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Old 03-16-2015, 12:08 PM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
18,207 posts, read 25,896,902 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SDPMiami View Post
Usually I associate eye rolling with women
Point is you're full of it regarding the black community in Houston.
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Old 03-16-2015, 12:13 PM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
18,207 posts, read 25,896,902 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MDAllstar View Post
Air Force One's in a club? Only in the south. That is not club attire.
If it was a lounge, it's not out of the ordinary. I've seen people just wear those in every city I been to whether Houston, DC, Chicago, NY, or Miami. Clubs, no.
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Old 03-16-2015, 12:17 PM
 
12,201 posts, read 17,562,133 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mentallect View Post
LOL, I understand. I just don't think that whether somebody else wasn't feeling Dallas or not, you don't have to paint Dallas as some type of backwards, anti-black place in order to make Houston look appealing to blacks, because that's not true at all.

I agree that Houston is right behind DC and Atlanta for black folks, but Dallas is right behind Houston. The only thing that Houston has that would appeal specifically to black people that Dallas doesn't is HBCUs. But if you're talking about a place for professional blacks, that doesn't matter anyway because if they are already in their profession, then they're already through with school. Dallas is currently getting just as many if not more professional black transplants as Houston, so the difference really isn't that big. At the rate that Dallas is getting professional black transplants, give it another decade and you probably really won't be able to see much of a difference between Houston and Dallas for professional black transplants. Especially since professional black transplants in Dallas are moving all over the Northern suburbs and to the mid-cities now, contrary to popular belief.
No way! I'm not like that at all. She said it.
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Old 03-16-2015, 12:18 PM
 
12,201 posts, read 17,562,133 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SDPMiami View Post
When I think of black meccas I don't think of Houston or Dallas but both have black communities, and at least in the case of Houston are in "ok" shape. I mean, the ghetto areas of Houston, the blighted areas of Houston are indeed in majority the black ones. A lot of clubs in Houston in the loop enforce selective clothing policy in keeping the "ratchet" crowd out. Case in point, I don't even remember the name, but it was some roof top bar, and my asian friend had air force ones. He was denied entry, but the bouncer was apologetic and admitted to him "it's beyond my hands, and it's a shame because you're not the type we're trying to keep out."

But that being said, Houston is doing better than many other cities. Cough cough, Detroit.

Still when it comes to Black Meccas, Atlanta is head and shoulders above everything. If I was Black, I'd park myself in Atlanta. It's basically the black Los Angeles.
Houston is not Miami.
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Old 03-16-2015, 12:19 PM
 
52,614 posts, read 75,426,573 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mentallect View Post
Overall, this is the way I look at it. Whenever the topic of "best places for black people/professional blacks to live" comes up, someone inevitably always starts naming the blackest cities they can think of just because they are predominately or heavily black, whether they actually meet the criteria of good cities for blacks to live in or not (places like Memphis, Jackson, Birmingham, New Orleans, Detroit, etc.). But to me, it's better to live in a city that's only, say, 30% black but is a productive and thriving community for EVERYBODY, as well as black people, versus living somewhere that's 50+% black but has a terrible economy, is filled with poverty and crime stricken neighborhoods, horrible schools, low wage jobs, etc. If you move somewhere like that just because it has a reputation as a heavily black city, then don't complain that the black community there is "behind," "uncultured/uneducated," "not unified," or "stagnant," because you basically set yourself up for it by trying to be somewhere just because there are plenty of people there who look like you, regardless of what type of people they are and how the city affects them or is influenced by them.
I think you have to think about the metro as a whole and if you can still find areas within it that fit what you are looking for. Just to use the Boston area, while the area may have a certain image in regards to the topic, a person may find an area like northern Milton as an area that fit what they are looking for in terms of demographics, schools, proximity to cultural amenities and houses of worship, among other things. So, it may be a matter of doing proper research as well.
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Old 03-16-2015, 12:30 PM
 
2,029 posts, read 1,429,792 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
I think you have to think about the metro as a whole and if you can still find areas within it that fit what you are looking for. Just to use the Boston area, while the area may have a certain image in regards to the topic, a person may find an area like northern Milton as an area that fit what they are looking for in terms of demographics, schools, proximity to cultural amenities and houses of worship, among other things. So, it may be a matter of doing proper research as well.
That's true, but to me, the core city of a region is still too important and too vital to neglect its impact on the entire region. For example, for all the flack they get, Detroit and St. Louis both have some very nice, very affluent suburbs. But there is too much that comes along with being so close to and being tied to those actual cities for me to want to live in those metros, even if I did live in one of their nice, clean, quiet, affluent suburbs.
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Old 03-16-2015, 12:35 PM
 
52,614 posts, read 75,426,573 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mentallect View Post
That's true, but to me, the core city of a region is still too important and too vital to neglect its impact on the entire region. For example, for all the flack they get, Detroit and St. Louis both have some very nice, very affluent suburbs. But there is too much that comes along with being so close to and being tied to those actual cities for me to want to live in those metros, even if I did live in one of their nice, clean, quiet, affluent suburbs.
I see what you are saying and even agree that the city plays an important factor. On the other hand, those both pretty big metros and even within these cities, you can/may find areas that are solid.
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Old 03-16-2015, 12:51 PM
 
Location: At my house in my state
637 posts, read 647,289 times
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I've never seen one black person in Texas, and I lived in Sanantonio/Dallas/Houston for 3 years
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Old 03-16-2015, 01:11 PM
 
Location: Miami Beach, FL/Tokyo, Japan
1,699 posts, read 1,479,278 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Spade View Post
Point is you're full of it regarding the black community in Houston.
Well I'm not Black so I won't argue it, maybe Houston has something I missed.

As someone who lived in both Atlanta and Houston, Atlanta always struck me as head and shoulders above Houston when it comes to things like an energetic and fashionable black community. Simply put there seems to be more energy, upward mobility, higher status and awareness in Atlanta's black community than Houston's. Also there seems to be more to do for black's in Atlanta than Houston.

One interesting thing about Atlanta is it has clubs who cater to blacks, and whites. As usual. But the clubs that cater to whites will almost always have nights that cater to blacks, which is not very common. By cater, I'm talking music choices as well as general crowd it pulls. Anyways, I mentioned the door policy earlier, which is also geared to blacks, since it allows some of the hip-hop fashion inside even an upscale club, that is usually banned. Just give them extra money at the door, it's not under the table, it's policy.

Houston on the other hand struck me as more of a regular city with black people there.
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Old 03-16-2015, 01:25 PM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
18,207 posts, read 25,896,902 times
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Originally Posted by scarecrow- View Post
I've never seen one black person in Texas, and I lived in Sanantonio/Dallas/Houston for 3 years
Uh huh
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