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View Poll Results: What will be N. America's first car free city? (US and Canada only)
NYC 35 42.68%
Toronto 2 2.44%
Chicago 0 0%
Philadelphia 4 4.88%
Ottawa 0 0%
San Francisco 7 8.54%
Seattle 6 7.32%
Boston 6 7.32%
DC 2 2.44%
Vancouver 9 10.98%
Portland 4 4.88%
Montreal 2 2.44%
Other 5 6.10%
Voters: 82. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 03-27-2015, 02:55 PM
 
Location: Center City, Philadelphia
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Originally Posted by NOLA101 View Post
Walkscore basically sucks, though. It measures proximity to stuff, not quality of the walking environment.
lol.. right. so the ability to walk to the grocery store is less important than having to walk past a bunch of apartment buildings and dunkin donuts to take the subway to the store? There is a reason why grocery delivery is so popular in NYC.. It isn't the walkscore that hurts NYC anyway. It is the bike score where their methodology is different anyway: https://www.walkscore.com/bike-score-methodology.shtml
The yuppies in Philly care more about Bike lanes, and Bike shares more than anything else.
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Old 03-27-2015, 03:05 PM
 
9,701 posts, read 6,689,136 times
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Originally Posted by thedirtypirate View Post
lol.. right. so the ability to walk to the grocery store is less important than having to walk past a bunch of apartment buildings and dunkin donuts to take the subway to the store?
Definitely, yes. That's why suburbs of LA have high walkscores.

Dense sprawl is ranked the same in Walkscore as dense urbanity, as long as there is stuff in relative proximity, no matter how unpleasant or dangerous the walk. Irvine, CA has a high walkscore, even if there isn't a single street that is remotely pedestrian friendly. It has walkscores in line with parts of Brooklyn, even.
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Old 03-27-2015, 06:11 PM
 
1,376 posts, read 943,210 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by westboundrambler View Post
People in Portland, OR HATE cars, I drove a sprinter van delivering wine for a living, and I got so much crap from those dang hipsters and hobos. One tried to kick my van while it was moving, guess what buddy, I'm not stopping if you break your foot!
Not really true, almost everyone here seems to have a car or two and the streets are filled with cars all day. I think you're exaggerating a bit.

Last edited by CanuckInPortland; 03-27-2015 at 06:21 PM..
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Old 03-27-2015, 07:15 PM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gantz View Post
Manhattan doesn't have a lot of parking lots/garages, or even gas stations for that matter (there are less than 12 gas stations below 96th street, and they are very out of the way in industrial parts of the county). Most people literally go to another state to fill up their car. That doesn't stop the streets from having f*** ton of cars on the streets...The only way you can stop the cars from going into downtown is outright ban/congestion pricing.
I always wondered how cabs and other car-delivery services fill up in Manhattan. Are they forced to just find those 12 stations or do they leave the borough and come back? Are there a lot of cars that just run out of gas in the insane gridlock? Seems like something that would be more common with Manhattan's combo of few gas stations and really bad traffic.

I would imagine that the gas prices in Manhattan are insane - even here in LA with an abundance of gas stations around DTLA, they are almost always .50-1.00 more per gallon in the Central City than elsewhere.
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Old 03-27-2015, 07:25 PM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NOLA101 View Post
Definitely, yes. That's why suburbs of LA have high walkscores.

Dense sprawl is ranked the same in Walkscore as dense urbanity, as long as there is stuff in relative proximity, no matter how unpleasant or dangerous the walk. Irvine, CA has a high walkscore, even if there isn't a single street that is remotely pedestrian friendly. It has walkscores in line with parts of Brooklyn, even.
The most remote parts of Brooklyn? Looking at Irvine's heat map on Walkscore shows it to be pretty car-dependent.

https://www.walkscore.com/CA/Irvine

Most of LA's suburbs only have good Walkscores right around their historic cores. Take a look at adjacent Santa Ana. I know it is mostly so dense due to overcrowding, but it does have a fairly traditional historic core, and you can see it is only really walkable around that small core and a few of the commercial roads that extend out of it.

I agree that Walkscore does focus too much on proximity but I think it does a pretty good job of showing what areas have lots of things in walking distance and what areas do not. Irvine does not have a lot of things in walking distance, and I think the map makes that pretty clear.

I think one good criticism of Walkscore would come from my experience - My apartment in Hollywood was something in the 95-99 range. It was super-walkable, mainly because walking a block in any direction took you to commercial development. My current apartment in Pasadena has a much lower (but still very good) score of 86, yet in a lot of ways it feels more walkable. For one, the streets have trees other than palms, which is always nice. But it actually feels like more stores (and more functional stores, i.e. Trader Joe's, Target, Bank, Gym) are within a half mile walk, despite the lower score. I think it has a lower score because in the 0-.25 mile range it is almost purely residential in all directions except east. So I guess that is where you can see flaws.
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Old 03-28-2015, 11:43 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Western Massachusetts
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Quote:
Originally Posted by munchitup View Post
I always wondered how cabs and other car-delivery services fill up in Manhattan. Are they forced to just find those 12 stations or do they leave the borough and come back? Are there a lot of cars that just run out of gas in the insane gridlock? Seems like something that would be more common with Manhattan's combo of few gas stations and really bad traffic.

I would imagine that the gas prices in Manhattan are insane - even here in LA with an abundance of gas stations around DTLA, they are almost always .50-1.00 more per gallon in the Central City than elsewhere.
My memory is that gas prices aren't any higher, but it's a bit of a captive audience. Brooklyn's gas prices are about the same as Long Island; I've never filled up in Manhattan. This Manhattan gas station was $4.30. Gah. Gas was expensive less than a year ago:

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Old 03-29-2015, 08:52 AM
 
639 posts, read 403,013 times
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None. Not going to happen.
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Old 03-30-2015, 10:09 AM
 
Location: Brooklyn, New York
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
My memory is that gas prices aren't any higher, but it's a bit of a captive audience. Brooklyn's gas prices are about the same as Long Island; I've never filled up in Manhattan. This Manhattan gas station was $4.30. Gah. Gas was expensive less than a year ago:
Pretty sure most people just fill up in New Jersey, they have very cheap gas (one of the cheapest gas prices in the nation actually) right across the river.
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Old 03-30-2015, 10:15 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Western Massachusetts
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gantz View Post
Pretty sure most people just fill up in New Jersey, they have very cheap gas (one of the cheapest gas prices in the nation actually) right across the river.
Unless you're driving in that direction, you'd pay nearly as much in tolls to get to New Jersey. Not worth the time and savings. I can make it to NYC and back from Massachusetts on a tank of gas, though sometimes get a warning gas light. Worth it to not fill up in New York and fill up here before hand.
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Old 03-30-2015, 10:41 AM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
My memory is that gas prices aren't any higher, but it's a bit of a captive audience. Brooklyn's gas prices are about the same as Long Island; I've never filled up in Manhattan. This Manhattan gas station was $4.30. Gah. Gas was expensive less than a year ago:
I hardly drive, so I am completely unaware of what the typical gas price is down here. A couple nights ago I had the car and my wife asked me to fill it up while I was out. The only gas station I was aware of that was in close proximity was this one in Chinatown, and gas was $4.30. I thought that felt like a lot more than average, but didn't realize it until I drove through Pasadena and saw our local gas station (which is overpriced itself) was like a dollar less expensive per gallon! The gas stations that ring DTLA have to be some of the most expensive in the country.
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