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View Poll Results: Knoxville TN vs ROANOKE VA?
Knoxville 24 50.00%
Roanoke 14 29.17%
Neither 10 20.83%
Voters: 48. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 04-15-2015, 11:30 PM
Status: "Ready for Fall" (set 22 days ago)
 
Location: Atlanta
4,645 posts, read 3,015,634 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JayJayCB View Post
However, Eastern Tennessee is probably more similar to Western North Carolina and Northern Georgia.
Scenically, yes. Economically, the Tri-Cities and Western NC do not resemble North Georgia at all (with the exception of the Asheville area somewhat). There is no comparison.

Chattanooga & Knoxville are the shining stars of Eastern Tennessee, and while a very pretty area - the Tri-Cities are not.
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Old 04-16-2015, 12:11 AM
 
Location: Macao
15,699 posts, read 34,703,311 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JayJayCB View Post
I wouldn't say so, no. They both share Bristol, which is pretty interesting. I've driven between both regions and they're not terribly different, same with areas of Northwestern North Carolina like West Jefferson and North Wilkesboro. However, Eastern Tennessee is probably more similar to Western North Carolina and Northern Georgia. Southwest Virginia is probably more similar to Eastern Kentucky and West Virginia.
Interesting! Okay, yeah, I guess I can visually see how there might be a Smokey Mountains/Knoxville/Ashville sphere...

Whereas I guess Southwest Virginia would definitely be in an Eastern Kentucky and West Virginia sphere. That being said, Southwest Virginia REALLY stretches out FAR....so far that the furthest southwest of Virginia is actually in closer proximity to Knoxville than it would be to Roanoke anymore.

I guess it would be important to determine how far northeast does 'Southwest Virginia' extend, and if Roanoke would even be considered part of 'Southwest Virginia'?
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Old 04-16-2015, 01:44 AM
 
Location: Richmond, VA
504 posts, read 469,111 times
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Careful with painting SW VA in broad strokes. As a geographic term it's a vast area, but the Roanoke/Christianburg/Blacksburg area (Virginia Tech) occupies a different social and economic space than say Danville/Martinsville/South Boston, which is what many Virginians consider to be true SW VA. There is unfortunately a significant economic difference between them. When most folks are talking about SW VA, they're talking about Danville and environs which unfortunately feel pretty isolated from the rest of the state.

Whenever I'm in Roanoke, I've been impressed with how much activity is going on in the downtown - more than expected at least, both night and day. Anyhow I think this street tour kind of gives a sense of the feel of the city:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2gEA0cqtCIo

I still think Knoxville has the better growth prospects between the two.
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Old 04-17-2015, 01:01 AM
 
Location: Nashville, TN
4,272 posts, read 3,339,358 times
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^From this video I can definitely see the strong Mid-Atlantic and Appalachian influences. Downtown looks like it has potential as well. Great post.
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Old 04-18-2015, 10:10 AM
 
Location: Macao
15,699 posts, read 34,703,311 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shakeesha View Post
^From this video I can definitely see the strong Mid-Atlantic and Appalachian influences. Downtown looks like it has potential as well. Great post.
Yep, I liked the video as well. The city looks good, from that anyway.
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Old 04-20-2015, 04:43 PM
 
3 posts, read 2,843 times
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I don't know a lot about Knoxville, but I grew up in SW VA (Marion). Roanoke is probably the easternmost part of southwest VA. Trust me, if you ask anyone from the coastal part of VA or NoVa, they will be happy to tell you that Roanoke is part of SW VA. Actually, as far as a lot of them are concerned, VA ends AT Roanoke - even though you can drive 3 more hours down I-81 before hitting Bristol.

I moved to Los Angeles for college and only recently relocated to the area (Asheville NC). My sister also went to LA for college and she ended up moving to Roanoke after that and working as a waitress at Macado's as she applied to grad schools. She wanted to be close to home but was not moving back to Marion. She really liked Roanoke and felt it had a nice combination of cultural offerings and small-city hospitality, as well as being close to the mountains for hiking, Smith Mountain Lake for water sports, etc.
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Old 04-20-2015, 08:21 PM
 
Location: California x North Carolina (soon)...
3,322 posts, read 2,243,861 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ashevillager View Post
I don't know a lot about Knoxville, but I grew up in SW VA (Marion). Roanoke is probably the easternmost part of southwest VA. Trust me, if you ask anyone from the coastal part of VA or NoVa, they will be happy to tell you that Roanoke is part of SW VA. Actually, as far as a lot of them are concerned, VA ends AT Roanoke - even though you can drive 3 more hours down I-81 before hitting Bristol.

