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Old 03-26-2015, 12:36 AM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
18,259 posts, read 25,993,790 times
Reputation: 9022

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DC slowed down considerably. 156k moved to Houston? Wow. But chicago is the one that is surprising. Less than 10k moved there over the past year. Ouch.
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Old 03-26-2015, 12:59 AM
 
672 posts, read 974,723 times
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We Houstonians can tell. Development is booming. On my little street alone in the Humble area of northeast Harris County I've seen 6 new houses sprout up within the last 2 months. A plethora of new businesses, including restaurants, gas stations, movie theaters, etc..... have opened or will open within the year and I'm just speaking of businesses within a mile of my home. It's insane.
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Old 03-26-2015, 01:03 AM
 
Location: Michigan
4,571 posts, read 6,762,261 times
Reputation: 3589
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spade View Post
DC slowed down considerably. 156k moved to Houston? Wow. But chicago is the one that is surprising. Less than 10k moved there over the past year. Ouch.
More people moved into Grand Rapids than Chicago.

Detroit MSA also got revised upward by 1,000 for 2013 but only gained 1,000 over 2014. But at least it topped 2010's number by 400 people! Wooo!
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Old 03-26-2015, 01:27 AM
 
6,795 posts, read 6,616,951 times
Reputation: 5411
Quote:
Originally Posted by anonelitist View Post
AWESOME

For the 2nd year in a row, previous Census estimates were revised upward for San Francisco, and city posted strong growth.

2013 estimate revised upward from 837,442 to 841,138.
2014 estimate stands at 852,469

2010 Census was 805,235.

So the city is at record population. Density increased from 17,180 ppsm in 2010 to 18,188 ppsm in 2014. Using the same compound daily growth rate, by April 1, 2020 SF could have about 920K people and a density approaching 20K ppsm.

Of course that assumes delivery of about 35-40K new housing units between last July and early 2020 if people aren't going to continue cramming multiple to a room. Only a fraction of that will actually happen, though, and the tech sector (and biotech sector) will likely cool off for a couple years starting sometime between late next year and 2018. PwC is forecasting the cool down to begin this year. They are by far the most bearish.

I'll bet San Francisco has at least 880,000 residents by next Census and certainly at least 950,000 by 2030.

In terms of "peer" group "urban" counties:

Brooklyn added 19,420 people (0.75%)
Queens added 17,587 (0.76%)
San Francisco added 11,331 (1.35%)
Bronx added 10,482 (0.76%)
DC added 9,782 people (1.51%)
Suffolk County (Boston) added 7,161 (0.94%)
Hudson County NJ added 5,209 (0.78%)
Manhattan added 4,263 (0.26%)
Philadelphia added 4,245 (0.27%)
Cook County (Chicago) lost 179 (no change)
Baltimore lost 611 (-0.10%)

SF/SJ are growing like weeds right now relative to the other "dense-urban" cities/metros. Followed by DC, but DC has notably slowed (both in the city and in its surrounding urban counties like Fairfax, Arlington, and Alexandria).

Other urban centers are not growing that much. In New York, clearly Brooklyn and Queens are adding the population.

Chicago is still losing population it would appear. Wayne Co (Detroit) also lost pretty significant population, which was barely made up by suburban growth.

Philadelphia is in the black, but barely.


All 4 TX cities are growing like WEEDS, as are Charlotte and Raleigh. Orlando and South FL also growing like weeds while Jax and Tampa not so much. Atlanta also not really growing that fast.


The Bay Area is really putting on the population and has the only counties, for the most part, in CA that are seeing net domestic immigration as opposed to heavy net domestic emigration. For instance, SoCal grows purely by net foreign immigration which offsets the net domestic emigration.

SF MSA added 64,406 people with almost half of that in Alameda Co (Oakland's county) - 1.42% growth. Now at 4,594,060. Phoenix and Inland Empire are nipping at its heels, but SF is looking to pass Boston, as well (within ~100k).

SJ MSA added 24,171 people (1.25%).

The core 6 counties touching the Bay are right at 6.5 million people and added nearly 90,000 people last year.

Additional North Bay CSA Counties (Napa, Sonoma, and Solano Counties) added nearly 12K people and accounted for an additional 1.07 million people.

Stockton added over 10K people and accounted for 716K people. Santa Cruz accounted for 272K people.

