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View Poll Results: DOES DC HAVE MORE IN COMMON WITH NYC OR ATLANTA
NYC 38 36.89%
ATLANTA 65 63.11%
Voters: 103. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 04-28-2015, 07:53 PM
 
Location: Prince George's County, Maryland
6,212 posts, read 7,368,134 times
Reputation: 2581

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Quote:
Originally Posted by 80s_kid View Post
LOL. This is a weird comparison. Atlanta's only comparisons with DC is that is that they dominate their region and they are top notch cities for Blacks....The city of DC is more like NYC and the suburbs are more like ATL. Culturally, DC isn't like either to me, it's Mid-Atlantic.
This. And even then, some of the suburbs here are still different from ATL's.

Built environment-wise, definitely more like New York than ATL but overall, DC's built form is more in line with Philly and Baltimore though Downtown DC does look like Midtown Manhattan with a buzzcut.

 
Old 04-28-2015, 07:53 PM
 
Location: Atlanta ,GA
9,086 posts, read 13,263,665 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DistrictSonic View Post
Because Atlanta itself has the density of suburbia, it's just one big suburb, something DC definitely is not.

coutesy of Tony Rhinehart
Ormewood Park / Glenwood Park - Atlanta Real Estate - Midtown, Milton, Roswell, Buckhead


Funny .Sure does not look like a suburb to me.Also looks very walk able seeing how people in the pictures are walking.

Last edited by afonega1; 04-28-2015 at 08:36 PM..
 
Old 04-28-2015, 10:05 PM
 
Location: That star on your map in the middle of the East Coast, DMV
3,947 posts, read 3,427,988 times
Reputation: 2427
^^^^ lol bruh who you fooling? You cherry picked the only two examples of a city radius of 130 sq miles to claim its urbanity is legitimate? DC has suburbs that are more urban than that.
 
Old 04-28-2015, 10:20 PM
 
6,816 posts, read 6,929,896 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the resident09 View Post
^^^^ lol bruh who you fooling? You cherry picked the only two examples of a city radius of 130 sq miles to claim its urbanity is legitimate? DC has suburbs that are more urban than that.
There plenty of walkable neighborhoods in Atlanta: Midtown, Atlantic Station, Westside, Inman Park, Little Five Points, Glenwood Park, East Atlanta, Atkins Park.
 
Old 04-28-2015, 10:22 PM
 
6,816 posts, read 6,929,896 times
Reputation: 5486
The gap between Atlanta and DC is much closer than the gap between DC and NYC. That's why Atlanta has more votes. DC residents acting like D.C. is NYC or SF. It's not.
 
Old 04-28-2015, 11:01 PM
 
Location: Atlanta ,GA
9,086 posts, read 13,263,665 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the resident09 View Post
^^^^ lol bruh who you fooling? You cherry picked the only two examples of a city radius of 130 sq miles to claim its urbanity is legitimate? DC has suburbs that are more urban than that.
I NEVER claimed Atlanta was like D.C. in urbn density.However what are you talking about to claim if its urbanity is legitimate?Just ask the real estate agents,the buyers and the types of retailers that are in some areas versus other areas,
They are the first clue that there is a level of urbanity regardless if it is less or more than any part of any city of D.C..Urbanity does not begin or end with D.C.
Hong Kong makes D.C. look like Oklahoma City in urban density.

If you read what I responded to,then there s no question what I said was valid.
After you read what I responded to THEN get back at me with your comments.

Also if you think those are the only TWO examples then you can't possibly know what you are talking about when it comes to Atlanta.
Especially when there is something called the Beltline where neighborhoods have now and are popping up along its routes.

Last edited by afonega1; 04-28-2015 at 11:13 PM..
 
Old 04-28-2015, 11:03 PM
 
Location: Atlanta ,GA
9,086 posts, read 13,263,665 times
Reputation: 2929
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ant131531 View Post
The gap between Atlanta and DC is much closer than the gap between DC and NYC. That's why Atlanta has more votes. DC residents acting like D.C. is NYC or SF. It's not.
Exactly.Its not like this thread was based on D.C. and Atlanta being just alike.They are not but the too are closer than the New York and D.C.
 
Old 04-29-2015, 06:49 AM
 
Location: Prince George's County, Maryland
6,212 posts, read 7,368,134 times
Reputation: 2581
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ant131531 View Post
The gap between Atlanta and DC is much closer than the gap between DC and NYC. That's why Atlanta has more votes. DC residents acting like D.C. is NYC or SF. It's not.
It's not but it's still closer to those two including Philly on the urbanity front. Can't really say the same for ATL though. It is what it is.
 
Old 04-29-2015, 06:53 AM
 
Location: Prince George's County, Maryland
6,212 posts, read 7,368,134 times
Reputation: 2581
Quote:
Originally Posted by the resident09 View Post
^^^^ lol bruh who you fooling? You cherry picked the only two examples of a city radius of 130 sq miles to claim its urbanity is legitimate? DC has suburbs that are more urban than that.
Exactly. Quite a sizeable chunk of Atlanta would be considered the 'burbs up here, especially when taking into account its geographic size.
 
Old 04-29-2015, 08:09 AM
 
275 posts, read 314,420 times
Reputation: 302
You can just look at their histories and be able answer this question.

DC's metro area grew up alongside Atlanta. Both cities expanded almost entirely in the twentieth century.

In 1860, DC had 75,000 people. It's streets were still mostly unpaved. New York had 1.2 million already.

Until recently, DC was unquestionably "Southern." Like Atlanta, DC enforced legal segregation until the 1960's (that's only fifty years ago). Slavery existed in DC until 1865, just like Atlanta. This matters because DC's demographics still reflect this past. There's a reason why DC became known as the Chocolate City. The demographics of DC are nearly indistinguishable from Atlanta's. DC has never been the multi-ethnic city that New York has been.

The only reason that DC does not look more like Atlanta is that its metro area absorbed two colonial-era towns (Georgetown and Alexandria) and it had the foresight to construct a more thorough mass-transit system (the Metro), which has helped limit some of the sprawl there.

I grant you that DC is increasingly becoming more like New York.
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