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View Poll Results: Where Should we Concentrate our Memorial Day Weekend 2015 Vacation Efforts?
Stay in/near Savannah, GA 32 35.16%
Stay in/near Charleston, SC 38 41.76%
Stay in/near Walterboro, SC and Visit BOTH Cities 21 23.08%
Voters: 91. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 06-03-2014, 12:10 AM
 
Location: Savannah GA
13,124 posts, read 15,928,232 times
Reputation: 9150

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Quote:
Originally Posted by afonega1 View Post
Last time I was in Savannah I was riding bikes with friends and "discovered" the Victorian District.

As many times as I had been to Savannah ,I never really explored that part of the city nor knew of hits history.
I love how in Savannah you can actually see the changes throughout the decades of each era the more North you go.

Does Charleston have a similar area?Does it change like it does in Savaanah by era in design of the houses and neighborhods?
Actually, it's the more SOUTH you go ... but yes, that's one of the really fascinating things about Savannah. The city is laid out in a grid that starts at the river and continues south for miles. If you take Abercorn south from downtown to I-95, you see 290 years of Savannah history on display, like the rings of a tree (well, half a tree anyway).

Every few blocks, you pass into another decade. At the time of the Civil War, the city limits were pretty much defined by today's Historic District (the city ended around Forsyth Park). Then came the Victorian District in the late 1800s. By 1900, present-day Victory Drive was the southern boundary of the city. The neighborhoods beyond there (Ardsley Park, etc) were laid out in the 1910s-1920s, then the blocks beyond that in the 1930s-40s, then the blocks beyond that in the 1950s-60s.

As recently as the 1950s, the southern boundary of the city was DeRenne Avenue -- which is an amazing fact for anybody who knows Savannah. It's a huge traffic nightmare today, home to both of the city's main hospital systems, and represents the de facto line between historic "old" Savannah and "new" Savannah, Midtown and Southside. I know plenty of old timers who remember when everything beyond DeRenne Avenue was dirt. Development of that part of the city didn't began until the late 1960s, didn't take off until the 1970s, and the architecture shows it.

When Armstrong State moved to its present location in 1966, it was literally in the "middle of nowhere." Abercorn Street dead-ended at the Forrest River, before they built a bridge. The Windsor Forest neighborhood behind Armstrong State was THE place to live in the 1960s ... it was high-class, because it was new and remote and safe. Now it's rundown and has lots of section 8 housing.

Oglethorpe Mall opened in 1969. The car dealers all moved out of downtown and went south in the 1970s. Fast forward to 1990, when Savannah Mall opened on the banks of the Forrest River -- which by then had a bridge connecting Ga 204 to the interstate. Everybody thought that would be it. But growth skipped over that and continued on to Georgetown, and then out to Richmond Hill and up Ogeechee Road. Traffic got worse. Now it's spread across I-95 and is starting to fill west Chatham out I-16.

As truly beautiful and fascinating as historic downtown Savannah is, I often encourage tourists to take the drive out through the south side of town to see what the rest of the city looks like. Seriously, you'd be amazed at how many visitors to Savannah think that the whole city is just like it is downtown, or that there's nothing more beyond that except slums -- when in fact, it's got shopping malls, fast-food places and tract housing like in any other city.

Also, some of the most beautiful and charming parts of Savannah are the parts that developed in the first half of the 20th century, between Victory Drive and DeRenne Avenue. This is actually the most desirable area of town for locals. For example, tonight I had dinner with a friend in Habersham Village and I wondered how many people even know this part of Savannah exists? It's fantastic neighborhood -- like Virginia Highlands.

HABERSHAM VILLAGE:

https://www.google.com/maps/@32.0373...sgAUsi60xw!2e0

https://www.google.com/maps/@32.0348...KwzsbiPvsg!2e0

ARDSLEY PARK:

https://www.google.com/maps/@32.0499...5MY0fTkVnw!2e0

https://www.google.com/maps/@32.0489...w04IbMWpAw!2e0

DAFFIN PARK:

https://www.google.com/maps/@32.0478...seP-mRSJNQ!2e0

https://www.google.com/maps/@32.0444...az2RLx560Q!2e0

DERENNE AVENUE AND ABERCORN STREET (where Southside Savannah begins)

https://www.google.com/maps/@32.0285...7YTrBA_wnA!2e0

SOUTHSIDE SAVANNAH:

https://www.google.com/maps/@32.0055...xBE24F2MFQ!2e0

FAR SOUTHSIDE SAVANNAH:

https://www.google.com/maps/@31.9813...2IOXzZoEIA!2e0

Last edited by Newsboy; 06-03-2014 at 12:54 AM..
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Old 06-03-2014, 05:41 AM
 
