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View Poll Results: Seattle or Boston?
Boston 59 40.14%
Seattle 88 59.86%
Voters: 147. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 04-16-2015, 03:46 PM
 
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Boston really needs an iconic 1k footer to symbolize the boom it's going under before the boom ends. Based on recent job growth numbers country wide(far lower than it was last year), booms around the country will probably soon be ending as we go under another recession or close to one.
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Old 04-16-2015, 03:57 PM
 
Location: Denver
6,628 posts, read 12,112,091 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ant131531 View Post
Boston really needs an iconic 1k footer to symbolize the boom it's going under before the boom ends. Based on recent job growth numbers country wide(far lower than it was last year), booms around the country will probably soon be ending as we go under another recession or close to one.
Unfortunately it'll be difficult for Boston to ever get a 1,000 foot tower due to Logan Airport. It's great having an airport just minutes from downtown, but unfortunately it means that there's a height limit so as to not interfere with flight patterns and radio. As you can see on this map, a 1,000 ft tower would need to either be in Cambridge (it would be cool if MIT designed a tall tower) or the far end of Back Bay. While it may not get any 1,000 footers, it would be great to see a couple of 800ft towers rise downtown.

Hopefully Boston will continue to boom through creating some home-grown companies (local venture capital in Q4 2014 was the highest since the dot com boom), and enticing other companies to move here (both GE Healthcare is moving to Massachusetts, IBM Watson Health will be headquartered in the area. Several other major pharma & biotech companies are in the midst of major expansions into the area.).

Last edited by tmac9wr; 04-16-2015 at 04:07 PM..
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Old 04-16-2015, 04:08 PM
 
919 posts, read 833,142 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tmac9wr View Post
Seattle is certainly growing at a fantastic rate, but there's a possibility you're underestimating the growth in Boston right now...especially along the waterfront and in Cambridge. Fan Pier/Seaport Square are now well under way and will essentially create a new neighborhood bordering downtown.

We actually had a similar debate before about 9 months ago (see below). Boston has a seen a few things break ground in that time (including 2 400+ fters), but so has Seattle.
Sure, Boston is seeing healthy growth, but Seattle is seeing more growth. Boston has the seaport district that is on fire, but Seattle has SLU, Pike and Pine, and Denny Triangle all of which are also on fire.

Now it is true Seattle has the advantage of having lots of vacant/underbuilt land in their core. But, I would still wager Seattle is building more than Boston.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jpdivola View Post
No doubt Boston is see a healthy amount of construction. But, do you have any statistics to back up your claims that there is more than Seattle? I really don't see how the Boston and Seattle gap will grow in the next 10 years? Seattle seems to be at least keeping pace with Boston's downtown boom, if not exceeding it.

Boston currently has 1 400+ footer under construction, with 7 more approved.
List of tallest buildings in Boston - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Seattle currently has 6 400+ footers under construction, with 9 more approved.
List of tallest buildings in Seattle - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Seattle has delivered 4,471 residential units downtown between Jan 2013 andJune 2014.
As of June, it had:
5,179 residential units under construction downtown.
619 hotel rooms under construction.
3.2 million sq feet of office space in U/C.
and there is tons more in the pipeline.
http://www.downtownseattle.com/files/file/June-2014-Development-Guide-Update-FINAL.pdf

I'm not sure what the comparable figures are for Boston. Trying to think of what has delivered between Jan 13 and June 14?
1) The Victor
2) The Kensington
3) The Dainty Dot replacement
4) The Millenium condo.
5) The Prudential apartment building.
6) A couple places in the Seaport (Waterside Place, 315 A Street)
7) A couple small infill condos in South End.
I don't know the totals, but I would guess these are less than 4,471.

As to what is under construction:
1) One Canal
2) One Greenway.
3) The Jacob Wirth
4) Millennium Tower
5) The Troy (South End)
6) Ink Block
7) The Veridian
8) Boyston West
9) A few buildings in the Seaport (maybe 1,200 units).
Again, don’t know the exact total here. But, seems less than 5,000.

Yeah, Boston has thousands more "just about to break ground”, but so does Seattle. Boston is a great city, and will forever be more urban than Seattle. But on a relative basis, Seattle currently appears to be closing the gap in the core.
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Old 04-16-2015, 04:11 PM
 
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Seriously, PHILADELPHIA is getting a 1k footer before Boston is. Crazy stuff considering Philly isn't a city I associate with economic boom at all.

