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View Poll Results: What city is most poised to become another powerhouse of the South
Richmond, Va 27 9.96%
New Orleans, LA 24 8.86%
Nashville, TN 107 39.48%
Jacksonville, FL 14 5.17%
Louisville, KY 10 3.69%
Raleigh, NC 71 26.20%
Birmingham, AL 16 5.90%
Memphis, TN 2 0.74%
Voters: 271. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 03-30-2015, 01:12 PM
 
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Originally Posted by 80s_kid View Post
Yes, that is a huge advantage for RDU but does it really put it above MCO when we gauge which city does well at economic influence, retail, vibrancy and growth? If anything, Orlando is to tourism what The Triangle is to Education (they will both attract and get some people to stay in the area I'm sure).

Right now, Orlando is higher up than RDU from what I see.
But higher ed is a better basis for long-term growth and prosperity than tourism, which typically results in an overabundance of lower-paying service jobs. I know Orlando has more than tourism, but I'm talking about the industries that put both cities on the map. Orlando has an edge on the Triangle right now because it's bigger, but on a pound for pound basis in most categories, I think the Triangle wins out.
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Old 03-30-2015, 01:24 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
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Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
But higher ed is a better basis for long-term growth and prosperity than tourism, which typically results in an overabundance of lower-paying service jobs. I know Orlando has more than tourism, but I'm talking about the industries that put both cities on the map. Orlando has an edge on the Triangle right now because it's bigger, but on a pound for pound basis in most categories, I think the Triangle wins out.
Do not agree at all, Orlando has over 3 million, Raleigh Durham right at 2 ish. Massive tourist destination,(Orlando), that blows all of what Raleigh might have away, that is their industry.
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Old 03-30-2015, 01:34 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
But higher ed is a better basis for long-term growth and prosperity than tourism, which typically results in an overabundance of lower-paying service jobs. I know Orlando has more than tourism, but I'm talking about the industries that put both cities on the map. Orlando has an edge on the Triangle right now because it's bigger, but on a pound for pound basis in most categories, I think the Triangle wins out.
Yeah, well you are right in the higher education department. My entire premise is that Orlando's already major and well known (even internationally) than Raleigh...I'm sure that the leaders of Orlando are trying to get to another level (like a Nashville) while Raleigh is trying to become major area (Northern VA).
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Old 03-30-2015, 02:23 PM
 
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I think Charlotte, Raleigh/Durham, Nashville, and Orlando are all roughly equal.

We don't have a lot of tourism around Raleigh/Durham, in fact we barely have any. However, it certainly helps having UNC-Chapel Hill, Duke, and NC State in the area. Without them, no Research Triangle Park.
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Old 03-30-2015, 02:52 PM
 
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Originally Posted by bigstick View Post
Do not agree at all, Orlando has over 3 million, Raleigh Durham right at 2 ish. Massive tourist destination,(Orlando), that blows all of what Raleigh might have away, that is their industry.
Greater Orlando is right at about 3 million, but higher ed and RTP in the Triangle have a more significant economic impact than tourism in Orlando. This is exhibited by the fact that Orlando's CSA has a GDP of $127 billion, while the GDP of Raleigh's and Durham's MSAs combined (which have a population of around 1.75 million) is $109 billion. So we're talking a population difference of over a million but a GDP difference of only about $18 billion, equal to the economy of Mobile which has less than half a million people in its metro. Clearly the Triangle punches above its weight economically a bit more than Orlando.
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Old 03-30-2015, 03:03 PM
 
