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View Poll Results: DOES DC HAVE MORE IN COMMON WITH NYC OR ATLANTA
NYC 38 36.89%
ATLANTA 65 63.11%
Voters: 103. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 04-25-2015, 01:12 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
Atlanta isn't as culturally and historically unique as NOLA but I certainly wouldn't call it a stereotypical Southern city at all.
It's very much stereotypical of the "New South" that developed after World War II -- transplants, modernist skyscrapers, office parks, suburban sprawl, etc.

 
Old 04-25-2015, 01:47 PM
 
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I would say that DC has more in common with Atlanta. Sure, parts of the District are a little like Brooklyn. But we're comparing metro areas here. The suburbs of DC are nearly indistinguishable from Atlanta's, culturally and visually. The Virginia suburbs are especially similar to Atlanta's.

Culturally speaking, there is nothing like the Bronx or Queens in DC, let alone the working class areas of New Jersey and Long Island. On the flip side, there's no equivalent in DC to the kind Old Money areas like Westchester County, the Upper East Side, and the Hamptons. There are rich people in DC, yes, but it not the multi-generational type one sees in the Northeast.

Lastly, DC is much closer to Atlanta than NYC, in terms of population and population density
 
Old 04-25-2015, 04:01 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Frank Bones View Post
It's very much stereotypical of the "New South" that developed after World War II -- transplants, modernist skyscrapers, office parks, suburban sprawl, etc.
All of the South isn't "New South" though. As a matter of fact, most of it isn't.
 
Old 04-25-2015, 07:07 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
All of the South isn't "New South" though. As a matter of fact, most of it isn't.
That is accurate.
 
Old 04-25-2015, 08:32 PM
 
Location: New Orleans, LA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GRS86 View Post
More like Savannah, Charleston, Mobile, Montgomery.

IMHO, the District itself is more overall similar to NY than it is to Atlanta, even though both the central cores of DC and Atlanta do have neighborhoods that are similar to each other.

As far as the suburbs are concerned, Metro DC and Atlanta are for the most part, mirror images of each other, and are more similar to each other than Suburban DC is to NY!!
I guess by city I was referring to major metro areas on the same scale as ATL. Like Memphis, Dallas, Houston, OKC, Birmingham ... I think ATL has (much) more in common with those cities than DC or NYC from my view. Weather, architecture, city planning (with a few exceptions between them), attitude of people... they all seem the pretty standard across the south with the large metros, sans New Orleans, Miami, Orlando, San Antonio, Austin ...
 
Old 04-27-2015, 12:27 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mwahfromtheheart View Post
I guess by city I was referring to major metro areas on the same scale as ATL. Like Memphis, Dallas, Houston, OKC, Birmingham ... I think ATL has (much) more in common with those cities than DC or NYC from my view. Weather, architecture, city planning (with a few exceptions between them), attitude of people... they all seem the pretty standard across the south with the large metros, sans New Orleans, Miami, Orlando, San Antonio, Austin ...
Memphis, OKC, and Birmingham are not on the same scale as Atlanta, Dallas, or Houston - not even close. You are comparing 3 cities with populations of around 1.3 million to 3 cities with populations of wel over 5 million. Those aren't anywhere near the same scale.

What stands out to you about Miami, Orlando, etc. that is vastly different from Houston, Atlanta, and Dallas? They are all diverse, exciting large cities with lots of transplants that have been growing and booming for decades (except for New Orleans).
 
Old 04-28-2015, 12:42 PM
 
Location: Atlanta ,GA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mwahfromtheheart View Post
There's really nothing like NYC. And there's nowhere like DC in the USA either. One city is the iconic USA city known around the world by culturalists, historians, etc etc, DC is the nations capital, Atlanta is a pretty stereotypical USA city (especially for the south). How do you begin to compare any of these?
How is Atlanta a "stereotypical" Southern city?
Especially due to its size,influence,built environment and diversity is so much more than most Southern cities
 
Old 04-28-2015, 12:48 PM
 
Location: Atlanta ,GA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Frank Bones View Post
It's very much stereotypical of the "New South" that developed after World War II -- transplants, modernist skyscrapers, office parks, suburban sprawl, etc.
The "New South" term came from Atlanta.It was the term used by city leaders to grow its reputation and status.Any cities that developed with that term in mind are copies not original.

The Modernist skycrapers,suburban sprawl and office parks are not located "downtown" or in the city core.Its not like those things cannot also be found in growing cities like D.C.
People forget Atlanta has a core that is like typical cities found up and down the East Coast.
 
Old 04-28-2015, 12:52 PM
 
6,612 posts, read 6,552,085 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by afonega1 View Post
The "New South" term came from Atlanta.It was the term used by city leaders to grow its reputation and status.Any cities that developed with that term in mind are copies not original.

The Modernist skycrapers,suburban sprawl and office parks are not located "downtown" or in the city core.Its not like those things cannot also be found in growing cities like D.C.
People forget Atlanta has a core that is like typical cities found up and down the East Coast.
It's so crazy for people to assume that all of Atlanta is like the suburbs of Atlanta. I don't know of any other city that gets that from anyone - even though they all have massive suburbia surrounding them.
 
Old 04-28-2015, 05:44 PM
 
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Definitely Atlanta.
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