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View Poll Results: Which city is better for young, urban professionals?
Chicago 51 76.12%
Denver 16 23.88%
Voters: 67. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 03-06-2015, 07:49 PM
 
403 posts, read 400,484 times
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I feel like Chicago would be a better choice for me. I love big, urban cities and it's pretty affordable for such a big city imo. I'm not really an outdoorsy person, so I feel like I wouldn't take advantage of Denver's outdoors scene.

However there are two big concerns about Chicago:

-The weather.

-The state and the city's financial crisis.


The weather in Denver I know I could handle. I'm from Southern California, and I've lived here all my life, so I have been a bit spoiled with nice sunny weather. I do love four-seasons weather though, so I know I would be able to tolerate Denver weather. However, Chicago is a different question. I know their winter is more extreme than Denver's. Will it be hard to adapt to Chicago weather?


I know the state of Illinois and Chicago are both
How would this effect me, as a young professional? Sorry to sound ignorant, but I'm only 19, and would like to know more about this since it's very important. I wouldn't move to Chicago until after college, so that's four years (maybe 5-7) if I decide to get a masters as well. Do you think the city and the state's financial status will improve in the next years or get worse? If I come to Chicago with a decently/well paying job, would that not be a big concern?
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Old 03-10-2015, 12:50 PM
 
403 posts, read 400,484 times
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How would the cost of living in Chicago compare to the cost of living in Denver?
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Old 03-10-2015, 08:11 PM
 
Location: Chicago, IL
2,387 posts, read 1,224,554 times
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Originally Posted by abrandnewme18 View Post
How would the cost of living in Chicago compare to the cost of living in Denver?
To answer your earlier question, in general, the Illinois/Chicago economy won't affect you much directly if you are in a white-collar profession. If you are in medicine; law; consulting; private equity or I-banking; or technology (i.e. a programmer) you'll likely be working for larger/national firms or big hospitals/practices, so you're salary will not likely be affected much. Although anytime an economy is bad (local or national) it can definitely have indirect effects. So if you have a corporate job in one of the mentioned fields, the Illinois/Chicago economy shouldn't directly impact you much.

I don't know what cost of living in Denver is, but Chicago is an "affordable" city, but definitely does not have cheap cost of living like you can find down south. In general, if you want to live by yourself downtown or in any of the neighborhoods that directly surround downtown, you won't find anything cheaper than $1000/month (and that is on the very low end; 1100-1200 is more common). If you want to live in a new construction apartment, you are looking at close to $1600 starting. In terms of everyday COL, one thing to be prepared for are that taxes are really high!! I moved here from a pretty high COL area, and our taxes weren't as high as Chicago taxes. However, other things like public transportation are very affordable. You get great value with public transportation compared to other big cities.

Where the affordability of Chicago comes into play is if you are willing to make a few sacrifices. For example, the farther away from downtown you get, the prices get much better. If you are willing to live in older buildings, the prices get much more affordable. If you live in a house/apt with roommates, you can get some great values. Making some sacrifices like that, you can find places for well under $1000.

I just point this out because if you want to live in a brand new apartment, in a nice neighborhood, right near a CTA (train) stop....you will be in for sticker shock, as it won't seem "affordable." Although, since you're coming from Southern California, it may.
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Old 03-11-2015, 12:54 PM
 
1,288 posts, read 993,305 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by abrandnewme18 View Post
I feel like Chicago would be a better choice for me. I love big, urban cities and it's pretty affordable for such a big city imo. I'm not really an outdoorsy person, so I feel like I wouldn't take advantage of Denver's outdoors scene.

However there are two big concerns about Chicago:

-The weather.

-The state and the city's financial crisis.


The weather in Denver I know I could handle. I'm from Southern California, and I've lived here all my life, so I have been a bit spoiled with nice sunny weather. I do love four-seasons weather though, so I know I would be able to tolerate Denver weather. However, Chicago is a different question. I know their winter is more extreme than Denver's. Will it be hard to adapt to Chicago weather?


I know the state of Illinois and Chicago are both
How would this effect me, as a young professional? Sorry to sound ignorant, but I'm only 19, and would like to know more about this since it's very important. I wouldn't move to Chicago until after college, so that's four years (maybe 5-7) if I decide to get a masters as well. Do you think the city and the state's financial status will improve in the next years or get worse? If I come to Chicago with a decently/well paying job, would that not be a big concern?

Bingo. This is the exact reason why you should go for Chicago. I lived in Denver recently, and while it has many pros, the outdoorsy element is a big part of the glamour of living there.
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Old 03-16-2015, 07:14 PM
 
403 posts, read 400,484 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lovely40 View Post
Bingo. This is the exact reason why you should go for Chicago. I lived in Denver recently, and while it has many pros, the outdoorsy element is a big part of the glamour of living there.
Yeah I mean I live in SoCal now, we tons of outdoor activities to do and I don't take advantage of any of that. I'm fairly active, I go to the gym around 5x a week and try to walk as much as I can. I would much prefer to walk than drive, but I'm just don't do outdoor activities very often.
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