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View Poll Results: What city is most poised to become another powerhouse of the South
Richmond, Va 27 9.96%
New Orleans, LA 24 8.86%
Nashville, TN 107 39.48%
Jacksonville, FL 14 5.17%
Louisville, KY 10 3.69%
Raleigh, NC 71 26.20%
Birmingham, AL 16 5.90%
Memphis, TN 2 0.74%
Voters: 271. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 04-27-2015, 08:44 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by goofy328 View Post
Richmond has a long way to go. It is not even as great as some other state capitals. It has potential, but given that it is the state capital it should change the laws and annex everything around it, like Columbus, OH did, and reach out and touch Hampton Roads. Then we may have something to talk about.
Are you saying that Richmond's city limits should stretch all the way to Hampton Roads???? Why???

Quote:
All the real growth in Virginia is out in Hampton Roads and Northern Virginia.
NOVA, yes. Hampton Roads, not at all. Richmond is growing faster than Hampton Roads both in terms of percentage and raw numbers.

Quote:
IMHO I think that Richmond is too conservative and too stuck in the past to become a cultural hub in the way that other areas in the state are moving in the direction of becoming. Not to say that Richmond doesn't have anything to offer but it is a very small town in comparison to other cities in the South that are doing things.
What other areas in the state are moving in the direction of becoming cultural hubs? NOVA already is due to being part of the DC metro area and I don't hear of Hampton Roads or Roanoke evolving into such. There may be an argument for Charlottesville since it's the home of UVA, but that's about it. But I don't see Richmond as a "very small town" compared to other Southern cities growing and developing; if anything I think it has managed to balance population and economic growth pretty well.
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Old 04-27-2015, 08:49 PM
 
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Originally Posted by JayJayCB View Post
It just seems a little strange that other states in the area like North Carolina and Georgia are booming, while Virginia seems to be falling behind as time goes by.
You do realize that a state doesn't have to experience breakneck growth in order to do well for itself, right? Despite not experiencing such growth, it has managed to keep pace with GA and NC in a number of areas. Much like Richmond itself, I think the state of VA has balanced population and economic growth quite well.
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Old 04-27-2015, 09:26 PM
 
Location: Norfolk, VA
5,633 posts, read 5,409,054 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
Are you saying that Richmond's city limits should stretch all the way to Hampton Roads???? Why???



NOVA, yes. Hampton Roads, not at all. Richmond is growing faster than Hampton Roads both in terms of percentage and raw numbers.



What other areas in the state are moving in the direction of becoming cultural hubs? NOVA already is due to being part of the DC metro area and I don't hear of Hampton Roads or Roanoke evolving into such. There may be an argument for Charlottesville since it's the home of UVA, but that's about it. But I don't see Richmond as a "very small town" compared to other Southern cities growing and developing; if anything I think it has managed to balance population and economic growth pretty well.
Because it is bound to happen. With the growth occurring as it is in Virgina Richmond and Hampton Roads will eventually become one mega region.

If either area continues to grow it is a matter of when, not if.
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Old 04-27-2015, 10:49 PM
 
27,941 posts, read 24,985,133 times
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Originally Posted by goofy328 View Post
Because it is bound to happen. With the growth occurring as it is in Virgina Richmond and Hampton Roads will eventually become one mega region.

If either area continues to grow it is a matter of when, not if.
But you were talking about city limits; to have Richmond's municipal boundaries touch Hampton Roads would be impossible, even if it were the size of Jacksonville, FL. As far as metro areas go, that has nothing do with cities; the criteria for such is determined by the OMB. And why would you want bland, soulless sprawl stretching all the way between Greater Richmond and Hampton Roads anyway? That would be a horrible thing.
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Old 04-27-2015, 10:58 PM
 
Location: Norfolk, VA
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Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
But you were talking about city limits; to have Richmond's municipal boundaries touch Hampton Roads would be impossible, even if it were the size of Jacksonville, FL. As far as metro areas go, that has nothing do with cities; the criteria for such is determined by the OMB. And why would you want bland, soulless sprawl stretching all the way between Greater Richmond and Hampton Roads anyway? That would be a horrible thing.
I don't want it I just think its inevitable. But I've been through it before its not the worst thing in the world, just part of city life. I do like what Richmond is doing with their transportation infrastructure. They appear to be able to get things done. I don't see anything of interest happening on that front in Hampton Roads anytime soon.