Location: Atlanta
1,541 posts, read 1,788,214 times
Reputation: 1572
Quote:
Originally Posted by Newsboy View Post
Actually, it's the more SOUTH you go ... but yes, that's one of the really fascinating things about Savannah. The city is laid out in a grid that starts at the river and continues south for miles. If you take Abercorn south from downtown to I-95, you see 290 years of Savannah history on display, like the rings of a tree (well, half a tree anyway).

Every few blocks, you pass into another decade. At the time of the Civil War, the city limits were pretty much defined by today's Historic District (the city ended around Forsyth Park). Then came the Victorian District in the late 1800s. By 1900, present-day Victory Drive was the southern boundary of the city. The neighborhoods beyond there (Ardsley Park, etc) were laid out in the 1910s-1920s, then the blocks beyond that in the 1930s-40s, then the blocks beyond that in the 1950s-60s.

As recently as the 1950s, the southern boundary of the city was DeRenne Avenue -- which is an amazing fact for anybody who knows Savannah. It's a huge traffic nightmare today, home to both of the city's main hospital systems, and represents the de facto line between historic "old" Savannah and "new" Savannah, Midtown and Southside. I know plenty of old timers who remember when everything beyond DeRenne Avenue was dirt. Development of that part of the city didn't began until the late 1960s, didn't take off until the 1970s, and the architecture shows it.

When Armstrong State moved to its present location in 1966, it was literally in the "middle of nowhere." Abercorn Street dead-ended at the Forrest River, before they built a bridge. The Windsor Forest neighborhood behind Armstrong State was THE place to live in the 1960s ... it was high-class, because it was new and remote and safe. Now it's rundown and has lots of section 8 housing.

Oglethorpe Mall opened in 1969. The car dealers all moved out of downtown and went south in the 1970s. Fast forward to 1990, when Savannah Mall opened on the banks of the Forrest River -- which by then had a bridge connecting Ga 204 to the interstate. Everybody thought that would be it. But growth skipped over that and continued on to Georgetown, and then out to Richmond Hill and up Ogeechee Road. Traffic got worse. Now it's spread across I-95 and is starting to fill west Chatham out I-16.

As truly beautiful and fascinating as historic downtown Savannah is, I often encourage tourists to take the drive out through the south side of town to see what the rest of the city looks like. Seriously, you'd be amazed at how many visitors to Savannah think that the whole city is just like it is downtown, or that there's nothing more beyond that except slums -- when in fact, it's got shopping malls, fast-food places and tract housing like in any other city.

Also, some of the most beautiful and charming parts of Savannah are the parts that developed in the first half of the 20th century, between Victory Drive and DeRenne Avenue. This is actually the most desirable area of town for locals. For example, tonight I had dinner with a friend in Habersham Village and I wondered how many people even know this part of Savannah exists? It's fantastic neighborhood -- like Virginia Highlands.

HABERSHAM VILLAGE:

https://www.google.com/maps/@32.0373...sgAUsi60xw!2e0

https://www.google.com/maps/@32.0348...KwzsbiPvsg!2e0

ARDSLEY PARK:

https://www.google.com/maps/@32.0499...5MY0fTkVnw!2e0

https://www.google.com/maps/@32.0489...w04IbMWpAw!2e0

DAFFIN PARK:

https://www.google.com/maps/@32.0478...seP-mRSJNQ!2e0

https://www.google.com/maps/@32.0444...az2RLx560Q!2e0

DERENNE AVENUE AND ABERCORN STREET (where Southside Savannah begins)

https://www.google.com/maps/@32.0285...7YTrBA_wnA!2e0

SOUTHSIDE SAVANNAH:

https://www.google.com/maps/@32.0055...xBE24F2MFQ!2e0

FAR SOUTHSIDE SAVANNAH:

https://www.google.com/maps/@31.9813...2IOXzZoEIA!2e0
Amazing post. Thanks.. My Grandfather was the oldest practicing lawyer in Savannah in the late 70's. I am sure you have heard of him, his last name was Petit.


