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View Poll Results: Georgia, more in common with Alabama or North Carolina?
Alabama 141 62.67%
North Carolina 84 37.33%
Voters: 225. You may not vote on this poll

 
 
Old 03-26-2015, 11:21 PM
 
Location: Atlanta ,GA
9,086 posts, read 12,861,080 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
Actually both are similarly split between Appalachia, the Piedmont, and the coastal plain, but the bulk of their populations are in the Piedmont region.
True.But Georgia's coastal plain and Alabama's Gulf make them more different than pairing it with NC.

N.C. and Georgia share the exact same regions.AL and GA share SOME of the regions.


I don't really see how Alabama's identity is largely from the Gulf. Alabama's coast is pretty small to begin with; I think places in central Alabama like Birmingham, Montgomery, Tuscaloosa, Auburn, etc. contribute to Alabama's identity in a big way (Civil Rights, college football, etc.).

When I think of Alabama I think the Gulf nore than I do the Piedmont,I believe because truthfully its the only part of the state that many Georgians are interested in due to the coastal areas.
Sorry but I never hear anybody wanting to vacation in Birmingham or Huntsville.





I think colonial history is a bigger factor for GA than NC, but beyond that, I think it could go either way. I think Savannah and Mobile have more similarities than Savannah and Wilmington, and Atlanta and Birmingham were pretty similar historically. And although Georgia doesn't touch the Gulf, the coastal plain area of the state in the south is split between the Atlantic coastal plain and the Gulf coastal plain which is pretty interesting.
Mobile has the French roots.Even the oldest Mardi Gras.
Savannah/Brunswick are profoundly English.
The coast of Georgia has the rich culture of the African slaves that lived along the coast of The Carolinas and Georgia.
The traditions are a little more pronounced and connected to that African heritage.
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Old 03-26-2015, 11:35 PM
 
27,749 posts, read 24,763,128 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by afonega1 View Post
True.But Georgia's coastal plain and Alabama's Gulf make them more different than pairing it with NC.

N.C. and Georgia share the exact same regions.AL and GA share SOME of the regions.
Actually, Georgia is halfway, so to speak, between Alabama and NC when it comes to geographic regions because Georgia's coastal plain is split between the Atlantic and the Gulf. Alabama and Georgia look like mirror images of each other geographically.



Quote:
When I think of Alabama I think the Gulf nore than I do the Piedmont,I believe because truthfully its the only part of the state that many Georgians are interested in due to the coastal areas.
Sorry but I never hear anybody wanting to vacation in Birmingham or Huntsville.
You mentioned identity; in the national consciousness, Alabama's identity mainly revolves around things like its role in the Civil Rights movement and college football. The cities that are largely associated with those things are in the central part of the state. The coast is nice, but I don't think it's big enough to contribute significantly to a national identity, plus it's overshadowed by Florida's Gulf Coast and even New Orleans.

Quote:
Mobile has the French roots.Even the oldest Mardi Gras.
Savannah/Brunswick are profoundly English.
The coast of Georgia has the rich culture of the African slaves that lived along the coast of The Carolinas and Georgia.
The traditions are a little more pronounced and connected to that African heritage.
I get that, but Savannah and Mobile are closer in terms of size, industries, etc. Both are known for their history, have a big "ethnic" signature event each year (St. Patty's Day, Mardi Gras), have busy ports, etc.
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Old 03-26-2015, 11:58 PM
 
Location: Atlanta ,GA
9,086 posts, read 12,861,080 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
Actually, Georgia is halfway, so to speak, between Alabama and NC when it comes to geographic regions because Georgia's coastal plain is split between the Atlantic and the Gulf. Alabama and Georgia look like mirror images of each other geographically.





You mentioned identity; in the national consciousness, Alabama's identity mainly revolves around things like its role in the Civil Rights movement and college football. The cities that are largely associated with those things are in the central part of the state. The coast is nice, but I don't think it's big enough to contribute significantly to a national identity, plus it's overshadowed by Florida's Gulf Coast and even New Orleans.



I get that, but Savannah and Mobile are closer in terms of size, industries, etc. Both are known for their history, have a big "ethnic" signature event each year (St. Patty's Day, Mardi Gras), have busy ports, etc.
Well I THINK I had heard of the Tidewater region however that goes to show you that culturally its pretty insignificant in most peoples mind.My opinion of course but im sure if I asked people I knew where the Piedmont,Appalacians and Gulf Regions were they are more likely to know by far than where the Tidewater Region is.

