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View Poll Results: What city is most poised to become another powerhouse of the South
Richmond, Va 27 9.96%
New Orleans, LA 24 8.86%
Nashville, TN 107 39.48%
Jacksonville, FL 14 5.17%
Louisville, KY 10 3.69%
Raleigh, NC 71 26.20%
Birmingham, AL 16 5.90%
Memphis, TN 2 0.74%
Voters: 271. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 05-11-2015, 12:03 AM
 
Location: New Orleans, LA
1,291 posts, read 1,188,321 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JMatl View Post
We have seen more Californians since the end of the recession than we ever have.
So have we...

and wish they'd go back because real estate is insane atm. Except the movie stars, we like the movie stars.
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Old 05-11-2015, 12:07 AM
 
Location: Atlanta
5,170 posts, read 3,450,736 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mwahfromtheheart View Post
So have we...

and wish they'd go back because real estate is insane atm. Except the movie stars, we like the movie stars.
LOL! You can't have it both ways, Mwah.

When people pay cash for the asking price or more, what do you do? You accommodate and welcome them.

And we make $$$ off of and befriend them. Our best friends also happen to live in L.A., so we 'get it.'
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Old 05-11-2015, 01:31 AM
 
Location: New Orleans, LA
1,291 posts, read 1,188,321 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JMatl View Post
LOL! You can't have it both ways, Mwah.

When people pay cash for the asking price or more, what do you do? You accommodate and welcome them.

And we make $$$ off of and befriend them. Our best friends also happen to live in L.A., so we 'get it.'
Yeah, til my rent goes up $100 in 2 years and I'm looking for a house and can't find one that I won't get shot in for under 200k.

The movie stars are awesome but we don't have the housing stock for the people that are here anymore. Besides, Brad Pitt and Jay-Z are just a few celebrities. The ones driving up the prices are the people with large sums of money from the coasts (Hollywood talent ... hairdressers etc). Come on to visit but jesus we gotta live here too ya know ... Unfortunately a lot of transplants are coming because CA and NYC are a fortune to live in...

ATL has room to grow, NOLA doesn't. We have to drain swamp to build another subdivision.
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Old 05-11-2015, 08:01 PM
 
Location: Nashville, TN
4,966 posts, read 4,028,243 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BayAreaDave View Post
As soon as Nashville starts making some changes to its Transportation system I think it will automatically become a Hub. The street activity and urban feel that a good public transportation system brings will change the city almost overnight. Too bad the amp did not get built, it was not perfect but it was a great start.
Transportation is a big issue for Nashville. I have mixed feelings about AMP, however, I think Nashville needs something more substantial such as light rail. There is still plenty of room to develop a good system, as Nashville is not very dense, even in the core area (this is changing fast though). Something similar to Charlotte's Lynx would be ideal especially connecting hot growth areas. The problem is of course, convincing leadership to accept funding, the population that sitting in traffic several hours a day is not feasible, that it's SAFE and not just for low income ethnic groups, and lastly, that business will pass Nashville over without an effective way of moving people. They are adding more lanes to the interstates, but that, alone, will not be enough for a fast growing metro like Nashville.
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Old 05-11-2015, 09:17 PM
 
Location: Miami-Jax
6,275 posts, read 6,917,692 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shakeesha View Post
Transportation is a big issue for Nashville. I have mixed feelings about AMP, however, I think Nashville needs something more substantial such as light rail. There is still plenty of room to develop a good system, as Nashville is not very dense, even in the core area (this is changing fast though). Something similar to Charlotte's Lynx would be ideal especially connecting hot growth areas. The problem is of course, convincing leadership to accept funding, the population that sitting in traffic several hours a day is not feasible, that it's SAFE and not just for low income ethnic groups, and lastly, that business will pass Nashville over without an effective way of moving people. They are adding more lanes to the interstates, but that, alone, will not be enough for a fast growing metro like Nashville.
Yes, that seems to be a major hurdle in Nashville. The woeful performance of the Music City Star doesn't help.