We're supposed to see light rail growth throughout Virginia Beach but I'll believe it when I see it. Too many damn studies. Too many public hearings. Just do it and shut up about it already. Virginia Beach has been in talks for light rail for what, like five years? They're either going to do it or they're not.
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Old 04-27-2015, 11:26 PM
 
6,612 posts, read 6,576,666 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by goofy328 View Post
I don't want it I just think its inevitable. But I've been through it before its not the worst thing in the world, just part of city life. I do like what Richmond is doing with their transportation infrastructure. They appear to be able to get things done. I don't see anything of interest happening on that front in Hampton Roads anytime soon.

We're supposed to see light rail growth throughout Virginia Beach but I'll believe it when I see it. Too many damn studies. Too many public hearings. Just do it and shut up about it already. Virginia Beach has been in talks for light rail for what, like five years? They're either going to do it or they're not.
Rail transit takes many years to build anywhere...I'm sure VA Beach is no different. The studies are necessary and can't be skipped over. And there is always an element of opposition no matter where it is being built, so that slows it down too.
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Old 04-28-2015, 03:48 PM
 
Location: Miami-Jax
5,835 posts, read 6,397,323 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by goofy328 View Post
We're supposed to see light rail growth throughout Virginia Beach but I'll believe it when I see it. Too many damn studies. Too many public hearings. Just do it and shut up about it already. Virginia Beach has been in talks for light rail for what, like five years? They're either going to do it or they're not.
hahaha. Most of the cities building out transit infrastructure have been discussing and negotiating it for 2-3 decades.
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Old 04-28-2015, 04:00 PM
 
Location: Norfolk, VA
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Originally Posted by projectmaximus View Post
hahaha. Most of the cities building out transit infrastructure have been discussing and negotiating it for 2-3 decades.
It feels like 2 to 3 decades the way they bring it up every few months and talk about it in the newspaper. But I see your point.
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Old 04-28-2015, 08:42 PM
 
Location: Raleigh, NC
1,099 posts, read 1,036,410 times
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Honestly, the light rail construction is included in the budget that's going to be voted on in a couple weeks. If that budget passes, we'll be getting light rail.

McCaullife seems to think that a lot of businesses are hinting at moving into the area if light rail goes through.
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Old 04-28-2015, 09:43 PM
AT9
 
Location: Midwest City, Oklahoma
691 posts, read 1,010,623 times
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Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
I consider NOLA a Gulf Coast hub due to its outsize cultural profile and relative isolation. Besides partying and debauchery, it also has a convention and tourism industry that can go toe-to-toe with the "big boys" of the South (Atlanta, Houston, Dallas, Miami) and a decent higher ed scene.
NOLA definitely is a Gulf Coast hub, just probably not a current "southern" hub...it's one of three in my opinion (Houston, NOLA, and Tampa). NOLA isn't nearly as large as Tampa or especially Houston, but its history and industrial presence (meaning the general delta region) makes it the cultural, historic, and economic hub between Lafayette, LA to Pensacola, about 300 miles.

This is a fairly large region when you count all the small to mid-sized regions:
Baton Rouge: 800K
NOLA: 1.2 million
Gulfport/Biloxi: 250K
Lafayette: 275K
Mobile: 600K
Pensacola: 450K

Total: 3.575 million.

Also, going forward and thinking about the concept of "mega regions," I think it'll be an interesting question of which region becomes the most dominant hub. I think there will be three competing regions/corridors in the South: "Charlanta" (the I-85 corridor from Atlanta through Greeneville/Spartanburg to the NC Piedmont Crescent consisting of Charlotte, the Triad, and the Triangle), the "Texas Triangle" (DFW, Houston, San Antonio, Austin), and the Florida peninsula generally.

Florida might be under water by the time these regions have really developed over the next few decades. Ironically, those other regions could be hurting for water in the future.
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