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Old 03-22-2015, 05:56 PM
 
Location: Dallas
282 posts, read 258,249 times
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Quote:
What I did notice is that poor households are booming at a very large pace in these "low tax" sunbelt havens like Houston. Much faster than their middle-class gains. Could it be the poor people fleeing expensive places? Hmmm.
Yes, much of that booming in some of these cities are being lead by poor and lower-middle income looking for cheaper living.

15 Cities Where Poverty Is Soaring - Business Insider

Charlotte has seen a 98% increase in poor households in 8 years! Ridiculous.
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Old 03-22-2015, 06:01 PM
 
Location: Tokyo, Japan
6,484 posts, read 7,753,512 times
Reputation: 7300
Quote:
Originally Posted by UAE50 View Post
Yes, much of that booming in some of these cities are being lead by poor and lower-middle income looking for cheaper living.

15 Cities Where Poverty Is Soaring - Business Insider

Charlotte has seen a 98% increase in poor households in 8 years! Ridiculous.
Crazy how a place as massive as Atlanta finished fourth. That's a ludicrous increase in poverty by rate and translates into a massive raw number.

Then again, Atlanta is in Georgia, which is a recipient state. No surprise.
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Old 03-22-2015, 07:25 PM
 
11,026 posts, read 21,633,207 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DougStark View Post
Well, how many "rich, educated types" are there in the country compared to average "joes" with average incomes? You can't argue with the fact that Texas, Arizona, Colorado and Utah are gaining population by leaps and bounds. They're all lower cost of living states with lower tax burdens than states like CA, NY, NJ or the worst IMO, Illinois.

You can thank organized labor for a part of these rust belt states' declines.

Indiana, Ohio and Wisconsin are waking up to these facts of life. No coincidence, all of these states have Republican governors.
The person you were responding to was talking about the growth of college educated workforce though. Those places you speak of are all growing fast, but that doesn't explain who the people are moving there.

The largest increases in college educated workforce from 2007 to 2012:

New York City: 747,000
Los Angeles: 418,000
Chicago: 303,000
San Francisco: 300,000
Dallas: 277,000
Philadelphia: 277,000
Washington DC: 275,000
Houston: 270,000

Places like Arizona may be growing way faster than Chicago, but Chicago gained over twice as many college educated people in that period than Phoenix.

I think that was the person's point. Places like New York, Chicago and Los Angeles are losing hundreds of thousands to internal migration, but overall they're gaining hundreds of thousands in the college educated population. That says a bit about who the people are who are leaving.

Chicago lost 178,000 to internal migration overall, but it still gained 300,000 in the college educated population. That's a huge sway in the numbers. A net loss of 478,000 non-college educated and gain of 300,000 college educated. There are a lot of sources you can look up that are researching the big changes going on in the metro, since the blended effect is pretty flat and doesn't really tell you much. Just simply looking at downtown and the gain of 65,000 jobs into the immediate downtown area....

It's a metro splitting into the haves and have-nots. Many are moving away, and many are moving into the area. It's not explicitly good or bad, there are good and bad aspects to it all, but it's more than just "everyone is running away, blah blah taxes, blah blah rust belt". The rust belt aspects of Chicago are pretty muted by 2015. They've been ripped apart for 40 years now and those industries are not a very strong engine for the regional economy like they were decades ago.

Last edited by Chicago60614; 03-22-2015 at 07:34 PM..
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Old 03-23-2015, 09:00 AM
 
Location: Brooklyn, New York
3,250 posts, read 3,497,808 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lookintomove15 View Post
So I was just looking at some migration stats from the U.S. Census Bureau. It says the biggest metro areas of NYC, LA, CHI are all losing domestic migration population.
New York had a net domestic migration loss since at least 1650s. How do you think the country is settled? People magically appear in Tucson or Columbus?
Pretty much every single person who is either white or black and who can trace their ancestry at least 100+ years to the US, had ancestors who came through the Eastern seaboard port cities at some point, from New Orleans to Portland, Maine.
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Old 03-23-2015, 12:14 PM
 
275 posts, read 298,862 times
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Well OP's stats don't say all that much.

Yes, the Sun Belt is growing quickly for a number of reasons. One, it's a lot cheaper for families. Two, they are on the receiving end of Latin American immigration. It won't be long till Latinos become the majority in a state like Texas. This is partly a geographical coincidence. It's the same reason why the East Coast cities attracted a lot of European immigrants in the 19th Century and why the West Coast cities attracted a lot of Asian immigrants in the 20th.

However using CSA data is going to lead to some poor sampling. New York's CSA (and MSA) includes Newark. Philadelphia's includes Camden. The situation in Newark is very different than it is in NYC. The cores of Philadelphia and Chicago are booming, but their peripheries are struggling.

As have others have already noted, educated people are flocking to areas like NYC and the Bay Area. They are also flocking to Sun-Belt areas like Raleigh-Durham and Austin.
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Old 03-23-2015, 02:37 PM
 
Location: Tokyo, Japan
6,484 posts, read 7,753,512 times
Reputation: 7300
Direction of Chicago proper:
Quote:
Posted on March 31, 2014 by Daniel Kay Hertz under Housing/Zoning, On Urbanism

http://danielhertz.files.wordpress.c...ggif.gif?w=750
Keep the eyes on Near North over the years in the time lapse.
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Old 03-23-2015, 07:30 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
4,648 posts, read 3,035,930 times
Reputation: 3871
Quote:
Originally Posted by Red John View Post
Crazy how a place as massive as Atlanta finished fourth. That's a ludicrous increase in poverty by rate and translates into a massive raw number.

Then again, Atlanta is in Georgia, which is a recipient state. No surprise.
Yes, a recipient state ranked at #27. We receive a whopping $1.09 for each $1.00 we send to D.C.

Oh, the horror!
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Old 03-23-2015, 08:21 PM
 
Location: First Hill, Seattle
5,498 posts, read 5,812,102 times
Reputation: 7231
Quote:
Originally Posted by UAE50 View Post
Yes, much of that booming in some of these cities are being lead by poor and lower-middle income looking for cheaper living.

15 Cities Where Poverty Is Soaring - Business Insider

Charlotte has seen a 98% increase in poor households in 8 years! Ridiculous.
Okay... Not that I necessarily disagree with the article but they wrote that Boise is in Midwest. I'm just saying.
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