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View Poll Results: Richmond VA vs. New Orleans LA?
Richmond 53 52.48%
New Orleans 39 38.61%
Neither 9 8.91%
Voters: 101. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 04-09-2015, 03:32 AM
 
998 posts, read 800,187 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tcave360 View Post
We're so frightened
And lame......
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Old 04-09-2015, 05:32 AM
 
Location: California x North Carolina (soon)...
3,330 posts, read 2,251,159 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mwahfromtheheart View Post
Since sports somehow became an issue here, there's something that's not known or been said about the Saints...

Louisiana has always been a HUGE football scene. And I mean VERY big. We have given the NFL the most Superbowl winning Quarterbacks if that means anything.

In the early 60s when Football wasn't big and there were only a dozen or so teams in the NFL, the NFL decided to bring a preseason game to New Orleans. Now, back in that time it was pretty hard in general to fill a stadium at all. When they decided to bring a preseason game to New Orleans, they were shocked to see that tens of thousands of people showed up to watch. By comparison to other teams with much larger markets, that was huge so they continued to bring preseason games to New Orleans. Eventually the NFL commissioner and some LA senator made a deal to bring the Saints to the city.

Fast forward to Katrina. Did you know that the NFL commissioner fought with Benson to keep the Saints in New Orleans after Katrina? Before Katrina, Benson was threatening to leave if we didn't build him a new stadium. Katrina happened and there was more obvious plays on trying to move to San Antonio or LA. When things were looking a little ridiculous, the commissioner made then Governor Kathleen Blanco a promise: make the Superdome operational and he will promise a Saitns return. Low and behold, the very next year on the very first opening home game, the stadium was operational and they stayed right in New Orleans. Why? The NFL offered incentives to Benson to stay in New Orleans. Why? People are fiercely loyal to football here.

The Saints returned after a 3-13 record and a year on the road, and after a huge heartbreaking ordeal between the fans and the team, the New Orleans Saints season tickets sold out despite having an extremely small market. The Saints, even though they had a losing season last year, was second in ratings for the market, ahead of Seattle and behind Green Bay. Last year when they had a winning record, they mopped the floor with Green Bay.

Bomb on us for bags all you want, but give us hope and we go nuts over our Saints.



Sounds like Richmond is great suburb living. New Orleans has suburbs like that too, just not hilly ones.

New Orleans was once the richest city in the USA at one point and has 20 historic districts in it. There are very nice houses here. We have neighborhoods where mansions go on for miles and 100+ year old oak trees line the streets. Lastly, we weren't in the news from trying to secede from the city, I think you're speaking of Baton Rouge, which is our state capital. A section of that city wanted to break off and form its own.

Also, I think I've said this to the OP before as we have spoke various times on the board, but New Orleans is being looked at as a top urban college destination, a top player in the healthcare field, we're emerging as a huge IT destination, #2 in films being shot in US cities (behind only LA), Brad Pitt lives here (mm), we're considered one of the best cities to do business in, one of the best places to form a start up business, one of the nations best brain drains ... we're handling our own.

I can understand why people don't wanna live here though. If you want quiet I'd bet Richmond is the place to go because something new is happening in NOLA every day - whether it be a festival or some psycho going on a rampage in the airport with a machete (silly psychos, they're everywhere).
I appreciate your post, but I disagree with the "fiercely loyal" part to football. It's not about wearing the bags. It's not that a preseason game in the 60s which drew tens of thousands ISNT great---that got the Nfl to bring s team, right? It's thst, for years, the city abandoned the Saints when they lost. Mediocre fan support isn't "fiercely loyal". For comparison's sake, take the Redskins, or the Bills , or the Browns. All have pretty much been losers for the last 15 years, and yet all consistently sell out, all are annually Top 10 in fan attendance, and in the case of Washington especially, are top 10 in merchandise sales---through all the losing! If we rewind just over a decade, and recall when the Saints were perennial losers from inception, there is no year they were top 10 in either merchandise sales or tickets sold. Not a one....

Obviously, not just Katrina, but Sean Payton-Drew Bree's have made the Saints insanely popular, and nothing I'm saying applies to the post-2005 Saints. But to act like the first 38 years of "loyalty" didn't happen is s disservice to the conversation. Everybody loves the Saints when Benaon threatened a move. The Redskins/Cowboys/Browns will never have that issue, because the city supports the team during historic losing as well as championship runs....

So to correlate to the Richmond v. New Orleans convo, my ONLY argument about NFL football is that although the Redskins don't play in Richmond, the loyalty has a longer tradition in that city and is more woven into the city's culture. This doesn't beat being able to drive 10 minutes to a Saints game if you so choose, because clearly that option is a plus. But having a major league team in the city does absolutely nothing to speak of diehard loyalty to a sport, especially when for much of a team's existence, that loyalty was questionable....

It was another poster who wanted to bring up NBA/NFL. Even so, when you consider not only the following of sports, but the participation in a variety of sports, I just don't see how Richmond loses to New Orleans in this arena....

