U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S. > City vs. City
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
View Poll Results: City MOST like Los Angeles?
Austin 3 1.89%
Raleigh 2 1.26%
San Antonio 5 3.14%
Houston 65 40.88%
Dallas 11 6.92%
Denver 11 6.92%
Orlando 4 2.52%
Salt Lake City 1 0.63%
Oklahoma City 4 2.52%
Miami 53 33.33%
Voters: 159. You may not vote on this poll

Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 08-20-2014, 12:14 AM
 
14,005 posts, read 21,953,057 times
Reputation: 4085

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by DistrictDirt View Post
San Diego has the climate and geography of LA but that's about it. Its like a cleaner, smaller, whiter, less cultural, more conservative, theme park version of LA. Which is to say completely different. I wouldn't want to give up LA for SD, but there are exactly 3 things about San Diego I'm jealous of:

1. Downtown is right on the water
2. Balboa Park
3. Quality of new residential construction seems to be higher there
From an outside perspective, SD seems like a fairly progressive, big, diverse city. I feel like people judge SD by their perspective of LA. Of course SD isn't as Liberal or diverse as LA. But it still has a population of 1 million+ people, and it's still more diverse and progressive than many American cities. I don't understand all the disdain SD gets. I feel like because SD is in the shadow of LA, it's only viewed through it's social contrast with THE 2nd largest and one of THE most culturally Liberal cities in the US, that sits just 2 hours up the road. I feel like if SD was in the shadow of cities like Houston, Dallas, or Atlanta, it would be viewed as a progressive, large, diverse, city, with a nice bio medical sector, and a military presence. But since it's in the shadow of one of the most ethnically diverse, liberal, famous, and 2nd largest city in the US, SD is often viewed as White/Conservative/Vanilla-Ville, ONLY in contrast to how non-White/Conservative/Vanilla LA is. I think folks do this to Orange County also. That's unfortunate. People don't judge SD on it's own merits.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-20-2014, 12:37 AM
 
Location: Who Cares, USA
2,343 posts, read 2,568,438 times
Reputation: 2258
Quote:
Originally Posted by polo89 View Post
But since it's in the shadow of one of the most ethnically diverse, liberal, famous, and 2nd largest city in the US, SD is often viewed as White/Conservative/Vanilla-Ville, ONLY in contrast to how non-White/Conservative/Vanilla LA is. I think folks do this to Orange County also. That's unfortunate. People don't judge SD on it's own merits.
There are quite a few white/conservative/vanilla-ville parts of L.A. too though. Not just the uppity West side neighborhoods, but a fairly large chunk of the West valley. And I'm strictly referring to L.A. proper, not the outlying suburbs. It's not all some big liberal utopia like a lot of people make it out to be. Majority liberal for sure, but not by some huge margin.

That said, I agree that many people outside of California use L.A. as the model to judge SD on... and no, that really isn't fair at all. I'd say that San Diego proper is pretty much politically left-of-center on the whole. More moderate than conservative. Most people only see SD through the eyes of a tourist. In some ways, it does feel and look a lot like a small-scale version of L.A., though SD has it's own unique vibe that separates it. L.A. is more gritty, and it's significantly larger, as it is compared to all of these cities.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-20-2014, 07:02 AM
 
Location: Philadelphia
5,303 posts, read 7,632,341 times
Reputation: 2136
Quote:
Originally Posted by polo89 View Post
From an outside perspective, SD seems like a fairly progressive, big, diverse city. I feel like people judge SD by their perspective of LA. Of course SD isn't as Liberal or diverse as LA. But it still has a population of 1 million+ people, and it's still more diverse and progressive than many American cities. I don't understand all the disdain SD gets. I feel like because SD is in the shadow of LA, it's only viewed through it's social contrast with THE 2nd largest and one of THE most culturally Liberal cities in the US, that sits just 2 hours up the road. I feel like if SD was in the shadow of cities like Houston, Dallas, or Atlanta, it would be viewed as a progressive, large, diverse, city, with a nice bio medical sector, and a military presence. But since it's in the shadow of one of the most ethnically diverse, liberal, famous, and 2nd largest city in the US, SD is often viewed as White/Conservative/Vanilla-Ville, ONLY in contrast to how non-White/Conservative/Vanilla LA is. I think folks do this to Orange County also. That's unfortunate. People don't judge SD on it's own merits.
I've lived in San Diego for 7 years, and I'd say outsiders tend to say the opposite. Many tend to come from the Midwest, and have this strange idea of it. They don't want to live in LA because it, to them, it TOO forward-thinking, TOO diverse, and of course, the prices, smog and traffic. They have this ideal of San Diego being progressive and still really diverse, and basically like Hawaii. However, due to military presence and a lot of older rich folk (mostly White) coming from places like the Midwest or the South for better weather and beaches, there are a ton of Republicans--granted, it is mostly just for fiscal reasons, and they are socially liberal for the most part. It's nowhere near as cultural or diverse as LA, though it is probably because it is smaller. The difference is that most people moving to San Diego (besides military members) are moving for the beach and the weather. In LA, most people are probably moving for work or the big city life, though there are still huge numbers still coming mostly for weather and beaches.

