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Old 04-09-2015, 03:29 PM
 
11,026 posts, read 21,622,669 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PerseusVeil View Post
"Chicago's growth has virtually stalled. Over the last year, the metropolitan area added only 0.1% to its population. This is less than one quarter the longer-term rate that had previously been projected. At that rate, Chicago would have reached 10 million residents within a decade. At the most recent growth rate, it would take nearly a half century. In light of the expected slower growth rates in the future, Chicago may never reach megacity status, unless its commuting shed expands enough to add new counties along its metropolitan fringe.

However, even without Chicago, the United States could add two new megacities within the next two decades. Both Houston and Dallas-Fort Worth would exceed 10 million by 2040 population if their current growth rates were to be maintained."


Ouch.
They're projecting long term growth factors based off a one year performance benchmark. That makes perfect sense
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Old 04-09-2015, 03:37 PM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
18,255 posts, read 25,980,749 times
Reputation: 9018
Quote:
Originally Posted by PerseusVeil View Post
"Chicago's growth has virtually stalled. Over the last year, the metropolitan area added only 0.1% to its population. This is less than one quarter the longer-term rate that had previously been projected. At that rate, Chicago would have reached 10 million residents within a decade. At the most recent growth rate, it would take nearly a half century. In light of the expected slower growth rates in the future, Chicago may never reach megacity status, unless its commuting shed expands enough to add new counties along its metropolitan fringe.

However, even without Chicago, the United States could add two new megacities within the next two decades. Both Houston and Dallas-Fort Worth would exceed 10 million by 2040 population if their current growth rates were to be maintained."


Ouch.
The DC/Bmore CSA is going to pass it Chicagoland. Which kind of shows how laughable CSA's are for some regions lol.
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Old 04-09-2015, 04:02 PM
 
Location: Chicago
2,358 posts, read 2,022,336 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chicago60614 View Post
They're projecting long term growth factors based off a one year performance benchmark. That makes perfect sense
True, but it's still a kick in the shin nonetheless.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Spade View Post
The DC/Bmore CSA is going to pass it Chicagoland. Which kind of shows how laughable CSA's are for some regions lol.
They were looking at MSAs, but the Washington CSA possibly passing the Chicago CSA in a couple of decades (or less) is less shocking than both Dallas' and Houston's MSAs possibly passing Chicago's in a couple of decades.
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Old 04-09-2015, 04:05 PM
 
Location: Tokyo, Japan
6,484 posts, read 7,749,801 times
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Good for Chicago I guess.
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Old 04-09-2015, 04:51 PM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
18,255 posts, read 25,980,749 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PerseusVeil View Post
True, but it's still a kick in the shin nonetheless.



They were looking at MSAs, but the Washington CSA possibly passing the Chicago CSA in a couple of decades (or less) is less shocking than both Dallas' and Houston's MSAs possibly passing Chicago's in a couple of decades.
Oh I see.
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Old 04-09-2015, 06:35 PM
 
178 posts, read 243,464 times
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Whatever happened to Las Vegas? It was the fastest growing city up until about 10 years ago.

State still fastest growing - Las Vegas Sun News
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Old 04-09-2015, 09:56 PM
 
Location: That star on your map in the middle of the East Coast, DMV
3,498 posts, read 3,028,220 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Spade View Post
The DC/Bmore CSA is going to pass it Chicagoland. Which kind of shows how laughable CSA's are for some regions lol.
How is that laughable when DC/Bmore CSA before they expanded again this decade was already approaching 9 million in like 8000+ sq miles? Chicagoland is close to 12,000 sq mi ain't it?
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Old 04-09-2015, 10:07 PM
 
Location: Maryland
3,936 posts, read 5,066,874 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the resident09 View Post
How is that laughable when DC/Bmore CSA before they expanded again this decade was already approaching 9 million in like 8000+ sq miles? Chicagoland is close to 12,000 sq mi ain't it?
Chicagoland puts 8.6 million in less than 2500 sq mi:

List of United States urban areas - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 04-09-2015, 10:09 PM
 
283 posts, read 331,279 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lookintomove15 View Post
Whatever happened to Las Vegas? It was the fastest growing city up until about 10 years ago.

State still fastest growing - Las Vegas Sun News
I think it's crazy how little Las Vegas is talked about on here, considering it's a 2 million person metro - much smaller ones get a lot more attention on here. I think the recession really took it out of the national spotlight. People could longer afford vacation to Vegas, and it's economy practically haulted in growth, and apparently population ever since. I'd bet that the lack of water out west really deters people away now too, not to mention that people are often wiser in spending there money now, so I bet tourism to Vegas will never go back to pre-recession levels.
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Old 04-09-2015, 10:18 PM
 
Location: That star on your map in the middle of the East Coast, DMV
3,498 posts, read 3,028,220 times
Reputation: 1976
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maintainschaos View Post
Chicagoland puts 8.6 million in less than 2500 sq mi:

List of United States urban areas - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
These urban area estimates are some of the most inaccurate for "dual city" metro's like DC-Bmore, either way it doesn't take close to 8000 sq mi to get to 8+ million here either.
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