Per your other comments, you've COMPLETELY mislabeled Richmond as "suburban living". I actually think the two cities are on even ground when speaking of its suburbs. But New Orleans isn't s more urban city than Richmond, so you lose there. Not only does Richmond--which is smaller in land area--have a larger urban area, Richmond also has higher peak densities than ANYWHERE in New Orleans. We get it: the Quarter and the surrounding downtown neighborhoods are full of hustle and bustle. Where else? At worst, neighborhood-by-neighborhood will be a tie, but Richmond is probably the favorite. Much of New Orleans' hustle and bustle is because of enormous tourist activity, a plus I don't understate. But Richmond has real street action, locally driven urban street life. There goes your "quiet" argument...

And I'm willing to give a draw on history, but you're not seriously saying New Orleans beats Richmond in that category, are you? New Orleans without a doubt has a place at the table of historical importance. The entire city of Richmond is a historian's wet dream. New Orleans' mansions are great, as is the fact that Richmond has some of the most diverse architecture in the nation, from colonization. The two cities can compete toe to toe on both fronts here, but Richmond doesn't lose in either one. I don't know how many historic "districts" are in Richmond. I do know from the East End to the West, Southside to North, there are mile after mile of historic neighborhoods in Richmond.

My initial assumption is that because of what New Orleans offers in entertainment, it wins the overall head to head. I said this in my first post. However, in the topics discussed in this and recent posts, there may not be a clear winner in some areas, but New Orleans certainly doesn't bedt Richmond in those fields...
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Old 04-09-2015, 05:37 AM
 
1,833 posts, read 1,709,887 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Poquoson7 View Post
And lame......
How is someone from hampton roads going to call md burbs lame. LMAO.
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Old 04-09-2015, 05:57 AM
 
Location: Closer than you think!
2,103 posts, read 3,168,097 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Deluusions View Post
How is someone from hampton roads going to call md burbs lame. LMAO.

They are lame.
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Old 04-09-2015, 06:58 AM
 
1,833 posts, read 1,709,887 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cdw1084 View Post
They are lame.
No not at all. Pg county is wack I'll admit, it's an acquired taste definitely.
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Old 04-09-2015, 07:26 AM
 
998 posts, read 800,187 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Deluusions View Post
How is someone from hampton roads going to call md burbs lame. LMAO.
Because that's how I see it Richie.
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Old 04-09-2015, 07:33 AM
 
1,833 posts, read 1,709,887 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Poquoson7 View Post
Because that's how I see it Richie.
Bethesda, silver spring, takoma park etc are not lame. Montgomery county is like Fairfax county which is in NoVa which you say would make them cry. Poor logic.
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Old 04-09-2015, 10:26 AM
 
1,653 posts, read 5,010,020 times
Reputation: 1423
Quote:
Originally Posted by nonsence View Post
hardly anyone commutes from down there or vice versa
Senator Tim Kaine does. He lives in Richmond and commutes to DC, mostly splitting his time between the two. While I'm sure everyone agree that Baltimore is more connected to DC than Richmond is, that fact doesn't mean Richmond isn't very connected to the DC region. Development and population trends are working their way from DC to Richmond more and more each year.

But as far as the poll goes, I chose Richmond. As a graduate of VCU and former resident of Richmond, I can say with confidence that it's a pretty good city. It's not a major city, but definitely has its own unique culture and vibe that MANY people have become extremely attracted to. NOLA does as well, but for me personally I'd go with Richmond. It's a more stable region, better climate, and offers more variety of lifestyle choices in my opinion.

Although I do enjoy NOLA, and have a couple friends down there. Someone else commented earlier though that summed it up nicely: to visit = NOLA, to live = Richmond.
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Old 04-09-2015, 02:43 PM
 
Location: New Orleans, LA
1,291 posts, read 1,118,532 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by murksiderock View Post
I appreciate your post, but I disagree with the "fiercely loyal" part to football. It's not about wearing the bags. It's not that a preseason game in the 60s which drew tens of thousands ISNT great---that got the Nfl to bring s team, right? It's thst, for years, the city abandoned the Saints when they lost. Mediocre fan support isn't "fiercely loyal". For comparison's sake, take the Redskins, or the Bills , or the Browns. All have pretty much been losers for the last 15 years, and yet all consistently sell out, all are annually Top 10 in fan attendance, and in the case of Washington especially, are top 10 in merchandise sales---through all the losing! If we rewind just over a decade, and recall when the Saints were perennial losers from inception, there is no year they were top 10 in either merchandise sales or tickets sold. Not a one....

Obviously, not just Katrina, but Sean Payton-Drew Bree's have made the Saints insanely popular, and nothing I'm saying applies to the post-2005 Saints. But to act like the first 38 years of "loyalty" didn't happen is s disservice to the conversation. Everybody loves the Saints when Benaon threatened a move. The Redskins/Cowboys/Browns will never have that issue, because the city supports the team during historic losing as well as championship runs....

