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Old 03-22-2015, 12:10 PM
 
12,356 posts, read 18,223,134 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sleepless in Bham View Post
What can you do in Atlanta as a blk gay male that you can't do in Houston?

As for those who are bother by seeing sweetheart on a internet forum you need to get over yourselves and that tired homophobia act.
It doesn't have to do with homophobia; the way he said it was a little belittling or smart.

Also, what I was trynna say is it seems that the gays here are more integrated with everyone else instead of having their own district, stores, etc. like people say Atlanta does.
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Old 03-22-2015, 12:13 PM
 
12,356 posts, read 18,223,134 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
Houston isn't on the level of Atlanta, DC, and NYC and is a good example of a secondary city along with the other cities which I alluded to. Although Chicago still has a strong African American community in place, it's bleeding Blacks right now; Detroit and Philadelphia lack the strong professional Black network seen in Atlanta, DC, and NYC.



You've got this reversed; Chicago, Detroit, and Philadelphia are more blue-collar whereas Atlanta and DC in particular are much more white-collar; you DEFINITELY have to have the degrees to move up in DC. It can probably go either way in Houston.
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Old 03-22-2015, 12:16 PM
 
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I was in Austin for SXSW this weekend, and this black kid from Detroit was telling me how he attended UT and decided to make Austin home. He asked me where I lived, and I told him Houston. He was saying how the black kids at UT want to move to Houston because they feel like they are at "home." That content in the conversation spoke for itself.
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Old 03-22-2015, 12:32 PM
 
Location: Metro Birmingham, AL
1,673 posts, read 2,357,535 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SouthernBoy205 View Post
It doesn't have to do with homophobia; the way he said it was a little belittling or smart.

Also, what I was trynna say is it seems that the gays here are more integrated with everyone else instead of having their own district, stores, etc. like people say Atlanta does.
That's why I was asking what is the difference between the two when it comes to GBM. To me on the surface there isn't really one.
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Old 03-22-2015, 12:44 PM
 
Location: Metro Birmingham, AL
1,673 posts, read 2,357,535 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SouthernBoy205 View Post
I was in Austin for SXSW this weekend, and this black kid from Detroit was telling me how he attended UT and decided to make Austin home. He asked me where I lived, and I told him Houston. He was saying how the black kids at UT want to move to Houston because they feel like they are at "home." That content in the conversation spoke for itself.
Houston is becoming a moving destination for blacks, cool. No need to compare to ATL or DC.
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Old 03-22-2015, 12:52 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,252 posts, read 26,220,119 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ant131531 View Post
Does it matter? If blacks want to live in suburbs, they can.
We already know they live in the suburbs. I was asking if there were any large concentrations of Black professionals in walkable, core neighborhoods.
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Old 03-22-2015, 01:09 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SouthernBoy205 View Post
It's not; there's a general consensus here that Houston is in the secondary tier so it's not just me saying that.
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Old 03-22-2015, 01:09 PM
 
56,534 posts, read 80,824,285 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by goofy328 View Post
They can, but more Blacks are experiencing greater wealth in the areas we're mentioning, particularly transients (although clearly, some Blacks are experiencing even greater wealth in the cities you've mentioned). Also depends on your education, you can come up in Atlanta, DC, NYC and Houston without a lot of education, whereas in Chicago, Detroit, and Philadelphia you're better off if you're over-educated in those towns.

You also have to look at the migration patterns. There is a reverse migration from Northern Black meccas to these newer, younger, Southern Black meccas. I've done it, Akron/Cleveland is no Black mecca but I'm getting more mileage for my situation here than I was back in Ohio. Doesn't necessarily mean that I can't or should not improve my situation but it does speak volumes to the opportunities that are available in the South, or those that continue to remain in NYC (for those that are in a position to take advantage of them).
To be honest, many of these Southern areas had institutions intact that helped form a Black middle class decades ago. It is just that within the past 30 years or so, select Southern areas have gotten some buzz due to an steady economic shift and people with immediate roots in the South moving back.
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Old 03-22-2015, 01:21 PM
 
Location: San Antonio
5,286 posts, read 4,155,936 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
Houston isn't on the level of Atlanta, DC, and NYC and is a good example of a secondary city along with the other cities which I alluded to. Although Chicago still has a strong African American community in place, it's bleeding Blacks right now; Detroit and Philadelphia lack the strong professional Black network seen in Atlanta, DC, and NYC.



You've got this reversed; Chicago, Detroit, and Philadelphia are more blue-collar whereas Atlanta and DC in particular are much more white-collar; you DEFINITELY have to have the degrees to move up in DC. It can probably go either way in Houston.
Nowadays I wouldn't even say Houston isn't on the same level as Atlanta. If one looks at things like average income, education, and poverty, they'll see that these two cities are closer in "black value" than most are willing to admit; namely those who have little to no experience with Houston.

Atlanta largely benefits from having a larger black population, but greater quantity does not equal greater quality. You have more of the good but you also have more of the bad as well. The problems and attitudes that plague the black community are as visible there as anywhere else, if not more so.

Sure, Atlanta is a hub for black entertainment and consumerism, but what is really being done in that city that is benefiting Black America as a whole? In DC you atleast have blacks working on issues that impact the entire nation. In my opinion that puts it in the top tier alone, with Atlanta and Houston in the second.
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Old 03-22-2015, 01:27 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,252 posts, read 26,220,119 times
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Article about the Black professional scene in Dallas.

Quote:
Black professionals who have moved to Dallas say they often don’t see other blacks at their corporate headquarters, in their neighborhood grocery stores in Uptown or Lakewood, or at happy hours downtown.

That was Payne’s experience when she first moved to Dallas in the fall of 2006. Like many thirtysomethings on a fast-track career path, Payne was ambitious. She graduated magna *** laude from Harvard College, got her MBA from Harvard Business School, and worked 12-hour days in New York before getting offered the big promotion. Despite her social concerns about Dallas, she wasn’t going to let them get in the way of her career path.

She bought a one-way ticket, stopped at a BMW dealership to pick up a car, and drove to her newly purchased condominium in Uptown. As the days passed, Payne was pleased with some of the perks of her new life: an easy commute to her office in Uptown and a much lower cost of living, which allowed her to upgrade to a 1,750-square-foot condominium, more than double the space she had in Brooklyn.

But one thing was immediately troubling. In New York, she never had a problem finding a crowd of black professionals, in restaurants, at the gym. Here, when she went out after work, she often was the only black person in sight.
Why Young Black Professionals Are Wary of Dallas - D Magazine
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