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Old 03-03-2017, 03:53 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati (Norwood)
3,378 posts, read 3,695,964 times
Reputation: 1746

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Most certainly a provocative post #128, but also one that will ensue in gnashing of teeth and defensive disputes, especially from the unfortunate cities grouped in Tier 5. Since several of these cities take such great pride in their public transportation (particularly Cleveland), it would be in the best interest of a passenger to protect themselves by remaining glued to their seat.

Last edited by motorman; 03-03-2017 at 04:39 AM..
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Old 03-03-2017, 04:52 AM
 
Location: Center City, Philadelphia
4,559 posts, read 2,521,096 times
Reputation: 2857
Quote:
Tier 2 - Can Walk 1-3 miles without retracing steps - Seattle, Philly

Both are close to Tier 1, but you're boxed in. Philly's great for walking around Center City, and Society Hill --> Rittenhouse Sq is a favorite. But not great to walk below South St, West of 30th St, or North of the Art Museum. Seattle is outstanding DT, Belltown, Capitol Hill, but Queen Anne Hill makes walking over to Fremont and then Ballard impractical.
This comment wraps up a week of inaccurate comments made about Philadelphia. I actually don't think D.C. is as walkable and has many more large superblocks that break up the urban fabric. you can't walk by south street.. guess the Italian market, East Passyunk Ave restaurant district, and the cheesesteak places are in no mans land according to this guy, totally untrue. All of university City and west Philly is no mans land, that's incorrect in every sense. Forget the entertainment district in Northern Liberties, none the less lower Frankfort Ave., a place that is extremely popular to go in Philly. The Fairmount Neighborhood is arguably in the top 5 of most expensive neighborhoods in the city and has seen massive high rise and mixed use developments, but you can't walk there lol.. it's isn't like you can't walk to the next ring of neighborhoods either. Fishtown, Point Breeze, Spruce Hill, Bella Vista, etc. are some of the most popular places to live or buy a house in the city. To say you can't walk to any of these places is so wrong. /end rant

I apologize in advance too, I just read so many comments on here like "Philly and vibrant don't belong in the same sentence", "the crime is high!", "you can't walk past 30th street"(smh).

Last edited by thedirtypirate; 03-03-2017 at 05:37 AM..
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Old 03-03-2017, 06:05 AM
 
Location: The mountain of Airy
5,145 posts, read 4,988,519 times
Reputation: 3406
Quote:
Originally Posted by thedirtypirate View Post
This comment wraps up a week of inaccurate comments made about Philadelphia. I actually don't think D.C. is as walkable and has many more large superblocks that break up the urban fabric. you can't walk by south street.. guess the Italian market, East Passyunk Ave restaurant district, and the cheesesteak places are in no mans land according to this guy, totally untrue. All of university City and west Philly is no mans land, that's incorrect in every sense. Forget the entertainment district in Northern Liberties, none the less lower Frankfort Ave., a place that is extremely popular to go in Philly. The Fairmount Neighborhood is arguably in the top 5 of most expensive neighborhoods in the city and has seen massive high rise and mixed use developments, but you can't walk there lol.. it's isn't like you can't walk to the next ring of neighborhoods either. Fishtown, Point Breeze, Spruce Hill, Bella Vista, etc. are some of the most popular places to live or buy a house in the city. To say you can't walk to any of these places is so wrong. /end rant

I apologize in advance too, I just read so many comments on here like "Philly and vibrant don't belong in the same sentence", "the crime is high!", "you can't walk past 30th street"(smh).
Thank you. TheseGoTo11 is posting like his/her statements are fact, but they are very uninformed. South Philly has a ton of great places to walk and it connects to CC seamlessly. Not sure why you can't walk south of South street. haha.
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Old 03-03-2017, 10:50 AM
 
652 posts, read 420,566 times
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Walkscore (and Bikescore) has issues with Sacramento but the core 4+ square miles has well over 30,000 residents at this point (100K weekday workforce) in a perfect tree lined grid with walk and bike scores above 90. And light rail running through it.
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Old 03-03-2017, 11:10 AM
 
Location: The mountain of Airy
5,145 posts, read 4,988,519 times
Reputation: 3406
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheFlats View Post
Walkscore (and Bikescore) has issues with Sacramento but the core 4+ square miles has well over 30,000 residents at this point (100K weekday workforce) in a perfect tree lined grid with walk and bike scores above 90. And light rail running through it.
Sacramento is really quite beautiful in the core. There's another poster on here that has sent pics. I would love to check it out sometime I'm in CA.
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Old 03-03-2017, 12:05 PM
 
2,302 posts, read 1,064,623 times
Reputation: 1615
ParkScore -2016 Has lots of stats for 100 cities from Park space, to spending on them, to playgrounds. It does not separate biking. Each city then is give a score and placement.

