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Old 03-06-2015, 08:30 PM
 
Location: Baghdad by the Bay (San Francisco, California)
3,530 posts, read 4,089,811 times
Reputation: 3145

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Quote:
Originally Posted by sav858 View Post
Was there something I said in my post that wasn't true?

Lol, calm down cowboy. Nobody really cares what some recent transplant wannabe Herb Caen thinks about SF or the Bay Area.

I'm not from the Penninsula btw.
You don't think someone on a relocation site cares what a person who fairly recently moved to an area in question thinks of it?
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Old 03-07-2015, 10:31 AM
 
Location: SF Bay Area
15,404 posts, read 24,380,612 times
Reputation: 8769
Quote:
Originally Posted by dalparadise View Post
You don't think someone on a relocation site cares what a person who fairly recently moved to an area in question thinks of it?
Not from some wannabe Herb Caen from Texas, no I certainly don't lol.
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Old 03-07-2015, 01:14 PM
 
Location: Baghdad by the Bay (San Francisco, California)
3,530 posts, read 4,089,811 times
Reputation: 3145
Quote:
Originally Posted by sav858 View Post
Not from some wannabe Herb Caen from Texas, no I certainly don't lol.
I take the Herb Caen references as a compliment. I was a fan of his column long before I lived here. He's a San Francisco icon. I also can't really think of a much better scenario for happiness and a strong sense of identity than native Texan/naturalized Californian living well in San Francisco.

Sorry that all seems to so negatively consume your thoughts. I can't imagine why, though, unless others' contentment picks at some scab you have for a personal failure in San Francisco.

Keep working, try really hard, save your money, and if you're a good, honest person who does right by others, one day you too may make it here. I would hope for nothing less for you, as it's an awesome place to be. I know it may not always appear that way from there on the dusty fringes. But, from halfway up Russian Hill, looking west at the fog skirting the treetops in the Presidio, with horns on the bridge bellowing, a cool breeze through an open window, John Coltrane playing, and a glass of Sonoma Valley Pinot Noir, it's good living.

You're absolutely right. It's not cheap. To many(mostly on the outside looking in) it's even overpriced. But, live here among vibrant neighborhoods, where a walk home from work takes you from a busy skyscraper district, through a grove of redwoods beside an iconic tower, up the street where Jack Kerouac drank absinthe and was inspired to pen "On the Road" on a single scroll of paper, where the live Jazz in taverns on one side of the street competes with those weird Chinese string bands on the other side, and you'll start to get it.

You can turn right and be in a bar district full of rowdy sports fans, strippers, pizza-by-the-slice, antique stores in red brick buildings, alleyways, a waterfront bustling with tourists just off of a docked cruise ship, and hole-in-the-wall cafes. Turn left and you're on another continent, with kitschy Asian trinkets, authentic Chinese markets, dim sum restaurants, karaoke bars, paper lanterns, and sidewalks so crowded, people spill out onto the street.

Or, keep walking forward up to Washington Square, next to the church where Joe Dimmagio married Marylyn Monroe, and the aromas from the Italian restaurants, chocolate stores, panini joints, and eucalyptus trees in the park commingle with the salty bay air. There's almost always a guitar player or two in the park and a saxophonist up the block a bit, echoing through the alleys. There's a busy beer garden that's slightly out of place for Ground Zero of SF's Little Italy and a new outpost of the City's favorite taco joint, too. Bars and restaurants usually fill up early around here, with tourists on different time zone schedules and patrons of Beach Blanket Babylon or Bimbo's eager to grab a bite before their show. Coit Tower stands watch over all of this in monumental fashion. From there, a hike up Russian Hill gets the blood flowing, past pretty apartment houses, neighborhood eateries, and picture-perfect views of Alcatraz at every intersection. At the top, views of the Golden Gate Bridge appear, along with Sticky Chewy Chocolate Ice Cream at the original Swensen's, if you're so inclined. It's within a couple of blocks of charming neighborhood joints that line the cable car tracks, which remind me of my actual preferred route home--standing on the running boards of a clanging, grinding, hopelessly outdated yet unmistakably elegant mode of transportation while chatting-up tourists who feel like they "discovered" my neighborhood.

