is cooking a few Indonesian dishes on the menu.
It's always good when this happens - I hate lease disputes and what not. There's a place around the corner from where I live. Awesome, vibrant street patio in an area with others that gave the street a cool vibe - kind of a wine bar type of deal and next door was a cafe/upscale grocery owned by the same woman. Lease dispute - gone. Sucks...


Quote:
I don't remember any chicken rice balls, how are they prepared? Here is the menu, if you are ever in London, its worth a visit. Sedap
I think it's pretty easy - chicken cooks for hours and they basically put rice on the outside compacted so it looks like a rice ball. Then you dip it in some chili sauce. Most famous places is on Jonker Street in Malacca. This is what it looks like:

https://scontent-a-lga.xx.fbcdn.net/...14033948_n.jpg

Reminds me too of the first dinner I had in Port Klang, about 25 miles SW of Kuala Lumpur. 3 whole crabs, 4 coconuts, buns, and two big Malay-Chinese dishes. ---> $15 USD

https://fbcdn-sphotos-c-a.akamaihd.n...19957873_n.jpg


Quote:
London is the only place I have eaten this type of food, so you are right when you say it is not common.
As far as I know, NYC has a decent number of Malaysian places but after that every other major metro area as far as I know only has a small handful each.

Thanks for the recommendation in London. I'll check it out next time I'm there!

Quote:
Thats the thing, finding the right balance is the key, and its just not quite right when I do it. I heard it did vary from country to country, which version did you enjoy the most?
I liked the Malaysian version of the best. My first taste of it was in the US in a suburb of Chicago and it was actually pretty good compared to what I had in Malaysia. Have you heard of their dish ABC? It's a dessert like cendol too, but called ABC because they put tons of stuff in it.

https://scontent-b-lga.xx.fbcdn.net/...22126804_n.jpg


Most hilarious thing there food-wise was that I was at a mall in KL or Petaling Jaya (mall culture is big there) and went into this donut shop. Took a picture of a donut and got yelled at. They don't allow pictures. LOL! Awesome street food right here too:
https://fbcdn-sphotos-a-a.akamaihd.n...46162733_n.jpg
https://fbcdn-sphotos-g-a.akamaihd.n...78772860_n.jpg
https://scontent-b-lga.xx.fbcdn.net/...51089238_n.jpg

If you watch Anthony Bourdain, he actually has a big love for Malaysian food and the first trip there is apparently the one that made him fall in love with SE Asia. If you ever find a Nasi Kandar place too...GET IT. Amazing stuff.
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Old 05-20-2014, 09:18 PM
 
Location: West of Louisiana, East of New Mexico
2,494 posts, read 1,853,849 times
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What's interesting is that the so-called top food cities don't seem to have much of a "native" cuisine. Most of their reputation comes from having tons of immigrants that create a demand for authentic mother country food. The locals benefit and think it makes their city better.

Personally, I appreciate the tradition of a city like New Orleans more than NYC, LA etc. NOLA's food (while having distant Acadian, French and African roots) is truly...of that city. Instead of a bunch of separate and distinct cultures, it's a blend that more accurately reflects the melting pot that is the U.S.A.
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Old 05-20-2014, 09:20 PM
 
Location: Upper West Side, Manhattan, NYC
14,304 posts, read 17,928,730 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jgn2013 View Post
What's interesting is that the so-called top food cities don't seem to have much of a "native" cuisine. Most of their reputation comes from having tons of immigrants that create a demand for authentic mother country food. The locals benefit and think it makes their city better.

Personally, I appreciate the tradition of a city like New Orleans more than NYC, LA etc. NOLA's food (while having distant Acadian, French and African roots) is truly...of that city. Instead of a bunch of separate and distinct cultures, it's a blend that more accurately reflects the melting pot that is the U.S.A.
I would say that Chicago has its own cuisine that it's known for. I think NOLA has the best American regional cuisine, but that's just my personal preference. A true food city though is about everything, not just what their own "inventions" are.
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Old 05-20-2014, 10:02 PM
 
1,317 posts, read 1,677,139 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jgn2013 View Post
What's interesting is that the so-called top food cities don't seem to have much of a "native" cuisine. Most of their reputation comes from having tons of immigrants that create a demand for authentic mother country food. The locals benefit and think it makes their city better.