This park is amazing, is that actually Ardsley "Park"?
https://www.google.com/maps/@32.0489...w04IbMWpAw!2e0

Last edited by bigstick; 06-03-2014 at 06:25 AM..
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Old 06-03-2014, 07:47 AM
 
Location: Outer Boroughs, NYC
1,543 posts, read 1,170,086 times
Reputation: 931
NB, Agree with all but: "The Windsor Forest neighborhood behind Armstrong State was THE place to live in the 1960s ... it was high-class, because it was new and remote and safe."

Not at all. At that time, Windsor was middle-class suburban, with some blue-collar families and most of Savannah's non-Southern transplants (families as well as singles in the 3 or 4 apt. complexes). Many parents of my friends who lived downtown, midtown, DeRenne and eastside thought WF was oddly weird and to be avoided. For years, the new Windsor Forest High was considered the hippie-drugs-'hood school in town (patently ridiculous, of course, but my middle-school teachers railed against it -- my Latin teacher asked for a show of hands for our high-school assignments and lamented "you poor students who will attend Windsor"). That was widely believed at the time. Savannah was a very insular, conservative, backwater southern town in the 1960s, and downtown/midtown/eastside dominated. Most of us couldn't wait to leave town after graduation (and 80% of my high school class did leave Savannah, permanently.) The southside was seen by many Savannahians as weird and highly suspect. WF was simply not considered "high class" or anything near that; it was foreign, almost exotic, "out there" and far less desirable than Ardsley Park, Kensington Park, and older neighborhoods. I remember it well.
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Old 06-03-2014, 09:22 AM
 
Location: Savannah GA
13,124 posts, read 15,928,232 times
Reputation: 9150
Well, Windsor Forest had a golf and country club, and it's still home to Savannah Country Day School, the most exclusive and expensive private school in the city, so I stand by what I said.

It was also far removed from the "undesirable" elements downtown that so many native Savannahians fled from *en masse* during the 1960s. I know many natives of my era who grew up in WF. It was 100% lily white out there, and "safe." Not so much anymore.
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Old 06-03-2014, 09:55 AM
 
Location: Atlanta ,GA
9,086 posts, read 12,866,730 times
Reputation: 2908
Quote:
Originally Posted by Newsboy View Post
Actually, it's the more SOUTH you go ... but yes, that's one of the really fascinating things about Savannah. The city is laid out in a grid that starts at the river and continues south for miles. If you take Abercorn south from downtown to I-95, you see 290 years of Savannah history on display, like the rings of a tree (well, half a tree anyway).

Every few blocks, you pass into another decade. At the time of the Civil War, the city limits were pretty much defined by today's Historic District (the city ended around Forsyth Park). Then came the Victorian District in the late 1800s. By 1900, present-day Victory Drive was the southern boundary of the city. The neighborhoods beyond there (Ardsley Park, etc) were laid out in the 1910s-1920s, then the blocks beyond that in the 1930s-40s, then the blocks beyond that in the 1950s-60s.

As recently as the 1950s, the southern boundary of the city was DeRenne Avenue -- which is an amazing fact for anybody who knows Savannah. It's a huge traffic nightmare today, home to both of the city's main hospital systems, and represents the de facto line between historic "old" Savannah and "new" Savannah, Midtown and Southside. I know plenty of old timers who remember when everything beyond DeRenne Avenue was dirt. Development of that part of the city didn't began until the late 1960s, didn't take off until the 1970s, and the architecture shows it.

When Armstrong State moved to its present location in 1966, it was literally in the "middle of nowhere." Abercorn Street dead-ended at the Forrest River, before they built a bridge. The Windsor Forest neighborhood behind Armstrong State was THE place to live in the 1960s ... it was high-class, because it was new and remote and safe. Now it's rundown and has lots of section 8 housing.