For families and those whose priorities lie elsewhere, such as having a lot of space, or a lawn, or good public schools, you are correct: San Francisco itself is a bad fit and is horribly overpriced. That's to its detriment, for sure, as a more welcoming environment to families would benefit the City greatly.

That said, SF is a bit of a different animal in this regard. It's more of the dense urbanized district for the larger "city" of the Bay Area. Though Oakland and San Jose (to a lesser extent) are cities in their own right, with their own identities, together, they and the other communities of the Bay Area make up an amazingly diverse and vibrant urban area with an identity all its own in America, existing within the footprint of a more typical city of its aggregate population size. There are satellite commercial districts, large commercial campuses, retail strip centers, single family homes, university campuses, suburban sprawl, and yes, places for families, within this huge "city". That idea confuses some because geography, a couple of boom-bust cycles, a cataclysmic event and politics have forced the drawing of city limits in ways that don't conform to most American notions of how an urban area is supposed to look and function.

I don't have a need for family amenities, so I am very content to live in a part of the Bay Area that is not very friendly to families, but is quite conducive to a uniquely San Francisco lifestyle. No, it isn't a substitute for New York. Why would anyone want it to be? If I wanted to be in New York, the prices wouldn't be keeping me away, and the opportunities for my profession are actually much greater there.

You seem hung up on this notion of "wannabe". Perhaps you're projecting your own "wannabe" mindset. Is it so hard to fathom that there are people in the Bay Area who find it the most desirable place to live for them? Is it equally baffling that there are people who find San Francisco to be the most desirable place to live in the Bay Area? why else would we pay the prices we pay? Why else would we sacrifice having cars and lawns and space?

I don't know anyone paying the price to live in San Francisco who is pretending it's somewhere else. In fact, my friends, some of whom are from NYC, Chicago, Marin County, The East Bay, and even San Carlos and Foster City, tell me all the time how much they love San Francisco. The ones with kids who've moved away reminisce about living in my neighborhood and their old haunts. When I visit them, I enjoy their part of the Bay Area too.

I wouldn't "wannabe" anywhere else.

Last edited by dalparadise; 03-07-2015 at 01:23 PM..
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Old 03-07-2015, 02:18 PM
 
Location: SF Bay Area
15,404 posts, read 24,380,612 times
Reputation: 8769
Quote:
Originally Posted by dalparadise View Post
I take the Herb Caen references as a compliment. I was a fan of his column long before I lived here. He's a San Francisco icon. I also can't really think of a much better scenario for happiness and a strong sense of identity than native Texan/naturalized Californian living well in San Francisco.

Sorry that all seems to so negatively consume your thoughts. I can't imagine why, though, unless others' contentment picks at some scab you have for a personal failure in San Francisco.

Keep working, try really hard, save your money, and if you're a good, honest person who does right by others, one day you too may make it here. I would hope for nothing less for you, as it's an awesome place to be. I know it may not always appear that way from there on the dusty fringes. But, from halfway up Russian Hill, looking west at the fog skirting the treetops in the Presidio, with horns on the bridge bellowing, a cool breeze through an open window, John Coltrane playing, and a glass of Sonoma Valley Pinot Noir, it's good living.

You're absolutely right. It's not cheap. To many(mostly on the outside looking in) it's even overpriced. But, live here among vibrant neighborhoods, where a walk home from work takes you from a busy skyscraper district, through a grove of redwoods beside an iconic tower, up the street where Jack Kerouac drank absinthe and was inspired to pen "On the Road" on a single scroll of paper, where the live Jazz in taverns on one side of the street competes with those weird Chinese string bands on the other side, and you'll start to get it.

You can turn right and be in a bar district full of rowdy sports fans, strippers, pizza-by-the-slice, antique stores in red brick buildings, alleyways, a waterfront bustling with tourists just off of a docked cruise ship, and hole-in-the-wall cafes. Turn left and you're on another continent, with kitschy Asian trinkets, authentic Chinese markets, dim sum restaurants, karaoke bars, paper lanterns, and sidewalks so crowded, people spill out onto the street.