Yeah, Atlanta just got an announcement today about 900 Health Care Tech jobs coming to Atlanta with an average wage of 109k a year. Bio Tech/Health Care is really booming at the moment so hopefully both cities can continue to seize the opportunities of this lucrative industry.
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Old 04-16-2015, 04:34 PM
 
Location: Denver
6,628 posts, read 12,112,091 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jpdivola View Post
We actually had a similar debate before about 9 months ago (see below). Boston has a seen a few things break ground in that time (including 2 400+ fters), but so has Seattle.
Sure, Boston is seeing healthy growth, but Seattle is seeing more growth. Boston has the seaport district that is on fire, but Seattle has SLU, Pike and Pine, and Denny Triangle all of which are also on fire.

Now it is true Seattle has the advantage of having lots of vacant/underbuilt land in their core. But, I would still wager Seattle is building more than Boston.
Yea I remember that. I would agree that Seattle is likely building more at this point, but I don't think it's outpacing Boston by too much. I think one of the differences is Seattle is developing a lot of totally new places, while a lot of Boston's development is building in/around developed neighborhoods with the exception of the Seaport & NorthPoint. I don't have such an organized group of data that you do...but here's what I can get from Curbed Boston:

Fenway is in the process of adding 2,200 apartments under construction on Boylston St alone.

The city expects to deliver 3,745 hotel rooms by 2018.

These 10 developments alone will add 3,323 apartments to the city this year.

The majority of non-residential construction in the area is related to biotechnology in Cambridge, though the final parcel of the Prudential Center is currently under construction as well. An area which isn't generating much buzz because it's mostly small (less than 50 units) independent projects is South Boston. There is a lot of construction going on there, but since the projects are so small it's difficult to really get a cumulative number.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ant131531 View Post
Seriously, PHILADELPHIA is getting a 1k footer before Boston is. Crazy stuff considering Philly isn't a city I associate with economic boom at all. The

Yeah, Atlanta just got an announcement today about 900 Health Care Tech jobs coming to Atlanta with an average wage of 109k a year. Bio Tech/Health Care is really booming at the moment so hopefully both cities can continue to seize the opportunities of this lucrative industry.
That's great to hear! Yea, hopefully the life science industry continues to boom. That would certainly spell a lot of great things for Boston especially. Remember though, height doesn't necessarily mean a place is more economically successful.
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Old 04-16-2015, 06:19 PM
 
Location: Seattle, WA
2,945 posts, read 3,594,755 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ant131531 View Post
Boston really needs an iconic 1k footer to symbolize the boom it's going under before the boom ends. Based on recent job growth numbers country wide(far lower than it was last year), booms around the country will probably soon be ending as we go under another recession or close to one.
I'm wondering, does the fact that Boston is significantly made of landfill affect the ability for the city to build many high rises due the the instability of the soil? If you look at historic maps of Boston, you'll see that Boston was in fact a small island (what is today Beacon Hill.) Most of Boston today was built upon landfill. Does this soil limit the height of buildings built upon it?
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Old 04-16-2015, 07:14 PM
 
Location: New London
1,671 posts, read 1,737,714 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ant131531 View Post
Seriously, PHILADELPHIA is getting a 1k footer before Boston is. Crazy stuff considering Philly isn't a city I associate with economic boom at all.
Cleveland, Pittsburgh, Indianapolis, and Oklahoma City all have taller buildings than Boston.

Height of skyscrapers doesn't say much about the economic strength of the city.
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Old 04-16-2015, 07:18 PM
 
Location: Denver
6,628 posts, read 12,112,091 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GatsbyGatz View Post
I'm wondering, does the fact that Boston is significantly made of landfill affect the ability for the city to build many high rises due the the instability of the soil? If you look at historic maps of Boston, you'll see that Boston was in fact a small island (what is today Beacon Hill.) Most of Boston today was built upon landfill. Does this soil limit the height of buildings built upon it?
I don't believe so. The largest area of infill was Back Bay, which is home to the city's tallest buildings (rendering of the under construction Four Seasons tower on the right):


Ultimately, the biggest hindrance to tall development are the FAA and NIMBYs. The NIMBYs in Boston are among the most rabid in the nation and they've got a lot of influence unfortunately. They oppose more/less anything proposed over 10 stories, for absurd reasons.
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Old 04-16-2015, 08:50 PM
 
3,580 posts, read 3,664,930 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ant131531 View Post
Seriously, PHILADELPHIA is getting a 1k footer before Boston is. Crazy stuff considering Philly isn't a city I associate with economic boom at all.

Yeah, Atlanta just got an announcement today about 900 Health Care Tech jobs coming to Atlanta with an average wage of 109k a year. Bio Tech/Health Care is really booming at the moment so hopefully both cities can continue to seize the opportunities of this lucrative industry.
The scale of Boston does not lend itself well to a 1,000 foot tower. I think the sweet spot for Boston i the 600-800 foot range.
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Old 04-17-2015, 12:16 AM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
206 posts, read 200,440 times
Reputation: 289
Magnum condom sales are much higher in Seattle.
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