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View Poll Results: Which CSA feels larger?
Chicagoland 136 81.44%
DC/Baltimore 24 14.37%
They feel equal 7 4.19%
Voters: 167. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 07-22-2015, 04:09 PM
 
Location: The City
21,945 posts, read 30,803,938 times
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DC is absolutely growing faster

I believe Chicago has avery low birth rate relative to many other places and a higher death rate

ther is a thread on the component of change which are interesting

Take a place like Pittsburgh as an example, high death rates and lower birth rates but is increasing the educated class - albeit slow a gross number does not always tell the whole picture, that said DC is attracking more jobs and people no doubt but on this comparison Chicago feels much larger and its not even close

to me Chicago feels closer to LA than it does to DC in size
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Old 07-22-2015, 06:00 PM
 
Location: Tokyo, Japan
6,479 posts, read 7,711,641 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kidphilly View Post
I believe Chicago has avery low birth rate relative to many other places and a higher death rate
Chicago's actually a very healthy city in natural increase, as births minus deaths is nearly 50,000 a year (that alone would amount to 500,000 people just off natural increase in a decade (10 year period)).

MSA: Chicago-Naperville-Elgin, IL-IN-WI, 2011
- Births: 123,700
- Deaths: 66,706
Total Natural Increase: + 56,994

MSA: Chicago-Naperville-Elgin, IL-IN-WI, 2012
- Births: 122,181
- Deaths: 67,091
Total Natural Increase: + 55,090

MSA: Chicago-Naperville-Elgin, IL-IN-WI, 2013
- Births: 119,903
- Deaths: 69,487
Total Natural Increase: + 50,416

MSA: Chicago-Naperville-Elgin, IL-IN-WI, 2014
- Births: 119,405
- Deaths: 70,059
Total Natural Increase: + 49,346

By total natural increase alone the Chicago MSA has grown by 211,846 people from April, 2010 to July 1, 2014.

However the real issue with Chicago's growth is in migration, more people leave the place than enter, to the point where it diminishes much of the gain attributed to natural increase.

MSA: Chicago-Naperville-Elgin, IL-IN-WI, 2011
- Domestic Migration: -57,441
- International Immigration: 24,319
Total Migration Increase: -33,122

MSA: Chicago-Naperville-Elgin, IL-IN-WI, 2012
- Domestic Migration: -53,677
- International Immigration: 24,867
Total Migration Increase: -28,810

MSA: Chicago-Naperville-Elgin, IL-IN-WI, 2013
- Domestic Migration: -49,798
- International Immigration: 27,216
Total Migration Increase: -22,582

MSA: Chicago-Naperville-Elgin, IL-IN-WI, 2014
- Domestic Migration: -65,815
- International Immigration: 27,410
Total Migration Increase: -38,405

By total migration increase, the Chicago MSA has suffered a total loss of (-)122,919 people from April, 2010 to July 1, 2014.

Overall when you take the Total Natural Increase (211,846) and subtract the Total Migration Increase (-122,919), that leaves the Chicago MSA with a total growth of 88,927 total people in the span of April, 2010 - July 1, 2014.

Relative to other peer cities such as Boston, Miami, San Francisco, Philadelphia, New York, and even Los Angeles, Chicago is much younger than most of them and a bit younger than Los Angeles in age, and about on par in the same general range as Washington, DC. Its fertility rate is actually higher than all of them except for Los Angeles and Washington DC, which are around the same ballpark as Chicago. The out-migration from Chicago is a bit curious as Chicago MSA is also not a very expensive place, its median housing values and apartment rents (at nearly all levels) are more or less in line with the places people from Chicago are moving to. Plus a substantial amount move to more expensive locales such as New York and San Francisco, which are often double or triple the price of Chicago.

I guess it can be chalked up to a lackluster job market and "recovery" which is further agitated by fiscal irresponsibility among Chicago politicians and a financial gridlock on city services and resources. Issue is how to turn that around.
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Old 07-22-2015, 06:14 PM
 
Location: MPLS/CHI
553 posts, read 446,074 times
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Any stats on what kind of people Chicago is losing? Is it losing lower wage workers and gaining young professionals? Is it the opposite?
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Old 07-22-2015, 06:37 PM
 
2,601 posts, read 3,899,169 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr Ambitious View Post
Any stats on what kind of people Chicago is losing? Is it losing lower wage workers and gaining young professionals? Is it the opposite?
There's this...Chicago's Black Population Dwindles, Census Numbers Show

There was a dramatic loss in public housing.
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Old 07-22-2015, 07:15 PM
 
Location: That star on your map in the middle of the East Coast, DMV
3,458 posts, read 2,998,808 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by personone View Post
As someone originally from the Baltimore/DC area who now lives in Chicago, Chicago "feels" larger in every possible way. Not only are the size and feel of the skyscrapers in downtown Chicago larger than Baltimore and DC's put together, but the fact that "Chicagoland" is a connected stretch makes the area a more continuous, large area.