I moved to Los Angeles for college and only recently relocated to the area (Asheville NC). My sister also went to LA for college and she ended up moving to Roanoke after that and working as a waitress at Macado's as she applied to grad schools. She wanted to be close to home but was not moving back to Marion. She really liked Roanoke and felt it had a nice combination of cultural offerings and small-city hospitality, as well as being close to the mountains for hiking, Smith Mountain Lake for water sports, etc.
True story, when I was around 14 or 15 we (mom, brother, me) were traveling to Memphis to see my mother's family, as that's where my mom is from. We pulled over for gas in Marion, it was maybe mid afternoon, plenty of sunlight. Anyway, we all entered the gas station to get snacks and buy the gas. The service station had a country bar/counter where a handful of people (3 or 4) were sitting talking to the clerk, and there were maybe two other people in the aisles. Everyone was white. As we walked in, the door chimed and maybe five seconds later, as we walked the aisles for snacks, the conversation from the front of the store went dead silent. The two people in the aisles stopped dead in their tracks...

My mother, being the image of class that she is, spoke to the counter as e came in. She immediately noticed the tension/uncomfortability in the store, and continued speaking to us, her sons, in a regular tone, telling us to get what snacks we wanted. We approached the counter and my mother spoke again, once to the people sitting, then to the clerk, telling her what she wanted on our pump. NOBODY SAID A WORD. Not even an acknowledgement in the form of saying hello back to my mother; my brother and I said nothing. The only time the clerk spoke was to say the price of our chips and drinks. We paid and walked out together....

Outside, we offered to pump th gas, as that was normally something my brother or I did, yet my mom told us to sit in the car and start eating. She pumped; we left....

Now no one followed is out of the store or parking lot, insulted or threw things at us. And in the years since, I've been subjected to a few instances of racism. But I have NEVER felt as uncomfortable as I felt in that store that day. Clearly, these were people unaccustomed to not just not seeing blacks, but seeing blacks walk into that store like that. It was so striking that you could've thought there was a "no coloreds" sign somewhere. We were stared down the entire time, which was less than two minutes, we were in the store, by everyone, so quiet you could've heard a pin drop....

I recognized this at 14/15, and I never will forget that feeling, and never forgot that town. This was in 2003-2004. I looked the city stats up later, confirming that town and general area has very, very few blacks. I vowed never to return to that town....

This was completely off topic, please forgive me, but it's not everyday someone mentions Marion, Virginia. My one and only experience 'there' is one of several (but definitely the most uncomfortable) in Southwest VA. I gotta tell you, Southwest is so far removed from the rest of the Commonwealth, it is literally like a hybrid between West VA and Tennessee. I hate the Southwest...

@aquest, Danville, Lynchburg and the other cities you named are "South SIDE Virginia", not SW...

Last edited by JMT; 04-21-2015 at 04:56 AM..
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Old 04-20-2015, 11:00 PM
 
Location: Nashville, TN
4,272 posts, read 3,339,358 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by murksiderock View Post
True story, when I was around 14 or 15 we (mom, brother, me) were traveling to Memphis to see my mother's family, as that's where my mom is from. We pulled over for gas in Marion, it was maybe mid afternoon, plenty of sunlight. Anyway, we all entered the gas station to get snacks and buy the gas. The service station had a country bar/counter where a handful of people (3 or 4) were sitting talking to the clerk, and there were maybe two other people in the aisles. Everyone was white. As we walked in, the door chimed and maybe five seconds later, as we walked the aisles for snacks, the conversation from the front of the store went dead silent. The two people in the aisles stopped dead in their tracks...

My mother, being the image of class that she is, spoke to the counter as e came in. She immediately noticed the tension/uncomfortability in the store, and continued speaking to us, her sons, in a regular tone, telling us to get what snacks we wanted. We approached the counter and my mother spoke again, once to the people sitting, then to the clerk, telling her what she wanted on our pump. NOBODY SAID A WORD. Not even an acknowledgement in the form of saying hello back to my mother; my brother and I said nothing. The only time the clerk spoke was to say the price of our chips and drinks. We paid and walked out together....

Outside, we offered to pump th gas, as that was normally something my brother or I did, yet my mom told us to sit in the car and start eating. She pumped; we left....

Now no one followed is out of the store or parking lot, insulted or threw things at us. And in the years since, I've been subjected to a few instances of racism. But I have NEVER felt as uncomfortable as I felt in that store that day. Clearly, these were people unaccustomed to not just not seeing blacks, but seeing blacks walk into that store like that. It was so striking that you could've thought there was a "no coloreds" sign somewhere. We were stared down the entire time, which was less than two minutes, we were in the store, by everyone, so quiet you could've heard a pin drop....

