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View Poll Results: Georgia, more in common with Alabama or North Carolina?
Alabama 141 62.67%
North Carolina 84 37.33%
Voters: 225. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 02-11-2016, 07:10 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
27,623 posts, read 24,832,767 times
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Non-Hispanic White for Obama by State in 2012

Florida - 38.3%
Virginia - 37.3%
West Virginia - 32.8%
Kentucky - 31.5%
Tennessee - 30.8%
North Carolina - 30.6%
Arkansas - 27.4%
Oklahoma - 27.1%
South Carolina - 23.4%
Georgia -19.6%
Texas - 19.6%
Alabama - 15.8%
Louisiana - 14.4%
Mississippi - 11.4%

http://www.whitdem.org/2012WHITEVOTE.png

Georgia is tied with Texas for 4th lowest in the South. Of course, 4th lowest in the South also means 4th lowest in the United States since the South has shown more resistance to Obama than any other region of the country.

Correction: Georgia is tied for 5th lowest with Texas. Utah just edged them out at 18.3%.

Last edited by BajanYankee; 02-11-2016 at 07:36 PM..
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Old 02-11-2016, 07:26 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
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Here's something interesting. This is the number and percentage of people in each state born in the Midwest, Northeast or West.

Florida - 5,955,048 (30.8%)
North Carolina - 1,826,905 (18.7%)
Virginia - 1,702,258 (20.8%)
Georgia - 1,624,507 (16.4%)
Tennessee - 1,039,398 (16.1%)
South Carolina - 842,761 (17.8%)
Alabama - 473,048 (9.8%)
Mississippi - 248,985 (8.3%)

The conventional C-D wisdom says that boatloads of transplants should make a state more liberal. That's possibly true. Georgia may be even more conservative if it weren't for Noo Yawkas moving down there. But apparently there aren't enough of them moving there (at least not the White ones anyway) to counterbalance its strong right-leaning tendencies.
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Old 02-12-2016, 04:41 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nortonguy View Post
I find it very difficult to believe the white people in rural GA are more hardcore republican than rural SC.
Counties where Obama registered the least White support in 2012.

Georgia

Pike - 5.0%
Walton - 5.0%
Glascock - 6.0%
Schley - 6.0%
Bacon - 7.0%
Bleckley - 8.0%
Butts - 8.0%
Charlton - 8.0%
Laurens - 8.0%
Wilcox - 8.0%

South Carolina

Edgefield - 13.0%
Aiken - 15%
Florence - 16.0%
Greenwood - 17.0%
Lexington - 17%
Saluda - 17%
Anderson - 18.0%
Pickens - 18.0%
Barnwell - 19.0%
Cherokee - 19.0%

http://www.whitdem.org/2012WhiteVote.html

Georgia's rural counties actually voted more Republican than Alabama's rural counties. The difference obviously is that Atlanta offsets a lot of the rural vote. Obama, for example, won 55% of the White vote in Dekalb County.

The map for South Carolina looks a lot different from Georgia. It looks a lot like North Carolina minus the liberal enclaves such as Buncombe and Durham Counties. Obama ended up winning 35% of the White vote in Orangeburg County, which is largely rural. I'll let Mutiny77 explain that one.
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Old 02-12-2016, 07:57 AM
 
27,785 posts, read 24,814,471 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
Counties where Obama registered the least White support in 2012.

Georgia

Pike - 5.0%
Walton - 5.0%
Glascock - 6.0%
Schley - 6.0%
Bacon - 7.0%
Bleckley - 8.0%
Butts - 8.0%
Charlton - 8.0%
Laurens - 8.0%
Wilcox - 8.0%

South Carolina

Edgefield - 13.0%
Aiken - 15%
Florence - 16.0%
Greenwood - 17.0%
Lexington - 17%
Saluda - 17%
Anderson - 18.0%
Pickens - 18.0%
Barnwell - 19.0%
Cherokee - 19.0%

http://www.whitdem.org/2012WhiteVote.html

Georgia's rural counties actually voted more Republican than Alabama's rural counties. The difference obviously is that Atlanta offsets a lot of the rural vote. Obama, for example, won 55% of the White vote in Dekalb County.

The map for South Carolina looks a lot different from Georgia. It looks a lot like North Carolina minus the liberal enclaves such as Buncombe and Durham Counties. Obama ended up winning 35% of the White vote in Orangeburg County, which is largely rural. I'll let Mutiny77 explain that one.
LOL, I'm actually a little surprised it was that high.

But I'm not surprised that Edgefield County had the least percentage of Whites voting for Obama; that is where Benjamin "Pitchfork" Tillman is from. He's pretty much the architect of Southern racial politics.
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Old 02-12-2016, 08:11 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
LOL, I'm actually a little surprised it was that high.
Me too. But the math checks out. Obama won 71.4% of the vote in Orangeburg County. Non-Hispanic Whites make up 34% of the population there. Assuming that Blacks made up a little less of the electorate relative to their numbers in the general population (this is true across America), and assuming Obama is winning between 92-95% of the Black vote, then the non-Hispanic White vote share makes sense. Still surprising though.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
But I'm not surprised that Edgefield County had the least percentage of Whites voting for Obama; that is where Benjamin "Pitchfork" Tillman is from. He's pretty much the architect of Southern racial politics.
That's also where good ole' Strom was from.

