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Old 04-21-2015, 03:11 PM
 
11,158 posts, read 22,306,273 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kidphilly View Post
The census report showed about 20K people added from 2000 to 2010

Based on the census release Chicago led all in add during this time

Then I think Manhattan (DT which they consider Lower Manhattan)
Philly
DC
SF

the next 4 after Chicago were close on absolute adds in the 20K range. I believe Chicago was like 50% greater during the time period in absolute adds

need to track down the link but think am pretty accurate on the numbers
Yeah, if you looked at within 2 miles of downtown based on that census report:

Gains from 2000 to 2010:

Chicago: 48,288
New York: 37,422
Philly: 20,769
San Fran: 19,712
DC: 19,502
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Old 04-21-2015, 03:14 PM
 
Location: The City
22,309 posts, read 32,051,775 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chicago60614 View Post
Yeah, if you looked at within 2 miles of downtown based on that census report:

Gains from 2000 to 2010:

Chicago: 48,288
New York: 37,422
Philly: 20,769
San Fran: 19,712
DC: 19,502
yes that is it Had Manhattan wrong and was light for Chicago

the Chicago numbers are really impressive

Think DC will have even more growth

Good news is many centers are growing in this context - Philly at the current will surpass the growth last decade if it keeps up. There are not as many redevelopment areas as in Chicago or even DC so don't think will see that growth, maybe ever in the core
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Old 04-21-2015, 03:17 PM
 
9,830 posts, read 11,395,810 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chicago60614 View Post
Yeah, if you looked at within 2 miles of downtown based on that census report:

Gains from 2000 to 2010:

Chicago: 48,288
New York: 37,422
Philly: 20,769
San Fran: 19,712
DC: 19,502

I wonder if D.C. will lead all cities from 2010-2020 in population gains in the 2 miles from downtown area?
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Old 04-21-2015, 03:18 PM
 
Location: East Central Pennsylvania/ Chicago for 6yrs.
2,539 posts, read 2,452,554 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gwillyfromphilly View Post
How are you defining downtown Chicago because if your going by the info I provided then you are wrong.
Again this City of Chicago web sight. Defines its Downtown Boundaries.

http://www.cityofchicago.org/city/en/depts/doit/dataset/boundaries_-_centralbusinessdistrict.html

The Census counts Downtowns as within 2 miles of its City Hall.

Again... this area begins at the OFFICIAL END ....OF DOWNTOWN CHICAGO.
I SAY AT LEAST TO.... LINCOLN PARK IN THE CENTER? SHOULD BE INCLUDED TODAY



THIS PICTURE SHOWS NEAR NORTH PART OF DOWNTOWN VIRTUALLY ALL RESIDENTIAL LIKE THE ABOVE PICTURE YOU SEE IN THE DISTANCE BELOW ⤵

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Old 04-21-2015, 03:20 PM
 
Location: Not where you ever lived
11,544 posts, read 25,921,872 times
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You are probably right about the downtown area, but what you don't understand until you live in both a couple of years, is the vast difference between the Midwest and either coast.

The Chicago downtown has always been about business since I a little child. It is not like Manhattan. Chicago has a diverse public transportation system that includes rail, bus, cab, water taxi, limo, auto, zip car, and bicycle. It is one of the reasons folks in the city do not need to own a car..

I don't know where the city would add light rail. The current project is a rail from Chicago to Champaign primarily so the Chicago students at the flagship university can return home quicker - but the only way to do it is to not make any stops between the two cities. Normal would be the exception as it has the other large university, and the second busiest Amtrak depot in Illinois.

Quote:
Originally Posted by gwillyfromphilly View Post
It doesn't take anything away from Chicago. all it means is that Philly has a larger downtown than Chicago.

As far as transportation is concerned, I would give the edge to Chicago but I will say that Philly has better inter-city rail, light rail, and 24-hr service options.
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Old 04-21-2015, 03:32 PM
 
Location: Boston Metrowest (via the Philly area)
4,434 posts, read 7,494,522 times
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The fundamental point of contention here is that Chicago and Philadelphia are just two different cities in terms of their structure/layout. It comes as no surprise that there would be a debate about how to measure "downtowns," since it really does not lend to an apples-apples comparison

The point of Chicago having a larger downtown in terms of commercial activity is clear. It has an obviously more robust business district, more restaurants, more stores, etc. I don't think anyone is debating this.

Of course, being a much older city, Philadelphia is essentially based on a more "European" model where people have long lived very close (either above their own business, or within walking distance) to where they work. Hence, its residential population has always been more intertwined with its downtown. And so, you have this paradox where Philadelphia may indeed (depending on how its defined) have a larger population among its downtown area, despite having a smaller business district.

This is not to take away from the grandiosity of Chicago. I don't think this type of study will change the fact that it's seen as America's "second city" as far as urban centers are concerned, but it's nevertheless interesting to see how an older post-industrial urban center like Philadelphia has increased its population continuing on the more human-scaled, intensely mixed-use model, with little distinction between commercial and residential, that it has long had.

Last edited by Duderino; 04-21-2015 at 03:42 PM..
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Old 04-21-2015, 03:36 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,182 posts, read 26,121,294 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by steeps View Post
Again this City of Chicago web sight. Defines its Downtown Boundaries.

http://www.cityofchicago.org/city/en/depts/doit/dataset/boundaries_-_centralbusinessdistrict.html

The Census counts Downtowns as within 2 miles of its City Hall.

Again... this area begins at the OFFICIAL END ....OF DOWNTOWN CHICAGO.
I SAY AT LEAST TO.... LINCOLN PARK IN THE CENTER? SHOULD BE INCLUDED TODAY



THIS PICTURE SHOWS NEAR NORTH PART OF DOWNTOWN VIRTUALLY ALL RESIDENTIAL LIKE THE ABOVE PICTURE YOU SEE IN THE DISTANCE BELOW ⤵
What's the dark tower to the very far right in your last photo?
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Old 04-21-2015, 03:41 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia, PA
183 posts, read 174,434 times
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No matter what, Philly will always be better than Chicago in walkability, transportation, food, culture, music, arts, and friendliness. Philly has a better library and public health system too.
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Old 04-21-2015, 03:57 PM
 
11,158 posts, read 22,306,273 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
What's the dark tower to the very far right in your last photo?
Lakepoint Tower. The only highrise that somehow got permission to build right along the lake and east of Lakeshore Drive.
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Old 04-21-2015, 04:05 PM
 
104 posts, read 97,310 times
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If you count the residential areas adjacent to Downtown SF (Tenderloin, Nob Hill, Chinatown, North Beach, etc.) it surpasses 200,000 in an area smaller than what you're calling Downtown Philadelphia.

This thread is comparing apples and oranges and is not really valid.
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