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Old 06-21-2017, 05:10 PM
 
Location: Center City, Philadelphia
4,562 posts, read 2,532,928 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Justabystander View Post
Nobody's jealous of something that is made up.
https://www.census.gov/newsroom/rele.../cb12-181.html

Downtown area defined as an area within a two-mile radius of their City's Largest City Hall

Like it or not, it is not made up. It is pretty funny though
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Old 06-21-2017, 08:17 PM
 
9,701 posts, read 6,701,737 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thedirtypirate View Post
Like it or not, it is not made up. It is pretty funny though
No, it is made up. Your link doesn't show anything relevant to the conversation.

Again, the Census has no "downtown" definition. The fact that there's a one-off report on a random subject doesn't mean it's a Census category.
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Old 06-21-2017, 08:46 PM
 
3,633 posts, read 2,047,521 times
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Of course the premise of the thread is total BS. This keeps coming back because people keep going back to something that's been discredited.
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Old 06-21-2017, 09:08 PM
 
Location: Center City, Philadelphia
4,562 posts, read 2,532,928 times
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So the only analysis the Census Bureau has done on downtown populations is BS according to the City Data faithful because they do not agree with the methodology. You can find plenty of Chicago Publications and even threads on the Chicago forum cheering these numbers. No one is saying or thinks Philadelphia offers more of a big city atmosphere. It is, what it is. It isn't 'made up' or 'discredited'. It makes no sense to say "it isn't a category of the Census" when it clearly states that it's a special report measuring different population densities. It the table of interest is on page 38 table 3.7. It's a silly abitrary statistic. That's all.
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Old 06-21-2017, 09:11 PM
 
2,347 posts, read 1,084,969 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thedirtypirate View Post
https://www.census.gov/newsroom/rele.../cb12-181.html

Downtown area defined as an area within a two-mile radius of their City's Largest City Hall

Like it or not, it is not made up. It is pretty funny though
The US census uses a 2-mile radius standard for every large city. Not the city's claimed CBD boundaries.
But I say let the 2020 census have this thread resurrected. ? If Philly might claim something similar? I give credit to Chicago for evolving a core from a---> very low live in population 30-40 years ago. To the fastest growing US core in last decade alone by US census data.

Chicago once had Philly posters claim its disconnect of Chicago's core from its neighborhoods in past years. But much of that has changed. The northwest part of the core. Took abandoned warehouses and turned them to high-end loft-living today. Then filling in more in new high-rise and skyscraper living. River North is fully established as part of Chicago's CBD. Having much of its nightlife too.
Then now .... the West of the Loop meatpacking former warehousing has became Prime Loft-living today ***(see picture below).

Whole new neighborhoods established over and by air-rights over rail-beds North and South of its downtown Parks. Philly just starting their - over rails Schuylkill Yards by air-rights new development example in the works and a great idea.
Just west of the Loop was also warehousing for meat-packing. That are is hot in lofts now and fast growing from NO RESIDENTS. The areas south of the Loop ** (see picture below) have been filling in with new town-housing and high-rise living with former industrial tracks along the river. Getting acres of new development as one tract alone as 62 acres and will then connect the Loop to Chinatown.

Despite a lose overall of population of Chicago. The core is booming and closing its disconnect to oldest neighborhoods. Philly's ---> core was ALWAYS SOLID RESIDENTIAL. Chicago had merely to its north of downtown, continuous for most of its history. But that has changed.

*I do not knock Philly's core population and gentrification. But demographics and wealth in Professionals re-claiming it has changed. But it all was always residential. Chicago ----> had to Create this new surging population virtually from scratch. When just the Loop alone as downtown was the core, Chicago had very little residential live-in population. That has Skyrocketed.

As I said once before here....... in Chicago's 2-miles from its City Hall is Grant Park, Millennium Park, New Maggie Daley Park and Monroe Harbor in Lake Michigan ..... Just how it goes..... with its 2-mile radius ***(see picture below) with Parks and a Harbor. For Philly.... it is then Center City plus a Greater CC and continuous.