Most people would probably expect South Carolina to look more like Alabama. It's undoubtedly a conservative state but the differences between it and Alabama/Georgia/Mississippi are striking. This is true even in rural counties like Darlington and Dillon that haven't exactly seen a deluge of Northeastern transplants.

It's also interesting that many of the counties with the largest Black population register some of the highest Obama support among non-Hispanic Whites.

Last edited by BajanYankee; 02-12-2016 at 08:29 AM..
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Old 02-12-2016, 09:07 AM
 
52,713 posts, read 75,602,776 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
Me too. But the math checks out. Obama won 71.4% of the vote in Orangeburg County. Non-Hispanic Whites make up 34% of the population there. Assuming that Blacks made up a little less of the electorate relative to their numbers in the general population (this is true across America), and assuming Obama is winning between 92-95% of the Black vote, then the non-Hispanic White vote share makes sense. Still surprising though.



That's also where good ole' Strom was from.

Most people would probably expect South Carolina to look more like Alabama. It's undoubtedly a conservative state but the differences between it and Alabama/Georgia/Mississippi are striking. This is true even in rural counties like Darlington and Dillon that haven't exactly seen a deluge of Northeastern transplants.

It's also interesting that many of the counties with the largest Black population register some of the highest Obama support among non-Hispanic Whites.
My mother is from Marion County originally(Mullins) and I kind of understand this, as it seems like things were a little bit different where she was from versus where my dad was from in Mississippi(Holmes County). For instance, I think Black people owned more land in comparison, as my great great grandfather actually owned land, which was taken from him, but he got it back somehow(supposedly a great great aunt said that the guys that took it from him died not long after and she ended up building her home on that land when she moved back from NJ). So, I think that parts of SC had areas where Black people had a little bit more pull than say other places.

My mom did say that Horry County, the next county over and where Myrtle Beach is located, was a KKK stronghold. Hence, the reason why Atlantic Beach is where Black people went for the beach experience in that area during segregation and is why the "Black Bike Week" is officially called the Atlantic Beach Bike Week.
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Old 02-12-2016, 09:13 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
27,623 posts, read 24,832,767 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
My mother is from Marion County originally(Mullins) and I kind of understand this, as it seems like things were a little bit different where she was from versus where my dad was from in Mississippi(Holmes County). For instance, I think Black people owned more land in comparison, as my great great grandfather actually owned land, which was taken from him, but he got it back somehow(supposedly a great great aunt said that the guys that took it from him died not long after and she ended up building her home on that land when she moved back from NJ). So, I think that parts of SC had areas where Black people had a little bit more pull than say other places.

My mom did say that Horry County, the next county over and where Myrtle Beach is located, was a KKK stronghold. Hence, the reason why Atlantic Beach is where Black people went for the beach experience in that area during segregation and is why the "Black Bike Week" is officially called the Atlantic Beach Bike Week.
So that means you've had chicken bog?
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Old 02-12-2016, 09:35 AM
 
27,785 posts, read 24,814,471 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
Most people would probably expect South Carolina to look more like Alabama. It's undoubtedly a conservative state but the differences between it and Alabama/Georgia/Mississippi are striking. This is true even in rural counties like Darlington and Dillon that haven't exactly seen a deluge of Northeastern transplants.

It's also interesting that many of the counties with the largest Black population register some of the highest Obama support among non-Hispanic Whites.
Yeah I have to agree. For instance, during the Civil Rights era, while SC wasn't anything close to an example of progress or tolerance--it did raise the Confederate flag over the Statehouse and produced staunch segregationist Strom Thurmond after all--it wasn't really known for high-profile incidents like violent protests or assassinations. I think the most publicized incident during that time was the Orangeburg Massacre, which not many people know about.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
My mother is from Marion County originally(Mullins) and I kind of understand this, as it seems like things were a little bit different where she was from versus where my dad was from in Mississippi(Holmes County). For instance, I think Black people owned more land in comparison, as my great great grandfather actually owned land, which was taken from him, but he got it back somehow(supposedly a great great aunt said that the guys that took it from him died not long after and she ended up building her home on that land when she moved back from NJ). So, I think that parts of SC had areas where Black people had a little bit more pull than say other places.
Yep. Back in my hometown, my parents live on land that was bequeathed to us by my great-grandmother; we are surrounded by relatives (my grandmother, great-aunts, cousins, etc.) who all live/lived on that land.
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Old 02-12-2016, 09:56 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
27,623 posts, read 24,832,767 times
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Mutiny, did you know Nicole Beharie? She's from your hometown. I like when her Southern accent slips out and she says "Craaaayne."


http://cdn.hitfix.com/photos/5824565..._top_story.jpg

Another beauty from your neck of the woods is Teyonah Parris.


http://static1.squarespace.com/stati...pg?format=750w
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Old 02-12-2016, 10:20 AM
 
27,785 posts, read 24,814,471 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
Mutiny, did you know Nicole Beharie? She's from your hometown. I like when her Southern accent slips out and she says "Craaaayne."


http://cdn.hitfix.com/photos/5824565..._top_story.jpg

Another beauty from your neck of the woods is Teyonah Parris.


http://static1.squarespace.com/stati...pg?format=750w
No, had no idea. The most poppin' actress originally from my neck of the woods these days is Viola Davis, originally from St. Matthews which is immediately north of Orangeburg.

The Orangeburg area is mostly known for producing athletes, particularly in football. I have a 3rd or 4th cousin who plays in the NFL.
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