Total CSA now over 8.6 million (113K people added)...1.33% growth.
90k is pretty good growth for Atlanta. The year before, it grew just 65k. It will be over 100k on next year's estimates. To say that's "slow" is ridiculous. Compared to it's early 2000s 180k-200k a year growth rate, yes it is, but it's higher than most metros...top 5 as far MSA in raw growth.
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Old 03-26-2015, 01:36 AM
 
6,795 posts, read 6,616,951 times
Reputation: 5411
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spade View Post
DC slowed down considerably. 156k moved to Houston? Wow. But chicago is the one that is surprising. Less than 10k moved there over the past year. Ouch.
Well, really, a lot of growth is governed by birth-death rates so 156k people really didn't move to Houston, but a lot of people still did. Chicago is probably only growing on it's birth-death rates now, but a lot of people are getting the hell out of the Chicago area. I'm sure domestic migration is high.
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Old 03-26-2015, 02:30 AM
 
1,353 posts, read 1,142,019 times
Reputation: 790
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ant131531 View Post
90k is pretty good growth for Atlanta. The year before, it grew just 65k. It will be over 100k on next year's estimates. To say that's "slow" is ridiculous. Compared to it's early 2000s 180k-200k a year growth rate, yes it is, but it's higher than most metros...top 5 as far MSA in raw growth.
I'm not trying to take a hit on Atlanta, but in my mind it's hard not to compare it to Houston, Dallas, and Phoenix. Looks like Atlanta is making a comeback, it's just been real slow, that's all.

SF + SJ (6.55 million people, less than a million people difference to Atl MSA and already built out with the country's highest housing costs) added exactly the same amount of people last year (88,577 between those 2 MSAs that are really one "metro" versus 88,891 for Atlanta).

Usually SF + SJ are typical slower growth, dense, expensive, aging areas that benefit heavily from sheer foreign immigration. They've been ramping up as of late while Atlanta's growth has been severely subdued. So in my mind, SF + SJ are growing "fast" right now while Atlanta is still growing "slowly". Dallas is slow for itself, too, but not as slow as Atlanta is right now. I'd say growth has been slower across the board for all cities except for Austin and Houston. I'd like to see Atlanta make a strong comeback to a top 10 spot.

Austin - 3.05% - 57K
Houston - 2.47% - 156K
Orlando - 2.22% - 50K
Raleigh-Durham - 2.10% - 37K
San Antonio - 2.04% - 46K
Denver - 2.02% - 55K
Las Vegas - 1.99% - 40K
Nashville - 1.94% - 34K
Phoenix - 1.93% - 85K
Dallas - 1.92% - 131K
Charlotte - 1.84% - 43K
Jacksonville - 1.65% - 23K
Atlanta - 1.61% - 89K
Seattle - 1.60% - 58K
Portland - 1.45% - 34K
Tampa - 1.44% - 41K
SF/SJ - 1.37% - 89K
Greater Salt Lake - 1.33% - 31K
Columbus - 1.30% - 26K
San Diego - 1.27% - 41K
Oklahoma City - 1.23% - 16K
Sacramento - 1.21% - 27K
South FL - 1.13% - 66K
Inland Empire - 1.18% - 52K
DC - 1.12% - 67K
Richmond - 1.06% - 13K
Grand Rapids - 1.03% - 10K
Omaha - 0.99% - 9K
Indianapolis - 0.93% - 18K
NOLA - 0.80% - 10K
Kansas City - 0.77% - 16K
Boston - 0.73% - 34K
Tulsa - 0.71% - 7K
Los Angeles - 0.66% - 86K
Tucson - 0.65% - 6K
Louisville - 0.59% - 7K
Cincinnati - 0.51% - 11K
NYC - 0.45% - 91K
Baltimore - 0.43% - 12K
Birmingham - 0.37% - 4K
Worcester - 0.26% - 2K
Philadelphia - 0.25% - 15K
El Paso - 0.25% - 2K
Providence - 0.24% - 4K
Albany - 0.19% - 2K
St. Louis - 0.16% - 5K
Albuquerque - 0.14% - 1K
Milwaukee - 0.13% - 2K
Memphis - 0.11% - 2K
Chicago - 0.10% - 10K
Detroit - 0.03% - 1K
Buffalo - 0.02% - 0
Rochester - (0.06%) - (1K)
Cleveland - (0.08%) - (2K)
Hartford - (0.14%) - (2K)
Pittsburgh - (0.19%) - (5K)
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Old 03-26-2015, 04:00 AM
 
Location: Chicago
2,358 posts, read 2,024,162 times
Reputation: 2181
Quote:
Originally Posted by anonelitist View Post
Cook County (Chicago) lost 179 (no change)

...


Chicago is still losing population it would appear.
Maybe yes, maybe no.