I recognized this at 14/15, and I never will forget that feeling, and never forgot that town. This was in 2003-2004. I looked the city stats up later, confirming that town and general area has very, very few blacks. I vowed never to return to that town....

This was completely off topic, please forgive me, but it's not everyday someone mentions Marion, Virginia. My one and only experience 'there' is one of several (but definitely the most uncomfortable) in Southwest VA. I gotta tell you, Southwest is so far removed from the rest of the Commonwealth, it is literally like a hybrid between West VA and Tennessee. I hate the Southwest...

@aquest, Danville, Lynchburg and the other cities you named are "South SIDE Virginia", not SW...
I'm sorry about your experience. I share similar experiences of Eastern Kentucky and East Tennessee (particularly North East Tennessee). East Tennessee is very different from the Middle and Western divisions. My family has doctors, lawyers, and politicians, and generally well known were I grew up so I have a similar upbringing. I am used to people speaking or at the very least, acknowledging others when they walk by or enter a room. It seemed as if the people in those areas were so far removed from modern day thinking and ideals, almost like there was only one type of black person, the kind you see on the nightly news. I never understood how you could be so afraid of someone just because of the color of their skin. The lack of education, poverty, and over-reliance on tradition has something to do with I suppose, but will never justify people treating others as if they are second class citizens. Appalachia has some major issues to overcome.

Last edited by JMT; 04-21-2015 at 04:56 AM..
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Old 04-21-2015, 01:36 AM
 
Location: Macao
15,699 posts, read 34,703,311 times
Reputation: 9230
Quote:
Originally Posted by murksiderock View Post
True story, when I was around 14 or 15 we (mom, brother, me) were traveling to Memphis to see my mother's family, as that's where my mom is from. We pulled over for gas in Marion, it was maybe mid afternoon, plenty of sunlight. Anyway, we all entered the gas station to get snacks and buy the gas. The service station had a country bar/counter where a handful of people (3 or 4) were sitting talking to the clerk, and there were maybe two other people in the aisles. Everyone was white. As we walked in, the door chimed and maybe five seconds later, as we walked the aisles for snacks, the conversation from the front of the store went dead silent. The two people in the aisles stopped dead in their tracks...

My mother, being the image of class that she is, spoke to the counter as e came in. She immediately noticed the tension/uncomfortability in the store, and continued speaking to us, her sons, in a regular tone, telling us to get what snacks we wanted. We approached the counter and my mother spoke again, once to the people sitting, then to the clerk, telling her what she wanted on our pump. NOBODY SAID A WORD. Not even an acknowledgement in the form of saying hello back to my mother; my brother and I said nothing. The only time the clerk spoke was to say the price of our chips and drinks. We paid and walked out together....

Outside, we offered to pump th gas, as that was normally something my brother or I did, yet my mom told us to sit in the car and start eating. She pumped; we left....

Now no one followed is out of the store or parking lot, insulted or threw things at us. And in the years since, I've been subjected to a few instances of racism. But I have NEVER felt as uncomfortable as I felt in that store that day. Clearly, these were people unaccustomed to not just not seeing blacks, but seeing blacks walk into that store like that. It was so striking that you could've thought there was a "no coloreds" sign somewhere. We were stared down the entire time, which was less than two minutes, we were in the store, by everyone, so quiet you could've heard a pin drop....

I recognized this at 14/15, and I never will forget that feeling, and never forgot that town. This was in 2003-2004. I looked the city stats up later, confirming that town and general area has very, very few blacks. I vowed never to return to that town....

This was completely off topic, please forgive me, but it's not everyday someone mentions Marion, Virginia. My one and only experience 'there' is one of several (but definitely the most uncomfortable) in Southwest VA. I gotta tell you, Southwest is so far removed from the rest of the Commonwealth, it is literally like a hybrid between West VA and Tennessee. I hate the Southwest...

@aquest, Danville, Lynchburg and the other cities you named are "South SIDE Virginia", not SW...
Apparently, I've already repped you.

But, I'd just like to say 'thanks for the story.' Great narrative, and just an interesting read. Much appreciated.

Last edited by JMT; 04-21-2015 at 04:55 AM..
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Old 09-01-2017, 12:40 PM
 
1 posts, read 301 times
Reputation: 10
Default Roanoke rocks!

Roanoke is much better. Cleaner, nicer people, better government service, less traffic, overall so much better!
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