-Methodology-
Acreage + Facilities and Investments + Access = PARKSCORE

-Scoring-
The scoring system recognizes the accomplishments of cities that have made significant investments in their parks without holding dissimilar cities to an unrealistic standard. It enables detailed analysis and allows cities to increase their ParkScore through incremental improvements to different aspects of their park systems.

To determine a city’s ParkScore, we assigned points in three categories: acreage, services and investment, and access.
◾Acreage: 20 points for median park size, and 20 points for park acres as a percentage of city area
◾Facilities and investment: 20 points for spending per resident and 20 points for the average of the four key facilities per-capita (basketball hoops, dog parks, playgrounds, and recreation and senior centers).
◾Access: 40 points for percentage of the population living within a ten-minute walk of a public park

Points for each statistic are assigned by breaking the data range established by our national sample into 20 brackets, with the lowest bracket receiving the least points and the highest bracket receiving the most points.

Each city’s total points—out of a maximum of 120—are then normalized to a ParkScore of up to 100.
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Old 03-04-2017, 10:51 AM
 
Location: South Beach and DT Raleigh
11,543 posts, read 17,888,825 times
Reputation: 10686
Quote:
Originally Posted by DavePa View Post
ParkScore -2016 Has lots of stats for 100 cities from Park space, to spending on them, to playgrounds. It does not separate biking. Each city then is give a score and placement.

-Methodology-
Acreage + Facilities and Investments + Access = PARKSCORE

-Scoring-
The scoring system recognizes the accomplishments of cities that have made significant investments in their parks without holding dissimilar cities to an unrealistic standard. It enables detailed analysis and allows cities to increase their ParkScore through incremental improvements to different aspects of their park systems.

To determine a city’s ParkScore, we assigned points in three categories: acreage, services and investment, and access.
◾Acreage: 20 points for median park size, and 20 points for park acres as a percentage of city area
◾Facilities and investment: 20 points for spending per resident and 20 points for the average of the four key facilities per-capita (basketball hoops, dog parks, playgrounds, and recreation and senior centers).
◾Access: 40 points for percentage of the population living within a ten-minute walk of a public park

Points for each statistic are assigned by breaking the data range established by our national sample into 20 brackets, with the lowest bracket receiving the least points and the highest bracket receiving the most points.

Each city’s total points—out of a maximum of 120—are then normalized to a ParkScore of up to 100.
I don't know about others but the search within the link didn't work for me.
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Old 03-04-2017, 01:25 PM
 
3,579 posts, read 2,019,864 times
Reputation: 3314
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheFlats View Post
Walkscore (and Bikescore) has issues with Sacramento but the core 4+ square miles has well over 30,000 residents at this point (100K weekday workforce) in a perfect tree lined grid with walk and bike scores above 90. And light rail running through it.
That's a pretty low density for the core of a city of two million.

Regarding the tiers post: On the ranked list I agree with Seattle's spot but Philly is tier 1. LA should move up a few tiers. Generally "get shot" areas are safe for people to walk through, though I haven't experenced all of them.
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Old 03-04-2017, 11:20 PM
 
Location: SF Bay Area (formerly DC and Boston)
1,935 posts, read 3,238,420 times
Reputation: 1516
Quote:
Originally Posted by thedirtypirate View Post
I apologize in advance too, I just read so many comments on here like "Philly and vibrant don't belong in the same sentence", "the crime is high!", "you can't walk past 30th street"(smh).
Yeah, knew this would bring out the Philly homers.

Broad St below South is like walking along NY NE in DC past N. Capitol. Technically walkable, but not much to see. East Passyunk is like an island strip surrounded by mediocre neighborhoods. Philly is great for walking compared to Atlanta, but it lacks the connected walkable neighborhoods you get in Boston, SF, and Chicago.
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Old 03-04-2017, 11:24 PM
 
Location: SF Bay Area (formerly DC and Boston)
1,935 posts, read 3,238,420 times
Reputation: 1516
Quote:
Originally Posted by AJNEOA View Post
Sacramento is really quite beautiful in the core. There's another poster on here that has sent pics. I would love to check it out sometime I'm in CA.
It's getting better, and the new basketball arena is helping things.

It has a big problem in that I-5 cuts off DT from the riverfront, and the historic tourist areas that line the riverfront. Overall, Sac reminds me a lot of a midwestern river city. In some ways, it's more like Omaha, KC, or Cincinnati than San Francisco or San Diego.
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