Another big thing in my opinion is Georgia's ties to military.Georgia and NC both have some of the biggest most important military bases in the U.S.Miltary cities bring in a different vibe to an area,In many ways makes it more than average Southern town.
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Old 03-27-2015, 05:54 AM
 
27,749 posts, read 24,763,128 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by afonega1 View Post
Well I THINK I had heard of the Tidewater region however that goes to show you that culturally its pretty insignificant in most peoples mind.My opinion of course but im sure if I asked people I knew where the Piedmont,Appalacians and Gulf Regions were they are more likely to know by far than where the Tidewater Region is.
Fair point. NC has the Tidewater region, Georgia has the Lowcountry, Alabama has the Gulf Coast. They all have their distinctives along at least a portion of their coastal areas.

Quote:
Another big thing in my opinion is Georgia's ties to military.Georgia and NC both have some of the biggest most important military bases in the U.S.Miltary cities bring in a different vibe to an area,In many ways makes it more than average Southern town.
This is true; NC has Fayetteville and Jacksonville while Georgia has Columbus, Augusta, Warner Robbins, and bases near and along the coast. I don't think Alabama really has anything comparable.
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Old 03-27-2015, 08:54 AM
 
Location: Metro Atlanta, GA
444 posts, read 781,267 times
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Geographically, GA is similar to both NC and AL. Demographically, politically, and economically, GA is more similar to NC than AL, hands down!!!

In the present day scheme of things, there are more differences, than similarities between GA and AL!!
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Old 03-27-2015, 11:33 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
27,611 posts, read 24,802,203 times
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I voted Alabama.

Politically, Georgia is not really similar to either though I would say Georgia outside of metro Atlanta is more similar to Alabama. Georgia, as a whole, doesn't vote any differently from South Carolina despite having a moderate metro of 5.5 million people.

Alabama and Georgia both have two of the highest Black percentages in the U.S. and both were historically part of the Cotton Belt. North Carolina was never as Black as Georgia or Alabama and had a more tobacco and timber oriented agricultural economy than a cotton one.
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Old 03-27-2015, 11:42 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
27,611 posts, read 24,802,203 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by afonega1 View Post
Mobile has the French roots.Even the oldest Mardi Gras.
Savannah/Brunswick are profoundly English.
The coast of Georgia has the rich culture of the African slaves that lived along the coast of The Carolinas and Georgia.
The traditions are a little more pronounced and connected to that African heritage.
Yeah, but that's such a small piece of Alabama culture. In terms of the actual population of French descent, Mississippi is more "French" than Alabama, yet people still associate Mississippi more with English/Scots-Irish descended Whites. I would say Birmingham, Montgomery, Huntsville and Tuscaloosa are more representative of AL than Mobile.
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Old 03-27-2015, 02:51 PM
 
Location: The canyon (with my pistols and knife)
12,994 posts, read 17,122,083 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 80s_kid View Post
I honestly think that GA is more like a larger SC with all of NC's urban areas combined and put into the center north of the state. Like Afonega1, I think GA and NC share more history wise. AL is a Gulf state.
I've discussed elsewhere that Georgia is a hybrid of South Carolina and Alabama with a big city in the middle. In the "colonial" part of Georgia, which is everything east of the Chattahoochee and Ocmulgee Rivers, Georgia is more like South Carolina. This includes cities like Toccoa, Athens, Augusta, Milledgeville, Dublin, Statesboro and Savannah. West of those rivers, it's more like Alabama. This includes cities like Rome, LaGrange, Columbus, Americus and Albany. Gainesville, Atlanta and Macon happen to be located right on the boundary between colonial Georgia and the remainder.

Elsewhere, the Blue Ridge Mountains region is more like western North Carolina, and the southernmost part of the state is more like northern Florida. To be specific, cities like Tifton, Thomasville and Valdosta are more like the Gulf coastal plain of Florida, and cities like Douglas, Waycross and Brunswick are more like the Atlantic coastal plain of Florida.
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Old 03-27-2015, 03:37 PM
 
Location: Augusta GA
880 posts, read 2,468,059 times
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Alabama. A good chunk of the southern half of GA is much more Deep South than anything in NC (not saying some areas like Lumberton don't have a Deep South vibe, but not on the level of places like Appling and Bacon counties in GA, which might as well be in rural Mississippi). Heck, even some of the outer suburbs of metro Atlanta are that way (I'm looking at you southern Fayette county)!
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Old 03-28-2015, 05:59 AM
 
Location: Closer than you think!
2,103 posts, read 3,165,816 times
Reputation: 1529
North Carolina for: GDP, Population, growth rate, education institutional ranking, transient state, coastal

Alabama for: southern landscape, state layout, larger black population

Both for: culture, dialet, food...

Really, Georgia is probably the most unique state in the south. You have an area that feels like you're in NOVA ( metro Atlanta north in particular) with the rest of the state giving off a South Carolina type vibe IMO. Night and day...
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