People from Baltimore/DC region know that DC and Baltimore are 2 distinct regions. I-95 or the B-W parkway serve as a connector between the 2 separate regions, but there is no real "fill-in" between the regions.

As far as the difference in population growth between the regions, the numbers don't lie and the growth rate has been much higher for the Baltimore/DC region compared to Chicago. That still doesn't change the fact that Chicago "feels" larger even considering that Baltimore and DC are combining 2 distinct cities to make the comparison.
Meh... That argument is only good for another 10-15 years max. Chicago is undoubtedly more contiguous as it is one whole city/metro. But the DC/Baltimore is much larger of a region than people perceive from the outside. The two city centers not having big skylines doesn't make the region any bigger or smaller than anywhere USA. Cleaveland has more of a skyline than DC and Balt and is smaller than both on every level. DC/Baltimore is honestly writing its own new script for how dual city metros will forever be perceived. There is no metro in this country where you have two top 20 MSA's with their central cities 37 miles apart. Their suburbs really do touch at the end points and in some cases blend together. So to say there is no infill is false, there are just more designated gaps due to land use reasons in between. Laurel, MD, Columbia, MD, and places like Crofton/ Odenton are fully developed suburbs that border each areas MSA.

Chicago period is larger and feels that way. The development is less contiguous between DC/Baltimore than the uniform development of Chicago's midwestern version of urban sprawl, but DC/Balt as a whole CSA expands for so many miles it's not to be underrated. The viewing area for either Washington or Baltimore local news covers at least 4 if not 5 states (Maryland, Virginia, West Virginia, Pennsylvania) and the District of Columbia. (Not sure about Delaware)

The thing that makes this thread worth being a topic is the growth of DC and its suburbs, and that's with only minimal help from Baltimore and its side of the region. This area is not going to stop growing anytime soon and if Baltimore ever picks up only a little I could easily see a 12 million or more CSA in the next couple decades. Chicago on the other hand looks like it's already topped out.
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Old 07-22-2015, 07:21 PM
 
Location: BMORE!
7,245 posts, read 5,534,685 times
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Baltimore and DC, to me, doesn't feel like one region. For that alone, Chicago gets the nod.
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Old 07-22-2015, 07:22 PM
 
Location: Chicago, IL
3,939 posts, read 3,894,489 times
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The reason Chicago feels much larger than DC is because it's an urban area of 9 million people. DC is an urban area of less than 5 million. Cook county is larger than DC's urban area.
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Old 07-22-2015, 07:26 PM
 
Location: That star on your map in the middle of the East Coast, DMV
3,458 posts, read 2,998,808 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kidphilly View Post
DC is absolutely growing faster

I believe Chicago has avery low birth rate relative to many other places and a higher death rate

ther is a thread on the component of change which are interesting

Take a place like Pittsburgh as an example, high death rates and lower birth rates but is increasing the educated class - albeit slow a gross number does not always tell the whole picture, that said DC is attracking more jobs and people no doubt but on this comparison Chicago feels much larger and its not even close

to me Chicago feels closer to LA than it does to DC in size
You realize this the whole DC/Baltimore region we're talking?
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Old 07-22-2015, 07:27 PM
 
Location: That star on your map in the middle of the East Coast, DMV
3,458 posts, read 2,998,808 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chicago South Sider View Post
The reason Chicago feels much larger than DC is because it's an urban area of 9 million people. DC is an urban area of less than 5 million. Cook county is larger than DC's urban area.
Yes but 8 or 9 miles outside of the edges of that DC urban area there is a whole different urban area with another 2.5-3 million.
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Old 07-22-2015, 07:40 PM
 
Location: Washington State desert
4,688 posts, read 2,922,714 times
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This thread is becoming somewhat factual, finally.

Chicago is Chicago.

Baltimore and DC are combined to become nothing close to Chicago, and I don't care the CSA population is greater in WA/BAL. You can't penalize Chicago for not having another big city near it.
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