Location: South Beach and DT Raleigh
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Particularly among this list, no city other than Raleigh better offers the collection of data points and formula that drive success. Its growth rate is the fastest; its education level is the highest; its education institutions are top notch; its STEM jobs community is robust and mature and it's the capital of its state.
What is missing in Raleigh is a cultural brand recognition. Right or wrong, one conjures an image when hearing the names of other cities like Nashville, Orlando and New Orleans in particular. Nonetheless, not having a cultural brand hasn't stopped Raleigh in the last few decades and it won't stop it in its tracks now. However, it is something that Raleigh and the Triangle needs to address as the metro continues its shift from a collection of college towns and state capital built around an international research park to what it will become in the future.
The Triangle is the South's awakening giant.
To put some data behind this assertion, consider the following results of the formula that Raleigh offers.
In 1990, The combined Raleigh/Durham/Chapel Hill MSA housed 855,545. By 2000, the population increased to 1,187,941. In 2003, the Triangle was split in two with Durham & Chapel Hill peeled away to stand alone as its own MSA. Today, and only 14 years later, Raleigh's MSA alone is larger (1.242 million) than the combined metro was in 2000 and the Triangle's CSA population is nearing 2.1 million. Before the end of the decade, the Triangle will have more than doubled its population since 2000.
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Old 03-30-2015, 03:17 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rnc2mbfl View Post
Particularly among this list, no city other than Raleigh better offers the collection of data points and formula that drive success. Its growth rate is the fastest; its education level is the highest; its education institutions are top notch; its STEM jobs community is robust and mature and it's the capital of its state.
What is missing in Raleigh is a cultural brand recognition. Right or wrong, one conjures an image when hearing the names of other cities like Nashville, Orlando and New Orleans in particular. Nonetheless, not having a cultural brand hasn't stopped Raleigh in the last few decades and it won't stop it in its tracks now. However, it is something that Raleigh and the Triangle needs to address as the metro continues its shift from a collection of college towns and state capital built around an international research park to what it will become in the future.
The Triangle is the South's awakening giant.
To put some data behind this assertion, consider the following results of the formula that Raleigh offers.
In 1990, The combined Raleigh/Durham/Chapel Hill MSA housed 855,545. By 2000, the population increased to 1,187,941. In 2003, the Triangle was split in two with Durham & Chapel Hill peeled away to stand alone as its own MSA. Today, and only 14 years later, Raleigh's MSA alone is larger (1.242 million) than the combined metro was in 2000 and the Triangle's CSA population is nearing 2.1 million. Before the end of the decade, the Triangle will have more than doubled its population since 2000.
More growth for the Triangle? Oh, great! More soulless suburban sprawl ripping apart the countryside destroying southern culture and replacing it with strip malls and apartment complexes. Seriously can't wait!

Anyway, Raleigh doesn't have an identity for this reason. It was never a Richmond, or maybe a Charleston or New Orleans. It was puny up until the 1960's, so it doesn't have a ton of history. It's about as "New South" as you can get. The universities are the image of the Triangle, particularly the college basketball rivalries between them. The Upper Piedmont of NC, aka Tobacco Road, is the best area in the nation for college basketball. This is how most folks know about the Research Triangle. Seriously, there are so many Duke fans out there who have never laid foot in the state of NC. Charlotte has NASCAR, we have ACC basketball.
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Old 03-30-2015, 04:14 PM
 
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I wouldn't consider Orlando or Austin part of "the south" in any real sense.
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Old 03-30-2015, 04:16 PM
 
Location: Tokyo, Japan
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Originally Posted by tablemtn View Post
I wouldn't consider Orlando or Austin part of "the south" in any real sense.
I don't either and I've lived in one of those two. I just view TX as TX, its own region. FL as FL, its own region. To me, South is everything south of VA, north of FL, and east of TX (so basically NC, SC, GA, AL, MS, LA, AR, KY, TN).

Though there is room for disagreement, I wouldn't necessarily care much about difference in opinion. Mind has been made up for a long time now.

Last edited by Facts Kill Rhetoric; 03-30-2015 at 04:42 PM..
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Old 03-30-2015, 04:35 PM
 
Location: South Beach and DT Raleigh
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Originally Posted by JayJayCB View Post
More growth for the Triangle? Oh, great! More soulless suburban sprawl ripping apart the countryside destroying southern culture and replacing it with strip malls and apartment complexes. Seriously can't wait!
Have you been downtown lately?
What Raleigh has in history is now treasured and is being lovingly restored. Those restorations are being augmented by an enormous amount of new construction and projects in the core and the same is happening in Durham.
Time was when all new development was expanding the footprint into suburbia but that's not the case anymore. True, suburbia still happens but there's a renewed interest in the cores of the cities and the redevelopment of already established areas.
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