Whenever I observe peer cities, I usually see them light years ahead of Jacksonville in terms of leadership and planning. Nashville is one of the very few (perhaps only true peer) that doesnt have its act together in this regard. Dont get me wrong, there is a lot of positive happening in Nashville that Jaxsons are envious of, but when it comes to transit y'all are in a similar mess that we're in. At least it looks like your AMP isn't moving forward...our BRT has finally broken ground. Thankfully it has been pared down from the multi-billion dollar boondoggle that was original proposed, and now it's not much more than just express bus service, which actually could be very complementary and useful. Plus...it's moving forward with sizable federal funding, which is always nice. But as far as light rail and commuter rail goes, this is gonna be another decade long battle (and it's already been a few decades of discussion and study) which I get the feeling is the same situation in Nashville.
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Old 05-12-2015, 12:20 AM
 
6,416 posts, read 10,820,252 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by projectmaximus View Post
Yes, that seems to be a major hurdle in Nashville. The woeful performance of the Music City Star doesn't help.

Whenever I observe peer cities, I usually see them light years ahead of Jacksonville in terms of leadership and planning. Nashville is one of the very few (perhaps only true peer) that doesnt have its act together in this regard. Dont get me wrong, there is a lot of positive happening in Nashville that Jaxsons are envious of, but when it comes to transit y'all are in a similar mess that we're in. At least it looks like your AMP isn't moving forward...our BRT has finally broken ground. Thankfully it has been pared down from the multi-billion dollar boondoggle that was original proposed, and now it's not much more than just express bus service, which actually could be very complementary and useful. Plus...it's moving forward with sizable federal funding, which is always nice. But as far as light rail and commuter rail goes, this is gonna be another decade long battle (and it's already been a few decades of discussion and study) which I get the feeling is the same situation in Nashville.
I think the biggest problem with Nashville's transportation woes has to do with implementation rather than planning. I think the planning is there. Plenty of people recognize the need for better transit. I'll lay out a few reasons why we have struggled to get anything substantial off the ground:

-Urban vs. suburban mentality. Nashville isn't an overly urban place. We have pockets of good urban density, but outside of the older core, it's really suburban in nature, and therefore very car dependent. This car dependence alters the way that a lot of people think about both transit and development in general. Show a high-density development proposal to an urbanite, and you might get a favorable response for the anticipated increase in density and ability to support mass transit. Show that same proposal to a suburbanite and you are likely to get the question "but where will they all park??" One of the things that killed the Amp was the idea of dedicated lanes for the BRT, as well as, strangely, the elimination of on-street parking along West End.

-The association of transit with much larger cities. A very common response to any transit proposal is "we don't need that! We're not New York or Chicago! As if a BRT line or rail line is equivalent to either of those massive transit networks. Forget trying to compare more modest examples of Portland, Denver, Salt Lake, or even Charlotte, which development-wise is much more similar to our situation.

-Sticker shock. Anything over $100 million is pretty much seen as a gargantuan waste of taxpayer dollars -- no matter what the breakdown of "who's paying?" is. People haven't adjusted for inflation in years if not decades.

-CSX. Forget any possibility of passenger rail on any other major corridor (the Music City Star is on tracks that are not owned by CSX). CSX won't even entertain the idea of it. Yes, their tracks are very busy, and some of them need double-tracking. But they won't even sit at the table. Aside from using the center lanes of the interstate (which would be absurdly expensive, given the track mileage we're talking about), there's no other real option than to piggy-back on CSX rails. The great thing about them is that they run right through the middle of most of the heavy population zones, as well as right into the downtowns of surrounding suburbs. It will take federal action to get them to play ball. I don't see that happening in this current congress. I don't see why public dollars couldn't be used to double track and upgrade the lines, with the benefit that CSX would have much needed extra capacity when commuter trains were not running.