You'll need the city estimate to know for sure since Chicago only makes up a little more than half of Cook County. It could be a case of suburbanites moving further out into the metro, or that Chicago's marginal growth has stalled and the county has stayed roughly the same across the board.

Still glad that Chicagoland posted any growth though considering the state lost people. The city and state both have their work cut out for them moving forward.
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Old 03-26-2015, 04:22 AM
 
Location: Chicago
2,358 posts, read 2,024,162 times
Reputation: 2181
St. Louis' metro grew by 5,000, a 0.6% increase from the 2010 Census numbers. The fastest growing county was suburban St. Charles County with 5,600 people, St. Louis County remained essentially the same, and the city proper lost 1,000 people. There were also slight declines in St. Clair and Madison Counties in the Illinois suburbs.
St. Louis region barely grew in 2014 : News
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Old 03-26-2015, 06:13 AM
 
Location: The City
21,973 posts, read 30,906,597 times
Reputation: 7497
Would look like DC has passed the Philly MSA or will in the next few months

Last edited by kidphilly; 03-26-2015 at 06:31 AM..
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Old 03-26-2015, 06:15 AM
 
Location: The City
21,973 posts, read 30,906,597 times
Reputation: 7497
Quote:
Originally Posted by anonelitist View Post
AWESOME

For the 2nd year in a row, previous Census estimates were revised upward for San Francisco, and city posted strong growth.

2013 estimate revised upward from 837,442 to 841,138.
2014 estimate stands at 852,469

2010 Census was 805,235.

So the city is at record population. Density increased from 17,180 ppsm in 2010 to 18,188 ppsm in 2014. Using the same compound daily growth rate, by April 1, 2020 SF could have about 920K people and a density approaching 20K ppsm.

Of course that assumes delivery of about 35-40K new housing units between last July and early 2020 if people aren't going to continue cramming multiple to a room. Only a fraction of that will actually happen, though, and the tech sector (and biotech sector) will likely cool off for a couple years starting sometime between late next year and 2018. PwC is forecasting the cool down to begin this year. They are by far the most bearish.

I'll bet San Francisco has at least 880,000 residents by next Census and certainly at least 950,000 by 2030.

In terms of "peer" group "urban" counties:

Brooklyn added 19,420 people (0.75%)
Queens added 17,587 (0.76%)
San Francisco added 11,331 (1.35%)
Bronx added 10,482 (0.76%)
DC added 9,782 people (1.51%)
Suffolk County (Boston) added 7,161 (0.94%)
Hudson County NJ added 5,209 (0.78%)
Manhattan added 4,263 (0.26%)
Philadelphia added 4,245 (0.27%)
Cook County (Chicago) lost 179 (no change)
Baltimore lost 611 (-0.10%)

SF/SJ are growing like weeds right now relative to the other "dense-urban" cities/metros. Followed by DC, but DC has notably slowed (both in the city and in its surrounding urban counties like Fairfax, Arlington, and Alexandria).

Other urban centers are not growing that much. In New York, clearly Brooklyn and Queens are adding the population.

Chicago is still losing population it would appear. Wayne Co (Detroit) also lost pretty significant population, which was barely made up by suburban growth.

Philadelphia is in the black, but barely.


All 4 TX cities are growing like WEEDS, as are Charlotte and Raleigh. Orlando and South FL also growing like weeds while Jax and Tampa not so much. Atlanta also not really growing that fast.


The Bay Area is really putting on the population and has the only counties, for the most part, in CA that are seeing net domestic immigration as opposed to heavy net domestic emigration. For instance, SoCal grows purely by net foreign immigration which offsets the net domestic emigration.

SF MSA added 64,406 people with almost half of that in Alameda Co (Oakland's county) - 1.42% growth. Now at 4,594,060. Phoenix and Inland Empire are nipping at its heels, but SF is looking to pass Boston, as well (within ~100k).

SJ MSA added 24,171 people (1.25%).

The core 6 counties touching the Bay are right at 6.5 million people and added nearly 90,000 people last year.

Additional North Bay CSA Counties (Napa, Sonoma, and Solano Counties) added nearly 12K people and accounted for an additional 1.07 million people.

Stockton added over 10K people and accounted for 716K people. Santa Cruz accounted for 272K people.

Total CSA now over 8.6 million (113K people added)...1.33% growth.

Has been in the black for 10 years straight now after 50 straight years in the red. And now estimated over 1.56 Million (peak was over 2 million - don't think it will ever get back to that number)

Philly is growing from the core out - the inner 1/3rd is growing at a decent clip, next 1`/3rd stable and far 1/3rd declining in population. Growth in the inner 40 sq miles is off-setting losses on the periphery of the city
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