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View Poll Results: Better January weather?
Santa Monica 29 47.54%
Miami Beach 32 52.46%
Voters: 61. You may not vote on this poll

 
 
Old 03-06-2015, 08:45 PM
 
Location: Westminster/Huntington Beach, CA
1,780 posts, read 1,136,816 times
Reputation: 1178

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Quote:
Originally Posted by SDPMiami View Post
What you get about 10" of rain a year, Phoenix gets 8. What's the big difference? When does the desert begin and end
I like to think that everything from about 5-10 miles inland all the way to the foothill communities experience some sort of Mediterranean climate/ecosystem. Then you get into areas of the IE which definitely feel as hot as the desert sometimes, and just as dry, yet you still see areas of oak woodland. Just much more desolate than everything to the west of it. This is what I feel is one of the ugliest parts of CA, especially areas like Redlands, Moreno Valley, Hemet. The built environment isn't that terrible, but its wedged between two mountain ranges and feels like the ugly transition from coastal to desert. Then, once you get past the San Bernardino Mountains, pure desert in every sense of the word. You can immensely tell the difference between the three environments I mentioned.

But, on paper, a desert is usually described as a place that averages less than 9.75 inches (25 cm) of rainfall per year.
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Old 03-06-2015, 10:14 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles
2,412 posts, read 1,764,257 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NativeOrange View Post
I like to think that everything from about 5-10 miles inland all the way to the foothill communities experience some sort of Mediterranean climate/ecosystem. Then you get into areas of the IE which definitely feel as hot as the desert sometimes, and just as dry, yet you still see areas of oak woodland. Just much more desolate than everything to the west of it. This is what I feel is one of the ugliest parts of CA, especially areas like Redlands, Moreno Valley, Hemet. The built environment isn't that terrible, but its wedged between two mountain ranges and feels like the ugly transition from coastal to desert. Then, once you get past the San Bernardino Mountains, pure desert in every sense of the word. You can immensely tell the difference between the three environments I mentioned.

But, on paper, a desert is usually described as a place that averages less than 9.75 inches (25 cm) of rainfall per year.
redlands is actually a very nice city... lots of orange groves and victorian residences surrounded by gardens plus its a very well kept city (south of the 10 Fwy) with tons of vegetation and palms.

but you are right of hemet and moreno valley, those places look and feel like Indio, CA, by far the ugliest cities in the Los Angeles Area.
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Old 03-06-2015, 10:24 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles
2,412 posts, read 1,764,257 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NativeOrange View Post
But, on paper, a desert is usually described as a place that averages less than 9.75 inches (25 cm) of rainfall per year.
because the vast majority of LA Area will see 80s and 90s for the next 10 days, he claims we are a desert, that is just ignorant right there.

And because our 90s and 80s days will be followed by 50s and 60s nights he is further claiming we are a desert, again, i don't get it. that's a 30 F diurnal range, deserts arent the only place that see this.

our normal rainfall is about 15 inches, not below 10''

(im not complaining at you, dont take it as that way, im just pointing out the flaws in his claim)
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Old 03-06-2015, 11:54 PM
 
Location: Westminster/Huntington Beach, CA
1,780 posts, read 1,136,816 times
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I know you aren't and agree with you about Redlands. My aunt used to live there years ago and we would visit her often. Just didn't know if things have changed there for better or worse.
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Old 03-07-2015, 05:33 AM
 
14,006 posts, read 21,956,970 times
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IE, San Bernardino/Riverside, are the transition zones it seems. Do they still give off a coastal vibe? Like you said, you'd still find Oaks in these towns.
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Old 03-07-2015, 06:47 AM
 
Location: Chicago, IL
2,380 posts, read 1,215,289 times
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Living in Chicago, both sound good in January to me! The question is about January weather, and I've never been to either in January but I'm sure both are fine. Every time I've been to Miami, it's been late spring or summer and the humidity has been almost unbearable. Loved the city, but it was hard for me to take the humidity. I loved the weather when I was in LA. I think I'd pick Santa Monica if we were talking about year-round weather.
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Old 03-07-2015, 08:56 AM
 
Location: Phoenix
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SDPMiami View Post
Yes and it's perfect, I'm outside now on my patio. The beach is packed, and tonight you will be able to relax outside with a bottle of wine, and a cigarette and short sleeves
Quote:
Originally Posted by SDPMiami View Post
Dry air is worse for the lungs, just saying
After I quit drinking, Florida lost its charm for me. I too used to hang out at the beach and causeways and drink. Like a typical "salt life" cracker I thought I was just in laid- back heaven.

But I gave up that lifestyle for healthy living out west, and low humidity is essential to it. I'm buying a high end mountain bike today, and will explore this beautiful Sonoran Desert on it.
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Old 03-07-2015, 10:12 AM
 
14,006 posts, read 21,956,970 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by New Horizons View Post





After I quit drinking, Florida lost its charm for me. I too used to hang out at the beach and causeways and drink. Like a typical "salt life" cracker I thought I was just in laid- back heaven.

But I gave up that lifestyle for healthy living out west, and low humidity is essential to it. I'm buying a high end mountain bike today, and will explore this beautiful Sonoran Desert on it.
I guess you were just a little lazy in Florida. I know plenty of healthy crossfit types in South Florida. Yeah there's still the lazy, laidback, beach-bum, parrot head crackers, but there's more than enough healthy types.
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Old 03-07-2015, 11:20 AM
 
Location: Miami Beach, FL/Tokyo, Japan
1,699 posts, read 1,479,278 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by New Horizons View Post
But I gave up that lifestyle for healthy living out west, and low humidity is essential to it. I'm buying a high end mountain bike today, and will explore this beautiful Sonoran Desert on it.
Well you can mountain bike. While what I do is several times a week is go swimming and/or snorkeling. There is a place in miami beach (1st) where the rocks bring in a lot of sea life: tropical fishes, manta rays, sharks, sea turtles. And it's relaxing as well as an exercise at the same time.

For body sculpting stuff, I stick to bread and butter fitness gym.
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Old 03-07-2015, 12:13 PM
 
Location: Westminster/Huntington Beach, CA
1,780 posts, read 1,136,816 times
Reputation: 1178
Quote:
Originally Posted by polo89 View Post
IE, San Bernardino/Riverside, are the transition zones it seems. Do they still give off a coastal vibe? Like you said, you'd still find Oaks in these towns.
Definitely a different vibe. The IE is considered the birthplace of the "bro" type, which is just like a glorified hillbilly in dickies shorts and the monster logo plastered on all their dirt bikes and gas guzzling trucks.

Obviously not going to generalize or speak for everyone who lives there, but it doesn't have the best reputation. Only time I see the IE is when I'm passing through on my way to Vegas, Palm Springs, Havasu, etc.
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