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Old 04-03-2015, 02:45 PM
 
Location: Tokyo, Japan
6,479 posts, read 7,708,485 times
Reputation: 7295

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pemgin View Post
I can't really argue that Atlanta isn't still a largely car dependent city, but it's trying to get things done. The city just voted for a $250 million bond referendum, some of which will go toward building complete streets and major improvements to sidewalks. The state legislature just yesterday granted approval for the Beltline to enter into PPPs to accelerate the construction of the Atlanta BeltLine // Where Atlanta Comes Together..

Atlanta is still stymied by the state when it comes to funding MARTA. A transportation bill that initially allocated $100 million to public transit was gutted and the state legislature, for reasons still unclear, prevented the jurisdictions served by MARTA from voting to increase the percentage of sales tax allocated to MARTA from 1% to 1.5%. This would have provided around $200 million extra a year to MARTA.
All of these cities will improve.

I have seen Houston and Dallas in the recent months and areas where the sidewalks have needed repair are having that done (as well as widening). Some examples of that are Upper Kirby, Midtown, Uptown (Dallas), Museum District (Houston) among other areas. The cities are also actively engaging in adding more greenbelts (like the Trinity Project or Buffalo Bayou projects) and also add more bike trails among the like.

I think Houston's bus system is about to get a major overhaul and its light rail, like the OP mentioned has 4 lines currently in the process of opening, which would connect more Inner Loop areas with one another.

Houston has okay density relative to its peers and it is densifying even more so, that is the most notable change. The structural density is coming along and it is replacing what used to be open fields, abandoned concrete lots, or old worn out apartments buildings. In Dallas, this is the same case.

So yes, a move in the right direction but NOLA101 is right, these cities along with Miami, Phoenix, San Diego would all be condidates for the world's bottom 10 in urbanity for places over 3 million people (at least in the advanced world, some places in the third world may be more walkable but also bombed out, literally).

This is probably exactly what is happening in Atlanta too. Expansion of greenbelts, transit, bus system, infill, revitalization, probably new urban parks/urban park revitalizations, and densification. Right?

 
Old 04-03-2015, 02:56 PM
 
Location: City of Atlanta
2,587 posts, read 1,496,039 times
Reputation: 3379
Quote:
Originally Posted by Red John View Post
This is probably exactly what is happening in Atlanta too. Expansion of greenbelts, transit, bus system, infill, revitalization, probably new urban parks/urban park revitalizations, and densification. Right?
Correct
 
Old 04-03-2015, 02:57 PM
 
Location: Tokyo, Japan
6,479 posts, read 7,708,485 times
Reputation: 7295
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pemgin View Post
Correct
Share some of the projects when you get the time. I like seeing this stuff.

I have already seen the Houston, Dallas, Miami urban revitalization projects. So am familiar with the course and trajectory those cities are on, with those three being the "peer" cities Atlanta is most often grouped with. Curious to see some from Atlanta too.
 
Old 04-03-2015, 03:12 PM
 
Location: New York City
1,219 posts, read 967,991 times
Reputation: 994
Hell no. Every city has an urban core, doesn't mean that the city itself is urban. To keep it 100, the only US cities that can be called urban on any scale are:

NYC, Philadelphia, Boston, Chicago, D.C., San Francisco, Baltimore, and that's it. Cities like Atlanta, Houston, Dallas, Norfolk/7 cities, Detroit, Cleveland, etc look pretty country outside of the core.
 
Old 04-03-2015, 04:30 PM
 
Location: Limbo
6,457 posts, read 5,906,067 times
Reputation: 6224
While there are parts of Atlanta that are quite dense; Downtown, Midtown, and a portion of Buckhead, a decent chunk of the city is large, multi-million dollar estates that are unlikely to be razed in favor of dense development any time soon.

The metro sprawls like mad, I don't think anyone can argue that, but the city of Atlanta has the ability to become more dense in its core without touching the million dollar homes if it so desires.
 
Old 04-03-2015, 04:54 PM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
18,207 posts, read 25,902,249 times
Reputation: 8963
Quote:
Originally Posted by nonsence View Post
Hell no. Every city has an urban core, doesn't mean that the city itself is urban. To keep it 100, the only US cities that can be called urban on any scale are:

NYC, Philadelphia, Boston, Chicago, D.C., San Francisco, Baltimore, and that's it. Cities like Atlanta, Houston, Dallas, Norfolk/7 cities, Detroit, Cleveland, etc look pretty country outside of the core.
Anybody that says that these cities look country outside the cores have never actually been to the country.
 
Old 04-03-2015, 05:01 PM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
18,207 posts, read 25,902,249 times
Reputation: 8963
To me, the actual city of Houston is everything inside the loop. This is the only area where there can be a sustainable urban environment. The rest of the actual city has very little chance to ever urbanize IMO. The inner loop has a population of around 480,000. That's roughly 5k per sq mile. Not nearly dense enough though still higher than I would have thought.

Last edited by JMT; 04-05-2015 at 02:46 PM..
 
Old 04-03-2015, 09:54 PM
 
Location: New York City
1,219 posts, read 967,991 times
Reputation: 994
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spade View Post
Anybody that says that these cities look country outside the cores have never actually been to the country.
Vine city/English avenue aka the bluff in ATL, not far west of downtown ATL, is straight up country, everything about it. The shotgun houses, tall weeds and grass, the way bamas dress. This applies to most of metro ATL too.
 
Old 04-03-2015, 10:02 PM
 
Location: The Dirty South.
1,567 posts, read 1,306,664 times
Reputation: 1087
Quote:
Originally Posted by nonsence View Post
Vine city/English avenue aka the bluff in ATL, not far west of downtown ATL, is straight up country, everything about it. The shotgun houses, tall weeds and grass, the way bamas dress. This applies to most of metro ATL too.
Have you been to the truly rural parts of Georgia such as statesboro or brooklet. Atl nowdays is far from country.
 
Old 04-03-2015, 10:17 PM
 
Location: Seattle aka tier 3 city :)
1,078 posts, read 893,983 times
Reputation: 667
Why do people keep bringing up the metro?
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