U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S. > City vs. City
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
View Poll Results: Which of these small Mid-Atlantic cities has the best architecture?
Allentown, PA 1 7.69%
Harrisburg, PA 5 38.46%
Lancaster, PA 3 23.08%
Reading, PA 1 7.69%
Wilmington, DE 0 0%
Albany, NY 3 23.08%
Trenton, NJ 0 0%
Voters: 13. You may not vote on this poll

 
 
Old 03-17-2015, 08:03 AM
 
275 posts, read 297,314 times
Reputation: 302

Advertisements

The architecture of these cities is usually overshadowed by the likes of Philadelphia, New York, and Baltimore. But all are old, row-house cities with neighborhoods that rival those of their larger counterparts.
Quick reply to this message

 
Old 03-19-2015, 11:06 AM
 
275 posts, read 297,314 times
Reputation: 302
I forgot to add New Castle, Delaware. Another great row-house town
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-19-2015, 12:07 PM
 
Location: Prince George's County, Maryland
6,212 posts, read 7,031,756 times
Reputation: 2581
You also forgot Frederick, Annapolis, Salisbury, and Hagerstown in Maryland.

I would also add Cape May, New Jersey and Alexandria, VA.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-19-2015, 12:22 PM
 
275 posts, read 297,314 times
Reputation: 302
Quote:
Originally Posted by tcave360 View Post
You also forgot Frederick, Annapolis, Salisbury, and Hagerstown in Maryland.

I would also add Cape May, New Jersey and Alexandria, VA.
The original cities are all roughly the same size. Most of the cities you listed, as well as New Castle, are smaller.

I don't really count Alexandria because like Georgetown, it has become absorbed by DC.

On a related noted, does anyone know why rowhouses are so prevalent in the Mid-Atlantic and nowhere else in the US? Even small towns in PA, MD, and DE have impressive stocks of rowhouses. I get why there aren't rowhouses in the South and West, but I don't understand why there aren't more rowhouses in New England towns.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-19-2015, 01:01 PM
 
Location: Prince George's County, Maryland
6,212 posts, read 7,031,756 times
Reputation: 2581
Quote:
Originally Posted by Frank Bones View Post
The original cities are all roughly the same size. Most of the cities you listed, as well as New Castle, are smaller.

I don't really count Alexandria because like Georgetown, it has become absorbed by DC.

On a related noted, does anyone know why rowhouses are so prevalent in the Mid-Atlantic and nowhere else in the US? Even small towns in PA, MD, and DE have impressive stocks of rowhouses. I get why there aren't rowhouses in the South and West, but I don't understand why there aren't more rowhouses in New England towns.
They have to be roughly the same size?

And Alexandria has been an independent city since it voted to secede from DC in order to preserve its slave trade prior to the advent of the Civil War and DC strictly banning the practice.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-19-2015, 08:32 PM
 
11,894 posts, read 9,612,778 times
Reputation: 16274
Quote:
Originally Posted by tcave360 View Post
They have to be roughly the same size?

And Alexandria has been an independent city since it voted to secede from DC in order to preserve its slave trade prior to the advent of the Civil War and DC strictly banning the practice.
Cape May is small and its population in the offseason (so between Labor Day and Memorial Day) hovers around 3500. I can see the distinction the OP is making, however Cape May has truly notable, remarkable architecture. I mean the entire town is on the National Historic Registry.

Also OP, New York City and North Jersey have their fair share of row houses - just in a slightly different form. Brownstones are common up and around here. The Upper West Side is to die for, its architecture of gorgeous old brownstones is beautiful. But by many, and the Census!, NY and Northern NJ are also mid-Atlantic, at least the NYC/Long Island area is. You're right, though, New England does not really. Not sure why… Boston does have some row houses, though, I thought?
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-21-2015, 07:51 AM
 
275 posts, read 297,314 times
Reputation: 302
Quote:
Originally Posted by tcave360 View Post
They have to be roughly the same size?

And Alexandria has been an independent city since it voted to secede from DC in order to preserve its slave trade prior to the advent of the Civil War and DC strictly banning the practice.
It's easier to compare cities of similar size.

I know Alexandria is technically an independent city, but it is within the DC metro.
Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:
Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S. > City vs. City
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top