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View Poll Results: Better January weather?
Santa Monica 29 47.54%
Miami Beach 32 52.46%
Voters: 61. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 03-06-2015, 12:14 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles
2,412 posts, read 1,769,175 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SDPMiami View Post
50s at night is cold. 50s at nights for Miami means everyone is in a jacket.

Your zip is in avocado heights, a desert. The reason you're making it up to 80F is because there is no moisture in the air. It's easier to heat up the air when it's thin. In Miami, the moisture in the air makes it feel warmer than our low 80s.
It's nice night temps, nights are comfortable. Avocado heights isn't a desert, san Gabriel valley isn't a desert, downtown LA isn't a desert, east LA isn't a desert, Downey isn't a desert, Anaheim isn't a desert, Santa ana isn't a desert... etc.

If you think we are a desert then just stop
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Old 03-06-2015, 12:17 PM
 
Location: Westminster/Huntington Beach, CA
1,780 posts, read 1,141,068 times
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Desert nights are amazing in summer. It's still very warm but it's not lung-cloggingly oppressive.
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Old 03-06-2015, 12:31 PM
 
Location: Miami Beach, FL/Tokyo, Japan
1,699 posts, read 1,483,692 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by L.A.-Mex View Post
It's nice night temps, nights are comfortable. Avocado heights isn't a desert, san Gabriel valley isn't a desert, downtown LA isn't a desert, east LA isn't a desert, Downey isn't a desert, Anaheim isn't a desert, Santa ana isn't a desert... etc.

If you think we are a desert then just stop
What you get about 10" of rain a year, Phoenix gets 8. What's the big difference? When does the desert begin and end
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Old 03-06-2015, 12:32 PM
 
Location: Miami Beach, FL/Tokyo, Japan
1,699 posts, read 1,483,692 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NativeOrange View Post
Desert nights are amazing in summer. It's still very warm but it's not lung-cloggingly oppressive.
Dry air is worse for the lungs, just saying
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Old 03-06-2015, 12:38 PM
 
1,039 posts, read 823,595 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SDPMiami View Post
Then I stand corrected. I always assume a 30F differential for a desert climate.

But it probably still feels cooler than a Miami night but maybe I'm wrong
Personally, I've felt cooler in Phoenix at night. Both are still pretty warm though. And all the concrete and metal traps the heat, making Phoenix nights warmer than a place like Prescott, AZ.
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Old 03-06-2015, 12:59 PM
 
3,200 posts, read 1,978,160 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SDPMiami View Post
What you get about 10" of rain a year, Phoenix gets 8. What's the big difference? When does the desert begin and end
L.A's rainfall patterns are erratic; some years get 4-6 inches while others get over 30. Average is 15 but it's more like we get less than 10 inches for 3-4 years in a row and then get more than 20 for an El Nino year and then back to the dry pattern again. The main thing that would annoy you the most about our climate is that we always have to "sacrifice" warmth to get rain to the point that most Angelenos think the words "rain" and "cold" pretty much synonymous to the point if they look out the window and see water falling from the sky, they put on their heaviest jackets before going outside. Wet winters are always colder than normal and dry winters are usually warmer than normal. If you show video clips of people running around in shorts and tank tops in the rain, they assume the people are very cold hardy without realizing that rain can be warm.

Rain in L.A= highs in the 50s and low 60s
Drought winters have more highs in the 70s, some 80s, and even occasional 90s (with lows in the 40s and 50s mostly).
If L.A to have average high temperatures of 75 F in every winter month, we would go down to about 1-2 inches of rain a year. Our climate almost never gets rain at temperatures above 70 F.
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Old 03-06-2015, 01:42 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ABrandNewWorld View Post
True dat. In winter heat waves, it's common to see places like Anaheim have nighttime lows in the 40s followed by highs in the upper 80s/low 90s. In summer, the valleys often see highs of over 100 after nights in the upper 50s. It's even possible for certain spots to have a high of 110 F after a low of 55 F. In Miami, the day/night range is very narrow like 80/70 in winter and 90/80 in summer.

Yet, L.A-Mex only uses daytime highs (except for bragging about how frostproof Santa Monica) is when comparing L.A to other locations to prove our "godly heat". The ironic thing is most Angelenos consider cool nights a virtue because you can open the windows at night rather than cranking the AC 24/7 (like you probably do in Miami in summer). Also our heat indexes in summer are among the lowest in the U.S, even in the inland valleys. A dry 95 F feels cooler than a humid 88 F. But for whatever reason, L.A-Mex is determined to "prove" to others that L.A. is the hottest climate in the U.S. in every season and could grow any kind of tropical vegetation with irrigation.
I don't prove "godly heat" what is wrong with you, I've never said we are hotter than death valley, or Phoenix, Bangkok, etc.

All I do os provide factual data.

Read my posts and don't go on putting false words in my mouth.
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Old 03-06-2015, 01:45 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SDPMiami View Post
What you get about 10" of rain a year, Phoenix gets 8. What's the big difference? When does the desert begin and end
Cities from Santa ana inland are all forecasted to see 80s for the next 10 days, even some 90s possibly, LA basin and valleys aren't desert, no matter how you look at it. And we get more than 10 inches of rain.
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Old 03-06-2015, 01:48 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles
2,412 posts, read 1,769,175 times
Reputation: 489
Quote:
Originally Posted by ABrandNewWorld View Post
L.A's rainfall patterns are erratic; some years get 4-6 inches while others get over 30. Average is 15 but it's more like we get less than 10 inches for 3-4 years in a row and then get more than 20 for an El Nino year and then back to the dry pattern again. The main thing that would annoy you the most about our climate is that we always have to "sacrifice" warmth to get rain to the point that most Angelenos think the words "rain" and "cold" pretty much synonymous to the point if they look out the window and see water falling from the sky, they put on their heaviest jackets before going outside. Wet winters are always colder than normal and dry winters are usually warmer than normal. If you show video clips of people running around in shorts and tank tops in the rain, they assume the people are very cold hardy without realizing that rain can be warm.

Rain in L.A= highs in the 50s and low 60s
Drought winters have more highs in the 70s, some 80s, and even occasional 90s (with lows in the 40s and 50s mostly).
If L.A to have average high temperatures of 75 F in every winter month, we would go down to about 1-2 inches of rain a year. Our climate almost never gets rain at temperatures above 70 F.
Almost never?

This past summer we saw rain, this winter we saw rains at 70 F as well. Don't you remember I quoted you?

Sure summer rains aren't a normal for us but they do happen once in a while and when they do they bring rains in 70s and humid conditions.
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Old 03-06-2015, 02:18 PM
 
Location: Westminster/Huntington Beach, CA
1,780 posts, read 1,141,068 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SDPMiami View Post
Dry air is worse for the lungs, just saying
That's ok. We have moderate humidity year round on the coast. So 1-2 days in the desert isn't gonna kill me.

Plus I smoke. So not really worried about weather affecting my lungs.
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