Oglethorpe Mall opened in 1969. The car dealers all moved out of downtown and went south in the 1970s. Fast forward to 1990, when Savannah Mall opened on the banks of the Forrest River -- which by then had a bridge connecting Ga 204 to the interstate. Everybody thought that would be it. But growth skipped over that and continued on to Georgetown, and then out to Richmond Hill and up Ogeechee Road. Traffic got worse. Now it's spread across I-95 and is starting to fill west Chatham out I-16.

As truly beautiful and fascinating as historic downtown Savannah is, I often encourage tourists to take the drive out through the south side of town to see what the rest of the city looks like. Seriously, you'd be amazed at how many visitors to Savannah think that the whole city is just like it is downtown, or that there's nothing more beyond that except slums -- when in fact, it's got shopping malls, fast-food places and tract housing like in any other city.

Also, some of the most beautiful and charming parts of Savannah are the parts that developed in the first half of the 20th century, between Victory Drive and DeRenne Avenue. This is actually the most desirable area of town for locals. For example, tonight I had dinner with a friend in Habersham Village and I wondered how many people even know this part of Savannah exists? It's fantastic neighborhood -- like Virginia Highlands.

HABERSHAM VILLAGE:

https://www.google.com/maps/@32.0373...sgAUsi60xw!2e0

https://www.google.com/maps/@32.0348...KwzsbiPvsg!2e0

ARDSLEY PARK:

https://www.google.com/maps/@32.0499...5MY0fTkVnw!2e0

https://www.google.com/maps/@32.0489...w04IbMWpAw!2e0

DAFFIN PARK:

https://www.google.com/maps/@32.0478...seP-mRSJNQ!2e0

https://www.google.com/maps/@32.0444...az2RLx560Q!2e0

DERENNE AVENUE AND ABERCORN STREET (where Southside Savannah begins)

https://www.google.com/maps/@32.0285...7YTrBA_wnA!2e0

SOUTHSIDE SAVANNAH:

https://www.google.com/maps/@32.0055...xBE24F2MFQ!2e0

FAR SOUTHSIDE SAVANNAH:

https://www.google.com/maps/@31.9813...2IOXzZoEIA!2e0
Wjen I typed North had a feeling that was wrong.lol.I always get turned around in Savannah.
I have familly that lives in the worst part of Savannah.My great aunt and uncle live near the railrod tracks for over 50 years.Not a good area.

Then I have other relatives that are younger that live all over in some of the nicest areas as far as even Richmond Hill.
I know a little abiut the cityand trying to learn more.Im tracing my family ties in the area and it has been difficult as it is for many black families in the South due to limitations of slavery and racism in the past as far as record keeping.

Its so much history in Savannah that like you said gies beyond the historic center.I do love Ardsley Park.Its one of my favorites!

What is the neighborhood where you start seeing more nice mid century modern houses from the late 60's and 70's?I love those "Brady Bunch" type houses.?
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Old 06-03-2014, 11:37 AM
 
Location: Outer Boroughs, NYC
1,543 posts, read 1,170,086 times
Reputation: 931
@NB. Nope, there was NOTHING "high-class" about Windsor Forest. Few southside kids attended Country Day. SCDS was a very small school in the 1960s, with only 30 or 40 kids per class in the upper grades, and just about all of its students were nouveau-riche kids who lived further in town. The La Vida Country Club was sited in WF because land was so affordable then. Most members didn't live in the area.

I'm not saying that Windsor Forest wasn't nicer then; it was, and safe, brand-spanking new, with well-tended yards (every block). There was a good weekly community newspaper. But WF was "way out there" for most Savannahians, and it was not considered all that desirable by the city's movers and shakers, who lived elsewhere. It had a few affluent nooks and crannies of larger homes, but it was solidly middle-class. "Higher-class" was Mayfair, Habersham Woods, parts of Kensington, and of course Ardsley Park. "Middle-class" was Windsor and Wilshire, if your parents were adventurous and wanted to live at the end of the line on Abercorn. Lower-middle class/blue collar was Paradise Park, Chippewa Terrace, and Oakhurst. All of these were lily-white neighborhoods in the 1960s, and were all modest, not at all ritzy.