-Politics. It should come as no shock which party generally supports, and which party generally opposes public transit. This could could also take the form of collective importance vs. individual importance. Nashville and Davidson County are solidly blue, while the suburbs are mostly bright red. Strangely enough, even the "red" suburban mayors seem to be on-board with regional planning and transit discussions, some of their constituents are not. And the people who are especially not are in the state legislature. I won't go too deep into allegations of entities funding an anti-transit agenda, but it should be noted that they are out there, and very effective at the state level of politics. That's right, when the city of Nashville wants to do something for it's citizens, the state actually stepped in and tried to put a halt to it. Forget trying to get state funding for something like the Amp, there are politicians that wanted to make it illegal to build it. **it should be specially noted that there is one red suburban state senator that has been calling for studies for a monorail from Murfreesboro to Nashville. While I think it's sort of pie-in-the-sky and certainly cost-prohibitive, I am thankful that someone is at least exploring alternatives. Too many others have their heads buried in the sand.

-Clarity of vision and advocacy. This is one area where I think the mayor of Nashville failed. Not that he didn't have vision or advocate it, but he did not effectively convey it. My personal opinion is that he was too busy working on 10 other side projects (some of them major as well) that not enough attention and energy was given to this. Rather than debate and fully vet the plans, there was a perception that the decisions were made, and THEN the plans to build were made. Despite there being quite a bit of input from the public in the planning stages, I think a real transit advocate would have put all of their energy in making this happen. While it certainly wasn't in the language of the plan, too many people seemed to think it was pitched as a "fix-all" plan, when it certainly wasn't. Residents and leaders in North Nashville (which is more dependent on public transit anyways) felt like they were being left out. I think a good plan would have shown that the Amp was the beginning of a new transportation network, one that would connect multiple inner city neighborhoods, not just the "privileged" west side, the "touristy" downtown, and the "hip" east side.


In the end, the death of the Amp isn't the worst thing in the world. It's a design that could have been improved upon. I would hate to see a incomplete or imperfect transit system implemented and become an obstacle for future transit plans.
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Old 05-12-2015, 10:28 AM
 
Location: Miami-Jax
6,275 posts, read 6,917,692 times
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We are saying the same thing...perhaps I just didnt use the right wording. You literally could have replaced your entire post with Jacksonville and it would be accurate. Right down to details like the suburban mayors' support of commuter rail, the largely blue urban core mentality and red suburbs, the difficulties in getting CSX to lease track (imagine that...as CSX HQ are in downtown Jax and they try in some ways to be a benefactor and catalyst of urban progress in the area) that is already perfectly positioned for three lines of a commuter rail system that would serve much of the area's commuting population...

It's crazy to think y'all are in the same boat as us. I guess in some ways, we in Jax aren't the only ones left behind.
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Old 05-12-2015, 02:34 PM
 
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I hear ya. Hopefully both cities will solve these problems in due time.
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Old 05-13-2015, 07:13 AM
 
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All of them have a great deal of potential. In different ways. Nashville is an obvious choice. Jacksonville, too. Birmingham has pretty much gotten its act together in the past ten years and is in the process of becoming a distribution and auto manufacturing center with a downtown that is transforming at a remarkable pace. All of the cities have made large strides towards livability, making them more and more attractive to companies looking to expand or even move.

Last edited by cpg35223; 05-13-2015 at 07:34 AM..
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Old 05-13-2015, 08:42 AM
 
29,716 posts, read 27,143,552 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cpg35223 View Post
All of them have a great deal of potential. In different ways. Nashville is an obvious choice. Jacksonville, too. Birmingham has pretty much gotten its act together in the past ten years and is in the process of becoming a distribution and auto manufacturing center with a downtown that is transforming at a remarkable pace. All of the cities have made large strides towards livability, making them more and more attractive to companies looking to expand or even move.
Auto manufacturing center?
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