Personally, I appreciate the tradition of a city like New Orleans more than NYC, LA etc. NOLA's food (while having distant Acadian, French and African roots) is truly...of that city. Instead of a bunch of separate and distinct cultures, it's a blend that more accurately reflects the melting pot that is the U.S.A.
California cuisine and New American cuisine is strong here in LA. I would call that the native cuisine here. Fusion cuisine is strong here too.
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Old 05-21-2014, 12:39 AM
 
Location: LBC
4,155 posts, read 4,296,985 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jgn2013 View Post
What's interesting is that the so-called top food cities don't seem to have much of a "native" cuisine. Most of their reputation comes from having tons of immigrants that create a demand for authentic mother country food. The locals benefit and think it makes their city better.

Personally, I appreciate the tradition of a city like New Orleans more than NYC, LA etc. NOLA's food (while having distant Acadian, French and African roots) is truly...of that city. Instead of a bunch of separate and distinct cultures, it's a blend that more accurately reflects the melting pot that is the U.S.A.
Mexican food as we know it is largely "native" to Alta California.
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Old 05-21-2014, 08:29 AM
 
9,972 posts, read 14,024,392 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nslander View Post
Mexican food as we know it is largely "native" to Alta California.
Based on what though---mission burritos and fish tacos? Maybe that's true for someone eating at Chipotle regularly. Maybe a lot of the really cliched American-Mex styles are often Tex-Mex, but what else really evolved in California(or the other SW states of what was Alta California).

Pozole, tortas, tacos al pastor, mole negro, carnitas, chiles en nogada, tamales and so on...none of these really evolved much north of the border, and they aren't hard to find in this day in age with the massive numbers of Mexican immigrants basically everywhere in the Western US(though a good mole is rarer).




(Of course very few foods are really solely "native" to one region or the rest. People move and bring new ingredients and styles all the time. The "fusion" food of one time is the "authentic" food of another.)

Last edited by Deezus; 05-21-2014 at 08:55 AM..
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Old 05-21-2014, 09:06 AM
 
370 posts, read 718,288 times
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I know chicago is famous for a few dishes (pizza, italian beef,etc) but what is Chicago cuisine?

I lived there but never heard of Chicago cuisine..

Quote:
Originally Posted by marothisu View Post
I would say that Chicago has its own cuisine that it's known for. I think NOLA has the best American regional cuisine, but that's just my personal preference. A true food city though is about everything, not just what their own "inventions" are.
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Old 05-21-2014, 10:36 AM
 
Location: LBC
4,155 posts, read 4,296,985 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Deezus View Post
Based on what though---mission burritos and fish tacos? Maybe that's true for someone eating at Chipotle regularly. Maybe a lot of the really cliched American-Mex styles are often Tex-Mex, but what else really evolved in California(or the other SW states of what was Alta California).

Pozole, tortas, tacos al pastor, mole negro, carnitas, chiles en nogada, tamales and so on...none of these really evolved much north of the border, and they aren't hard to find in this day in age with the massive numbers of Mexican immigrants basically everywhere in the Western US(though a good mole is rarer).




(Of course very few foods are really solely "native" to one region or the rest. People move and bring new ingredients and styles all the time. The "fusion" food of one time is the "authentic" food of another.)
The massive numbers Mexican immigrants you identified have had some presence here for centuries. You don't think they contributed to that evolution?
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Old 05-21-2014, 12:18 PM
 
Location: Tokyo, Japan
6,479 posts, read 7,714,517 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marothisu View Post
Singapore was an interesting place. It was cool and I liked it, but I liked Kuala Lumpur more. Singapore seemed too sterile in too many places to be honest. Malaysia does offer variety though it's not going to be like in American cities. While I was there and being taken around, I spotted Japanese, Chinese, Indian, Italian, Portuguese, Greek, and American food. There's actually a number of places that serve good burgers there including the famous Ramly Burger. McDonald's is actually EXTREMELY popular there and more than just for the unique items on the menu. My ex told me that teenagers actually hang out at McDonald's for hours even playing board games there. She was always wanting it after a night of drinking too. I know there's more, but regardless if you are someone who loves food, then Malaysian food is a must.
I'm going to have to ask for clarification, under what grounds are you asserting that Kuala Lumpur and Malaysia have better food than Singapore and Thailand?

Last edited by Facts Kill Rhetoric; 05-21-2014 at 12:33 PM..
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Old 05-21-2014, 01:06 PM
 
Location: Huntington Beach, CA
5,793 posts, read 10,627,597 times
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NY, LA, SF and DC (and their burbs) have the most variety...

Chicago, Seattle, Philadelphia and Miami are up there...

Almost every other city is mostly regional fare, with the occasional ethnic embellisment.
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