Or, keep walking forward up to Washington Square, next to the church where Joe Dimmagio married Marylyn Monroe, and the aromas from the Italian restaurants, chocolate stores, panini joints, and eucalyptus trees in the park commingle with the salty bay air. There's almost always a guitar player or two in the park and a saxophonist up the block a bit, echoing through the alleys. There's a busy beer garden that's slightly out of place for Ground Zero of SF's Little Italy and a new outpost of the City's favorite taco joint, too. Bars and restaurants usually fill up early around here, with tourists on different time zone schedules and patrons of Beach Blanket Babylon or Bimbo's eager to grab a bite before their show. Coit Tower stands watch over all of this in monumental fashion. From there, a hike up Russian Hill gets the blood flowing, past pretty apartment houses, neighborhood eateries, and picture-perfect views of Alcatraz at every intersection. At the top, views of the Golden Gate Bridge appear, along with Sticky Chewy Chocolate Ice Cream at the original Swensen's, if you're so inclined. It's within a couple of blocks of charming neighborhood joints that line the cable car tracks, which remind me of my actual preferred route home--standing on the running boards of a clanging, grinding, hopelessly outdated yet unmistakably elegant mode of transportation while chatting-up tourists who feel like they "discovered" my neighborhood.

For families and those whose priorities lie elsewhere, such as having a lot of space, or a lawn, or good public schools, you are correct: San Francisco itself is a bad fit and is horribly overpriced. That's to its detriment, for sure, as a more welcoming environment to families would benefit the City greatly.

That said, SF is a bit of a different animal in this regard. It's more of the dense urbanized district for the larger "city" of the Bay Area. Though Oakland and San Jose (to a lesser extent) are cities in their own right, with their own identities, together, they and the other communities of the Bay Area make up an amazingly diverse and vibrant urban area with an identity all its own in America, existing within the footprint of a more typical city of its aggregate population size. There are satellite commercial districts, large commercial campuses, retail strip centers, single family homes, university campuses, suburban sprawl, and yes, places for families, within this huge "city". That idea confuses some because geography, a couple of boom-bust cycles, a cataclysmic event and politics have forced the drawing of city limits in ways that don't conform to most American notions of how an urban area is supposed to look and function.

I don't have a need for family amenities, so I am very content to live in a part of the Bay Area that is not very friendly to families, but is quite conducive to a uniquely San Francisco lifestyle. No, it isn't a substitute for New York. Why would anyone want it to be? If I wanted to be in New York, the prices wouldn't be keeping me away, and the opportunities for my profession are actually much greater there.

You seem hung up on this notion of "wannabe". Perhaps you're projecting your own "wannabe" mindset. Is it so hard to fathom that there are people in the Bay Area who find it the most desirable place to live for them? Is it equally baffling that there are people who find San Francisco to be the most desirable place to live in the Bay Area? why else would we pay the prices we pay? Why else would we sacrifice having cars and lawns and space?

I don't know anyone paying the price to live in San Francisco who is pretending it's somewhere else. In fact, my friends, some of whom are from NYC, Chicago, Marin County, The East Bay, and even San Carlos and Foster City, tell me all the time how much they love San Francisco. The ones with kids who've moved away reminisce about living in my neighborhood and their old haunts. When I visit them, I enjoy their part of the Bay Area too.

I wouldn't "wannabe" anywhere else.
All I did is offer a possible explanation of why SF is more expensive than NYC, said nothing about really derogatory about it nor anything indicating I didn't think it was one of America's premier cities as well. You in turn go on some completely off topic rant about outsiders and people on the Peninsula and then just now write the longest essay about about stuff I already know and wasn't asking about, it's really bizarre what you respond with sometimes. And I have still yet to hear what I said wasn't true.

So I'm not really sure how you deduced that I have a problem with you or others loving SF. My label of you surely doesn't indicate I really care , its more of just an observation really. I also fully understand why people love it and pay what they do to live here and never indicated otherwise, perhaps you read too much into my comments with your defense wannabe Herb Caen transplant mindset.