Chicago's front Parks
w/Harbor in its 2-mi/West Loop Lofts /S Loop last tract green 62-acre to Chinatown

Last edited by DavePa; 05-01-2018 at 08:15 AM..
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Old 06-22-2017, 11:42 AM
 
Location: The City
21,966 posts, read 30,873,769 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mhays25 View Post
Of course the premise of the thread is total BS. This keeps coming back because people keep going back to something that's been discredited.


it is but one metric


There was a report on population within 1 mile of the main train station in a report as well


like most metrics there is no way to perfectly compare such things so at times these metrics get applied to look to apply some assemblance of consistency albeit having caveats in some form no matter the metric


Philly does absolutely have one of the largest most concentrated residential populations close to the DT/core etc that has never been a downfall its biggest weaknesses are really more on DT jobs (could use more and more office space) and shopping if anything not population in the DT
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Old 06-22-2017, 12:45 PM
 
85 posts, read 45,149 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by philly fighter View Post
im new to this but im shocked that philly passed chicago and manhattan in population thats amazing and philly is growing still and faster then evr since that economy boost in early 2015 also its been getting more skyscraper projects approved then ever befor usually 1 gets approved yearly now theres like 10-20 yearly throughout the city
Philadelphia is still an affordable place to live out of the major east coast cities. Outside of Center City, the rent is very affordable. Under $2,000 rent you can live in a nice spacious apartment in in a good area like Fox Chase. In NYC under $2,000 will probably be a rat infested area. NYC is overcrowded with non livable salaries to survive. Even with $100K you are considered poor in NYC. Also Philadelphia is a college town, lots of young people live here and the city takes care of their college kids. They can graduate from any top Philadelphia school and find a decent job in Philly.
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Old 06-22-2017, 12:45 PM
 
11,024 posts, read 21,612,905 times
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What populations are we talking about?

Chicago's population of the downtown area, essentially areas within 1-2 miles of city hall, in the highrise district that any normal person would say was "downtown" has grown quite a bit:

Per the census bureau using census tracts:
2000: 151,628
2010: 195,836 (+44,208)
2015: 238,259 (+42,423)

+57% growth in 15 years.
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Old 06-22-2017, 12:52 PM
 
85 posts, read 45,149 times
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Overpriced housing is destroying NYC, Chicago, SF. When the economy crashed, people went to the cities and then rent became out of control.
I just hope Philly does not get affected by it, the largest Fortune 500 company is Comcast and they have horribly run customer service.
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Old 06-22-2017, 02:49 PM
 
2,347 posts, read 1,084,969 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scarlet Witch View Post
Overpriced housing is destroying NYC, Chicago, SF. When the economy crashed, people went to the cities and then rent became out of control.
I just hope Philly does not get affected by it, the largest Fortune 500 company is Comcast and they have horribly run customer service.
Chicago's problem is taxes primarily. The city operates like its debt is not there. It maintains its street-sweeping services in every neighborhood. It builds projects with promoting tourism in mind seen as very lucrative for the city by $'s spent to maintain vibrancy and growth by it. Unlike Philly .... Chicago has little in Historic attractions there no matter what. So it actually built attractions that became a lure to bring tourist and enhance living in its core.

Housing stock is different too. But I won't go into there. As for the cost between the Cores of these cities? Chicago may average more and in Taxes. But averages can be skewed by Chicago having much more in high-end high-rise and Skyscraper living. But also a large Loft living population due to warehousing areas in the core conversions including old early skyscrapers.

CC Philly is surely up there in cost and rents now too. But putting Chicago in SF and NYC's cost level is just not even close. Especially in overall size of residences. Chicago has no rent control or lotteries for lower rents

https://assets.dnainfo.com/chicago_p...1453849170.png

2016 median rents in Chicago for a one-bedroom. Heart of downtown Near North, Loop and Near West areas are past the $2000 mark. But neighborhoods right next door still have median rents under $2000.
examples Highly desirable.

Early 2016 prices were up but thousands of new apartments were scheduled to come on the market through the year and drops were expected. Not sure if it materialized?

North of the Core neighborhoods

- Lincoln Park - $1,670
- Lake View - $1,300

Just south and west of the Loop

- South Loop - $1,770
- West Town - $1,820

One striking difference between Chicago and Philly is in the kind of housing offered. As Philly has quaint very old colonial areas in CC. Chicago does not. Then comparing neighborhood housing outside of the Cores too?

As I said, the housing between the cities in near Core neighborhoods all has STARK DIFFERENCES. But I won't go there as it is what it is and interiors can be whatever you make of it anyway.

I also believe Chicago still has a ordinance? That all rentals MUST have a window access in every room and no basement ones. The city grew much more unattached in housing that way.

Chicago still did not attain to pre-crash housing values overall (though core areas skyrocketed) and if anything destroys and effects home buying and selling to move because of...... its taxes over actual home prices and Public schools.
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