Last edited by masonbauknight; 06-03-2014 at 11:51 AM..
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Old 06-03-2014, 12:33 PM
 
Location: Savannah GA
13,124 posts, read 15,928,232 times
Reputation: 9150
Quote:
Originally Posted by afonega1 View Post
Wjen I typed North had a feeling that was wrong.lol.I always get turned around in Savannah.
It's a common mistake. I'm often stopped by tourists turning maps over and over in their hands, asking which direction the river is, even when they're only a couple of blocks away from it. A dense grid city will do that to you. When I first moved to Savannah years ago from Atlanta, I got lost all the time because I wasn't used to a city laid out on a grid. Every block looked exactly alike, and still does to some degree. That's why I have no problem getting around Atlanta; the roads and landscaping are markers to me.

Quote:
Originally Posted by afonega1 View Post
I have familly that lives in the worst part of Savannah.My great aunt and uncle live near the railrod tracks for over 50 years.Not a good area.
Savannah, like all cities, has some bad areas, no doubt. But it's not as bad as many people make them out to be. For one thing, the line between the pristine Historic District and some of the worst parts of town is very small. You can literally be on one nice block, and two blocks later be surrounded by bordered-up abandoned houses. This freaks a lot of people out and I think the sharp contrast makes them think "This is the most awful place I've ever seenl." But I've seen far worse ghettos in other cities, including Atlanta. There is nothing in Savannah that comes close to Bankhead, or East St. Louis, or Camden, or Detroit, or the Bronx.

Even Savannah's worst neighborhoods have good bones. Even the most "ghetto" parts of Savannah were once very dense, very nice, and in some cases, very historic neighborhoods. A prime example of this is Waters Avenue, which is where much of the violent crime is centered. I drove down it yesterday, and I wasn't afraid. It has issues, yes, but it wasn't scary to me. The city has been trying to clean up that corridor for years and there are glimmers of hope. There are so many neat old buildings and so much potential there. But it's far enough outside the desirable parts of town that gentrification will come slowly, if ever. Then there's the issue of what to do with people like your aunt and uncle, who've lived in these areas their whole lives. Where are they to go if rich white people come in and take over the whole town? There has to be a balance.

Quote:
Originally Posted by afonega1 View Post
Then I have other relatives that are younger that live all over in some of the nicest areas as far as even Richmond Hill.
Richmond Hill is VERY nice, with great schools. Totally suburban and growing like crazy. Not cheap, either.

Quote:
Originally Posted by afonega1 View Post
I know a little abiut the cityand trying to learn more.Im tracing my family ties in the area and it has been difficult as it is for many black families in the South due to limitations of slavery and racism in the past as far as record keeping.
Have you tried the Georgia Historical Society at Hodgson Hall (on Forsyth Park)? Next time you're in town, stop by there and tell them what you're looking for. They've got records going back to the very beginning and probably can help you do African-American family research. You could also check with the Owens-Thomas House and the Telfair Museums. Earlier this year, they launched a project to document and trace slave families who came through Savannah. They've even published a book on the subject; I met the author and curator and she's very passionate and knowledgeable.

Quote:
Originally Posted by afonega1 View Post
Its so much history in Savannah that like you said gies beyond the historic center.I do love Ardsley Park.Its one of my favorites!
Yep, Ardsley Park is Savannah's answer to Druid Hills (without the hills, obviously) and a simply stunning neighborhood. Some of the tour companies have run tourists out there on occasion, but I think it's mostly frowned upon and thus many visitors don't know about it. Other great neighborhoods are Baldwin Park, Parkside, Chatham Crescent and Gordonston.

Quote:
Originally Posted by afonega1 View Post
What is the neighborhood where you start seeing more nice mid century modern houses from the late 60's and 70's? I love those "Brady Bunch" type houses.?
I'm gonna guess Habersham Woods? It's south of DeRenne Avenue (where Habersham Street crosses into the Southside). Here are some photos:

https://www.google.com/maps/@32.0227...9P9dY6ZHPw!2e0

https://www.google.com/maps/@32.0170...D1O5BwLXVQ!2e0

https://www.google.com/maps/@32.0180...Trw99YOWkA!2e0

https://www.google.com/maps/@32.0171...C2BLqPWoxw!2e0

https://www.google.com/maps/@32.0175...EbLo_EU2mA!2e0

FYI ... This is my favorite *modern* house in all of Savannah! It's on Abercorn Street and has a pool in the center of it!