So to correlate to the Richmond v. New Orleans convo, my ONLY argument about NFL football is that although the Redskins don't play in Richmond, the loyalty has a longer tradition in that city and is more woven into the city's culture. This doesn't beat being able to drive 10 minutes to a Saints game if you so choose, because clearly that option is a plus. But having a major league team in the city does absolutely nothing to speak of diehard loyalty to a sport, especially when for much of a team's existence, that loyalty was questionable....

It was another poster who wanted to bring up NBA/NFL. Even so, when you consider not only the following of sports, but the participation in a variety of sports, I just don't see how Richmond loses to New Orleans in this arena....

Per your other comments, you've COMPLETELY mislabeled Richmond as "suburban living". I actually think the two cities are on even ground when speaking of its suburbs. But New Orleans isn't s more urban city than Richmond, so you lose there. Not only does Richmond--which is smaller in land area--have a larger urban area, Richmond also has higher peak densities than ANYWHERE in New Orleans. We get it: the Quarter and the surrounding downtown neighborhoods are full of hustle and bustle. Where else? At worst, neighborhood-by-neighborhood will be a tie, but Richmond is probably the favorite. Much of New Orleans' hustle and bustle is because of enormous tourist activity, a plus I don't understate. But Richmond has real street action, locally driven urban street life. There goes your "quiet" argument...

And I'm willing to give a draw on history, but you're not seriously saying New Orleans beats Richmond in that category, are you? New Orleans without a doubt has a place at the table of historical importance. The entire city of Richmond is a historian's wet dream. New Orleans' mansions are great, as is the fact that Richmond has some of the most diverse architecture in the nation, from colonization. The two cities can compete toe to toe on both fronts here, but Richmond doesn't lose in either one. I don't know how many historic "districts" are in Richmond. I do know from the East End to the West, Southside to North, there are mile after mile of historic neighborhoods in Richmond.

My initial assumption is that because of what New Orleans offers in entertainment, it wins the overall head to head. I said this in my first post. However, in the topics discussed in this and recent posts, there may not be a clear winner in some areas, but New Orleans certainly doesn't bedt Richmond in those fields...
The Saints have been a strong part of NOLA culture since their inception and we've thrown parades based on their success and failures. It's not like you'd have found many fans in the city rooting for anybody else in football. Obviously we're fiercely loyal, we sold out the house, and kept selling it out despite 2 losing seasons in a row after 2006, after the worst natural disaster in recent US history.

I'd like to see what the Redskins or Cowboys do when their teams lose for 3 decades straight, I bet they start going for feel good stories... Oh wait, they did that in North Louisiana. Cowboys fans started wearing Saints gear there right after Katrina or during the SB year. New Orleans never did that, they were Saints fans or they weren't watching out of frustration or protest.

The suburban living deal was a response to somebody else. I know NOLA isn't dense at all, but he made it sound like you can't live a suburban life in the area. But how are you going to make a point in saying that Richmond is not only denser, more urban, but more laid back than New Orleans? Idk, NOLA is pretty laid back in our own way.

Richmond was capital of the Confederacy, NOLA was the jewel of the Confederacy. Yes they both have significant history. But don't underestimate NOLA. There are a million really interesting historical things that are significant to not only the country, but the world with New Orleans history. Also, New Orleans is one of the very few, if not the only city that has created and sustained a unique culture. Other cities may have multiple cultures, or a culture that was imported to them, but none have created, promoted, and still have this. The Creoles of the city are very significant to history in very many ways. And to add a layer of history on top of that, the formerly exiled Acadians found in the surrounding parishes are thought to be the first victims of ethnic cleansing in North America.

New Orleans has more historic districts than any city in the USA with 20. Most of the entire city is made up of historic districts, and that's not an exaggeration. There are so many very well built houses in NOLA that has survived 200 years or more (through hurricanes and all), in and out of the Quarter, and countless more that have been around since the Civil War. Also, let me combine history and architecture for a minute - the Spanish built the quarter because it burned down twice. Some building codes in the Quarter directly correlate with Spain's building codes in 1794.

I could go on and on. NOLA is an extremely interesting city once you start digging. Most people know it's extremely interesting before looking into its history and the reasons behind *everything* here (almost literally), but this town is extremely underrated and can be fairly over stereotyped by the nation. I lived in Louisiana my entire life and I realized that about 2 months after moving here.
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Old 04-09-2015, 02:58 PM
 
Location: New Orleans, LA
1,291 posts, read 1,118,532 times
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It's about preference. NOLA doesn't sleep, It really is one of the livliest cities in the country (despite its density). Richmond has a very detailed and unique set of reasons to live there and can hold their own as far as being interesting. But I think it may come down to what vibe you'd like ... NOLA is extreme, Richmond is pretty steady.

Oh, and there are plenty of places outside of the 1/4 and the CBD that get activity. Magazine St., St. Charles, Carrollton and Canal, Warehouse District, St. Claude Ave to the IC ... and more.
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