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Old 03-25-2015, 06:27 PM
 
Location: Tokyo, Japan
6,479 posts, read 7,729,285 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ant131531 View Post
Houston will probably fall as well since the oil industry is cooling down. I'm surprised Seattle isn't up there since I've heard they've been getting a lot of Chinese investment.
No, it wont fall even with low oil prices. For one, 40% of the foreign real estate investment in Houston is petrochemical refining, plastics, condensed carbonate, also known as downstream, the sector of the energy business that is actually booming when crude prices fall. Google things like Japanese LNG projects in Houston, these things wont be stopping.

For the other, outside of Chicago, Dallas, and Boston no other American city comes conceivably close to matching its investment portfolio. So there aren't a lot of cities that could take its place anyhow and outside of those three, none of the other American cities even have the history with foreign investment, especially Seattle. Remember, Washington is on its way down the ladder and that is without having any segment of the government industry to capture and offset any sort of growth.
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Old 03-25-2015, 06:33 PM
 
9,591 posts, read 10,932,200 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Red John View Post
No, it wont fall even with low oil prices. For one, 40% of the foreign real estate investment in Houston is petrochemical refining, plastics, condensed carbonate, also known as downstream, the sector of the energy business that is actually booming when crude prices fall. Google things like Japanese LNG projects in Houston, these things wont be stopping.

For the other, outside of Chicago, Dallas, and Boston no other American city comes conceivably close to matching its investment portfolio. So there aren't a lot of cities that could take its place anyhow and outside of those three, none of the other American cities even have the history with foreign investment, especially Seattle. Remember, Washington is on its way down the ladder and that is without having any segment of the government industry to capture and offset any sort of growth.
What is the breakdown for foreign investment for DC? How much is residential and how much is office or hotel? Do you happen to know the breakdown?
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Old 03-25-2015, 06:42 PM
 
Location: Seattle, WA
422 posts, read 586,365 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MDAllstar View Post
You know this is mainly about office space right? DC's boom is all residential. In the grand scheme of things, the city isn't really building much in comparison to a city of 600 sq. miles. The region has nothing to do with people wanting to live in an urban environment, which in DC's case is such a concentrated area, growth will continue to be extreme because there is no other urban area outside of the 20 sq. mile core.
If I were going to channel my inner foreign real estate investor I'd say that the fact the population growth dropped last year to its slowest in 6 years, vacancies in the apartments have been rising for 3 years straight from 4.4% to 6.4% and are projected to continue to do so (to 8.8) as well as the recent drop in overall rents all are potentially problematic signs for the D.C. apartment market i.e. that it might be a bit overbuilt.

http://cfo.dc.gov/sites/default/file...ary%202015.pdf

Which explains why you're seeing articles like this recent one in the Washington Post:

For high-end apartments in the Washington area, signs of a renters market - The Washington Post
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Old 03-25-2015, 10:05 PM
 
1,024 posts, read 1,137,717 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by benleis View Post
If I were going to channel my inner foreign real estate investor I'd say that the fact the population growth dropped last year to its slowest in 6 years, vacancies in the apartments have been rising for 3 years straight from 4.4% to 6.4% and are projected to continue to do so (to 8.8) as well as the recent drop in overall rents all are potentially problematic signs for the D.C. apartment market i.e. that it might be a bit overbuilt.

http://cfo.dc.gov/sites/default/file...ary%202015.pdf

Which explains why you're seeing articles like this recent one in the Washington Post:

For high-end apartments in the Washington area, signs of a renters market - The Washington Post
That Post article was referring mostly to the suburbs, which have slowed down a lot, & i believe your statistics about vacancy rates going up were for the region as a whole as well. As far as I can tell, the District itself is doing just fine, it's the suburbs that are falling behind
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Old 03-26-2015, 06:35 AM
 
Location: The City
21,958 posts, read 30,846,027 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TyBrGr View Post
That Post article was referring mostly to the suburbs, which have slowed down a lot, & i believe your statistics about vacancy rates going up were for the region as a whole as well. As far as I can tell, the District itself is doing just fine, it's the suburbs that are falling behind
based on the census data released today 3 suburban counties out-paced DC proper in growth rates - obviously absolutes as well. DC proper is growing at a very nice clip as did the metro but there are indicators of a slowing growth rate and city vacancy rates are going up and construction has continued. Unless this dynamic changes new building starts will start to reflect this change
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Old 03-26-2015, 09:10 AM
 
Location: Willowbend/Houston
13,403 posts, read 20,312,718 times
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Glad to see Dallas so high for foreign investment.
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Old 03-26-2015, 12:32 PM
 
9,591 posts, read 10,932,200 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TyBrGr View Post
That Post article was referring mostly to the suburbs, which have slowed down a lot, & i believe your statistics about vacancy rates going up were for the region as a whole as well. As far as I can tell, the District itself is doing just fine, it's the suburbs that are falling behind

Just let these folks think what they will. Everyone in D.C. actually knows that already. LOL....

We will still walk the D.C. streets everyday enjoying ourselves in our city not caring about what the rest of the nation is doing. They need to worry about their own cities.
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Old 03-26-2015, 12:35 PM
 
9,591 posts, read 10,932,200 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TyBrGr View Post
That Post article was referring mostly to the suburbs, which have slowed down a lot, & i believe your statistics about vacancy rates going up were for the region as a whole as well. As far as I can tell, the District itself is doing just fine, it's the suburbs that are falling behind

Meanwhile.....

We see this everyday here:

Say hello to Ballpark Square near Nats Park - Washington Business Journal

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Old 03-26-2015, 04:56 PM
 
Location: Atlanta ,GA
9,086 posts, read 12,872,415 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Red John View Post
Here is private real estate + commercial real estate + industrial real estate, the overall for North America (from a different agency). It features New York, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Washington DC, Chicago, Houston, and Dallas as the top foreign investment markets.

http://www.city-data.com/forum/membe...ic117865-a.bmp
Must be all those big box chain retailers and single family houses with obese welfare recipients huh?
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Old 03-26-2015, 09:09 PM
 
1,024 posts, read 1,137,717 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MDAllstar View Post
Yeah I saw something crazy like over 10 different high rises are going to start construction this year in the Capitol Riverfront neighborhood alone... it's bizarre
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