https://www.google.com/maps/@32.0336...gQW4pJotyQ!2e0

https://www.google.com/maps/@32.0338.../data=!3m1!1e3

This is another favorite of mine on Gwinnett at Truman Parkway as you're entering Gordonston. It SCREAMS Southern California to me!

https://www.google.com/maps/@32.0602...NckV9KbhVA!2e0

Last edited by Newsboy; 06-03-2014 at 01:49 PM..
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Old 06-03-2014, 06:17 PM
 
Location: Atlanta ,GA
9,086 posts, read 12,866,730 times
Reputation: 2908
Quote:
Originally Posted by Newsboy View Post
It's a common mistake. I'm often stopped by tourists turning maps over and over in their hands, asking which direction the river is, even when they're only a couple of blocks away from it. A dense grid city will do that to you. When I first moved to Savannah years ago from Atlanta, I got lost all the time because I wasn't used to a city laid out on a grid. Every block looked exactly alike, and still does to some degree. That's why I have no problem getting around Atlanta; the roads and landscaping are markers to me.



Savannah, like all cities, has some bad areas, no doubt. But it's not as bad as many people make them out to be. For one thing, the line between the pristine Historic District and some of the worst parts of town is very small. You can literally be on one nice block, and two blocks later be surrounded by bordered-up abandoned houses. This freaks a lot of people out and I think the sharp contrast makes them think "This is the most awful place I've ever seenl." But I've seen far worse ghettos in other cities, including Atlanta. There is nothing in Savannah that comes close to Bankhead, or East St. Louis, or Camden, or Detroit, or the Bronx.

Even Savannah's worst neighborhoods have good bones. Even the most "ghetto" parts of Savannah were once very dense, very nice, and in some cases, very historic neighborhoods. A prime example of this is Waters Avenue, which is where much of the violent crime is centered. I drove down it yesterday, and I wasn't afraid. It has issues, yes, but it wasn't scary to me. The city has been trying to clean up that corridor for years and there are glimmers of hope. There are so many neat old buildings and so much potential there. But it's far enough outside the desirable parts of town that gentrification will come slowly, if ever. Then there's the issue of what to do with people like your aunt and uncle, who've lived in these areas their whole lives. Where are they to go if rich white people come in and take over the whole town? There has to be a balance.


Richmond Hill is VERY nice, with great schools. Totally suburban and growing like crazy. Not cheap, either.



Have you tried the Georgia Historical Society at Hodgson Hall (on Forsyth Park)? Next time you're in town, stop by there and tell them what you're looking for. They've got records going back to the very beginning and probably can help you do African-American family research. You could also check with the Owens-Thomas House and the Telfair Museums. Earlier this year, they launched a project to document and trace slave families who came through Savannah. They've even published a book on the subject; I met the author and curator and she's very passionate and knowledgeable.



Yep, Ardsley Park is Savannah's answer to Druid Hills (without the hills, obviously) and a simply stunning neighborhood. Some of the tour companies have run tourists out there on occasion, but I think it's mostly frowned upon and thus many visitors don't know about it. Other great neighborhoods are Baldwin Park, Parkside, Chatham Crescent and Gordonston.



I'm gonna guess Habersham Woods? It's south of DeRenne Avenue (where Habersham Street crosses into the Southside). Here are some photos:

https://www.google.com/maps/@32.0227...9P9dY6ZHPw!2e0

https://www.google.com/maps/@32.0170...D1O5BwLXVQ!2e0

https://www.google.com/maps/@32.0180...Trw99YOWkA!2e0

https://www.google.com/maps/@32.0171...C2BLqPWoxw!2e0

https://www.google.com/maps/@32.0175...EbLo_EU2mA!2e0

FYI ... This is my favorite *modern* house in all of Savannah! It's on Abercorn Street and has a pool in the center of it!

https://www.google.com/maps/@32.0336...gQW4pJotyQ!2e0

https://www.google.com/maps/@32.0338.../data=!3m1!1e3

This is another favorite of mine on Gwinnett at Truman Parkway as you're entering Gordonston. It SCREAMS Southern California to me!

https://www.google.com/maps/@32.0602...NckV9KbhVA!2e0
I have seen that white modern house and yes like it alot also.I love that are with its bug yards and the size and look of the houses.