LA and San Diego are also racially segregated. The neighborhoods are not as integrated as they are in NYC, DC Area, or even San Francisco. Not many realize this until they move there.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-20-2014, 08:42 AM
 
1,218 posts, read 2,021,907 times
Reputation: 1309
In some ways, the city of Atlanta always reminded me of a smaller, southern version of Los Angeles without the beaches of course. Sprawl, strip malls, car culture, flashy, big homes, traffic jams, party atmosphere, media & entertainment, gentrifying downtown, economic center, travel hub, etc.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-20-2014, 10:05 AM
 
Location: Seattle, WA
2,945 posts, read 3,594,755 times
Reputation: 3248
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnathanc View Post
In some ways, the city of Atlanta always reminded me of a smaller, southern version of Los Angeles without the beaches of course. Sprawl, strip malls, car culture, flashy, big homes, traffic jams, party atmosphere, media & entertainment, gentrifying downtown, economic center, travel hub, etc.
Atlanta is no where near as dense as LA. LA has a very unique form of dense sprawl that many people incorrectly compare to non-dense sprawled cities like Phoenix or Atlanta. The term "sprawl" is one of those umbrella terms that is rarely used effectively.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-20-2014, 10:13 AM
 
Location: Westside Grand Rapids
3,570 posts, read 3,035,151 times
Reputation: 5492
Quote:
Originally Posted by GatsbyGatz View Post
Atlanta is no where near as dense as LA. LA has a very unique form of dense sprawl that many people incorrectly compare to non-dense sprawled cities like Phoenix or Atlanta. The term "sprawl" is one of those umbrella terms that is rarely used effectively.
I guess it's really a question of what the OP wanted to compare. Noone is trying to say these cities are the LA equivalent, but from a mindset and culture stand point I understand the comparison. Demography stats need, not apply. If that were the case there'd be no point I think.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-20-2014, 10:27 AM
 
Location: Downtown LA
1,192 posts, read 1,225,996 times
Reputation: 847
Quote:
Originally Posted by GatsbyGatz View Post
Atlanta is no where near as dense as LA. LA has a very unique form of dense sprawl that many people incorrectly compare to non-dense sprawled cities like Phoenix or Atlanta. The term "sprawl" is one of those umbrella terms that is rarely used effectively.
^ This. Atlanta has tons of cul-du-sac style subdivisions within the city limits. LA may have bungalows and ranch style houses within its city limits but its all on a tight urban grid. Its dense 1950s style "sprawl", not that 1990s subdivision sprawl. But you can certainly find the cul-du-sac stuff east in San Bernadino County.

LA style dense "sprawl"



Last edited by DistrictDirt; 08-20-2014 at 10:36 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-20-2014, 10:32 AM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
10,087 posts, read 12,561,310 times
Reputation: 3941
There is little about Atlanta that is similar to Los Angeles. Other than having strong car-culture.

Even where Los Angeles, Orange County and the Inland Empire are sprawling they are still sprawling at a much higher density than the majority of Atlanta.

I think the fact that Atlanta has no discernible grid instantly rules it out, as LA's never-ending grid is one of its most important features. Atlanta's thick tree cover also makes it quite different from Los Angeles, which feels like a city cast in cement.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-20-2014, 10:35 AM
 
Location: The Bay
6,920 posts, read 11,881,576 times
Reputation: 3043
The East Bay feels the most similar to LA of anywhere I've seen, they're still different though.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-20-2014, 10:46 AM
 
Location: Downtown LA
1,192 posts, read 1,225,996 times
Reputation: 847
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nineties Flava View Post
The East Bay feels the most similar to LA of anywhere I've seen, they're still different though.
I've heard a lot of people say this. I need to check out Oakland next time I'm in SF.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S. > City vs. City
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top