For claiming the suburbs and its people are such an afterthought for you, you sure did write quite a long essay in response to someone from the "dusty fringes", especially considering none of your recent rants directed at me even addressed or had anything to do with what I said. Perhaps you should maybe lay off the Sonoma Valley Pinot Noir if you're going to post on City Data, it's pretty obvious it's puts you into a defensive mode about SF lol.
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Old 03-07-2015, 02:36 PM
 
Location: Baghdad by the Bay (San Francisco, California)
3,530 posts, read 4,089,811 times
Reputation: 3145
Quote:
Originally Posted by sav858 View Post
All I did is offer a possible explanation of why SF is more expensive than NYC, said nothing about really derogatory about it nor anything indicating I didn't think it was one of America's premier cities as well. You in turn go on some completely off topic rant about outsiders and people on the Peninsula and then just now write the longest essay about about stuff I already know and wasn't asking about, it's really bizarre what you respond with sometimes. And I have still yet to hear what I said wasn't true.

So I'm not really sure how you deduced that I have a problem with you or others loving SF. My label of you surely doesn't indicate I really care , its more of just an observation really. I also fully understand why people love it and pay what they do to live here and never indicated otherwise, perhaps you read too much into my comments with your defense wannabe Herb Caen transplant mindset.

For claiming the suburbs and its people are such an afterthought for you, you sure did write quite a long essay in response to someone from the "dusty fringes", especially considering none of your recent rants directed at me even addressed or had anything to do with what I said. Perhaps you should maybe lay off the Sonoma Valley Pinot Noir if you're going to post on City Data, it's pretty obvious it's puts you into a defensive mode about SF lol.
Hmm. I thought you didn't care to read it.
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Old 03-07-2015, 03:00 PM
 
Location: SF Bay Area
15,404 posts, read 24,380,612 times
Reputation: 8769
Quote:
Originally Posted by dalparadise View Post
Hmm. I thought you didn't care to read it.
I read it, doesn't mean I care what you think...
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Old 06-03-2015, 11:35 PM
 
Location: Baghdad by the Bay (San Francisco, California)
3,530 posts, read 4,089,811 times
Reputation: 3145
There are several people on this board who list their location as the "Bay Area," (outside SF) and seem to inexplicably take it personally that there are those of us living in San Francisco who actually enjoy being here. Some even list the presence of people who enjoy living in SF as one of the most negative aspects of "living in the City" (though a few of the ones saying this have never, in fact, actually lived here).

So, anyone enjoying a good life in SF is either not well traveled enough, a "wannabe," delusional, etc.? Interesting perspectives.

There must be something pretty interesting going on here to warrant the growth rate and skyrocketing rents and to so consume the thoughts of people living on fringes, don't you think?
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Old 06-04-2015, 01:23 AM
 
Location: SF Bay Area
15,404 posts, read 24,380,612 times
Reputation: 8769
^lol,You really should lay off the Sonoma Valley Pinot if you're going to post. No one had any issue with you or anyone else loving SF or questioned why it's desirable. Your random post several months later makes even less sense than before. Honestly, what posts are you even responding to or addressing because your little diatribe is completely out of left field and has nothing to do with what's been said.
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Old 06-04-2015, 07:48 AM
 
Location: Baghdad by the Bay (San Francisco, California)
3,530 posts, read 4,089,811 times
Reputation: 3145
Perhaps it makes less sense to you because my post wasn't necessarily directed at you. I thought that you pretty well established that you discounted my position. You do seem determined to place yourself in the category I describe, though. Why is that?

And what's all the "cowboy" and "lay off the Pinot" stuff? Again, as a site concerned with relocation, why would you think no one would be interested in the perspective of someone who relocated here?
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Old 06-04-2015, 08:16 AM
 
Location: SF Bay Area
15,404 posts, read 24,380,612 times
Reputation: 8769
No one including myself discounted whatever position you have with how much you like SF, what are you rambling on about in this thread? It honestly makes no sense, you seem to be arguing with some imaginary posts that were never made.

What's with reviving a dead thread with a post that has nothing to do with anything anyone else has even said so far?
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