As far as the bad areas of Savannah,I disagree.The bad areas in Savannah seem worse to me.(than in Atlanta),It could be that Im more famiiar with the hoods in Atlanta.
Bankhead is not that bad.In fact there are a lot of neighborhoods over there with wide streets and nice older homes.
True some are boarded up an run down but those in Savannah near where my Uncle and Aunt lives look like tiny match box houses on tiny lots.No style whatsoever.They almost look temporary.
The poverty seems more systemic and deeply entrenched.Its not particular to Savannah but more so in Southern smaller cities.
I love them to death but I would NEVER stay at their house.
Mainly because as older people,they are notbable clean that well.When it comes to bathrooms,Im a germaphobe.lol
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Old 07-15-2015, 11:41 AM
 
1 posts, read 949 times
Reputation: 10
Default You are not going back far enough, my dear and so your opionion is from a more recent era.

Quote:
Originally Posted by masonbauknight View Post
NB, Agree with all but: "The Windsor Forest neighborhood behind Armstrong State was THE place to live in the 1960s ... it was high-class, because it was new and remote and safe."

Not at all. At that time, Windsor was middle-class suburban, with some blue-collar families and most of Savannah's non-Southern transplants (families as well as singles in the 3 or 4 apt. complexes). Many parents of my friends who lived downtown, midtown, DeRenne and eastside thought WF was oddly weird and to be avoided. For years, the new Windsor Forest High was considered the hippie-drugs-'hood school in town (patently ridiculous, of course, but my middle-school teachers railed against it -- my Latin teacher asked for a show of hands for our high-school assignments and lamented "you poor students who will attend Windsor"). That was widely believed at the time. Savannah was a very insular, conservative, backwater southern town in the 1960s, and downtown/midtown/eastside dominated. Most of us couldn't wait to leave town after graduation (and 80% of my high school class did leave Savannah, permanently.) The southside was seen by many Savannahians as weird and highly suspect. WF was simply not considered "high class" or anything near that; it was foreign, almost exotic, "out there" and far less desirable than Ardsley Park, Kensington Park, and older neighborhoods. I remember it well.
I strongly object to your comment. For those of us in HS when Windsor Forest was developed, Windsor Forest was extremely nice. There were middle sized homes (3 BR 2 baths) to large (3,500 square feet with pools on large lots) and gracious sized homes. There were no "working class" homes at all. I did not live there but had many friends who did (seniors had the option of staying at Jenkins). I was jealous. The only kids who even smoked grass in 1967 to 70 were either a very few extremely wealthy kids with lots of money to spare (and I sure did not know them), or some surfer beach numb types. We were mostly clean cut. I did not know of even one person from the 1960s' in Jenkins who did not graduate from HS, nor did anyone get PG in HS. Maybe they were there, but I never heard of them and I had sisters 4 years older and 2 years younger. My Aunt taught at Windsor and transferred from Savannah HS BECAUSE of the quality of the school and because of the quality of the students. I am speaking of from about 1967 to 1975.

I never lived there, so I have no self interest in this. I know that today there is section 8 housing mixed in which has messed the area up, but to say that it was not nice for the first 10 years at least is just plain wrong. It was clean modern more expensive than the area I grew up in, the homes were larger and more well appointed and the kids who went to school out here considered themselves lucky. Yes, we natives have areas which we prefer, that is true, but Windsor was developed as a utopia and it was for a period and then section 8 housing finished some sections off, but there are still some nice sections near the water.

So your opinion has to be from at least a decade later if not more. And finally for any readers out there. Obama has a plan that he is pushing to place section 8 housing in all suburbs...Use Windsor as a lesson for you,.....NOT a good idea.
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Old 09-07-2016, 06:54 PM
 
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Originally Posted by SteelCityRising View Post
I suppose we're just not big drinkers, really, and would prefer better dining experiences. The thought of getting buzzed while walking around Savannah drinking a frozen margarita sounds divine, but I sober up quickly and would have no trouble driving an hour back to a hotel at the end of the day if it means spending half as much per night on a hotel room and having more to spend on dining out.
Well Steel City what did you choose and what would you recommend?
I'm from another Steel City a bit north of you across the border and looking to spend a 4 day weekend in October. I'm leaning to Savannah as this will be a romantic get away from the kids and like I think the strolling and drinking sounds great.
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