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Old 04-24-2015, 06:33 PM
 
1,353 posts, read 1,205,092 times
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Oh, and RE: racial tension, having lived in hot southern states before, you'll experience FAR MORE of that in the south. I think it's the combination of heat + more races living next to and amongst each other + just more of the minority groups that are at the center of tensions.

Living in New York or CA is like living in a privileged bubble (of course depending on where). At your income, you can choose to live in the most prestigious, advanced bubbles of people in the world, which are to be found in Manhattan and possibly San Francisco. Boston and DC getting there, too. If America's baggage is a concern, why give yourself the opportunity to be exposed? New York is one of the safest cities in America, one of the most diverse, and certainly the most cosmopolitan. You can afford a condo in Manhattan at that income. You can live and be in the center of the universe and arguably the most important, global city in the world. Most people put themselves in $260K of student debt to go live in Manhattan. You're being paid $260K to go live there. Take them up on their offer.

If you can stand high pressure work environments where people are all type A/ambitious, constant noise and commotion of a super dense big city like that (believe me - Skandinavia is quaint comparably), and an intense work hard/play hard go go go lifestyle, then NYC is tops in America and only a few other cities even come close (at MUCH smaller scale). You might get grey hairs early, though, but you'll be able to afford rock star salons and high end coloring with your salary
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Old 04-24-2015, 06:34 PM
 
Location: Houston
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$220K in Houston! You'll be living like a king here.

But I think I'd live in NYC for a few years and then transfer to Houston.
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Old 04-24-2015, 06:40 PM
 
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^^^$40K gap in pay is large enough where I bet the OP nets roughly the same in either metro (if this were $100K in NYC or $60K in Houston, the answer would be Houston, I think...depending on whether the guy was 23 or 30 - I'd hate to be 30 and only making $100K in NYC, but that's just me). It'll take a couple years to build that down payment. But you're right - that down payment will get you a 3-4 BR home in a gated community in Houston on an estate sized lot, while it may get you a 1+ BR in Manhattan.

Still, a single European guy is likely to come at this from a different mentality than a typical American. A nicely located [quiet] 1+ BR 1.5 BA condo in Manhattan with good furniture, perhaps a view, and access to that amount of world class amenities within a 20 minute walk is probably deemed more desirable than a stucco faux-mediterranean mansion surrounded by families and mom SUVs.

Just my take. Nothing against Houston, but this is one of those "finances is no obstacle" questions with New York City as an option versus a very average suburban American metropolis.

The OP is a single, presumably handsome European male. There is just no argument here. NYC and case closed.
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Old 04-24-2015, 06:44 PM
 
Location: Houston
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gwillyfromphilly View Post
Actually compared to its peers (NYC, Los Angeles, Chicago, Philadelphia) Houston does not offer anywhere near the level of amenities when compared to the largest major cities in America. San Antonio, TX is technically is the 7th largest city but do you honestly think it offers more than places San Francisco or Washington DC simply because of its larger land areas?
You can still enjoy living in a city that doesn't have as many amenities as NYC, LA, and Chicago. Houston has plenty to satisfy those who enjoy getting out and having a good time. We have parks, museums, theaters, restaurants, bars, clubs, shopping, lakes/the bay/the gulf, golfing, and a ton of other things. Greater Houston has over 6 million people so of course there is a demand to entertain them. Even San Antonio has a lot to offer. Not as much as NYC, LA, and Chicago but that doesn't make them boring cities. Who really goes out and experiences every amenity their city has to offer? Even if I lived in one of those top 3 cities I doubt I would do everything they offered due to time and just not being interested in a lot of them. I can't imagine any city in the top 10 lacking amenities to bore most people. Probably not even any cities in the top 20. Most people probably only do half or less of the things their cities have to offer and travel to other cities to enjoy their amenities when they are on vacation. Day to day people are just working and getting out to enjoy bars/clubs/restaurants after work and doing outdoor park/museum/zoo/theater stuff on the weekends.
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Old 04-24-2015, 06:50 PM
 
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^^^This is true. And honestly, cities like NYC can be overwhelming from an option perspective. It's the ironic situation where you have so many options you can't choose and you end up doing nothing.

But champagne problems.
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Old 04-24-2015, 06:57 PM
 
Location: Vineland, NJ
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Quote:
Originally Posted by westhou View Post
You can still enjoy living in a city that doesn't have as many amenities as NYC, LA, and Chicago. Houston has plenty to satisfy those who enjoy getting out and having a good time. We have parks, museums, theaters, restaurants, bars, clubs, shopping, lakes/the bay/the gulf, golfing, and a ton of other things. Greater Houston has over 6 million people so of course there is a demand to entertain them. Even San Antonio has a lot to offer. Not as much as NYC, LA, and Chicago but that doesn't make them boring cities. Who really goes out and experiences every amenity their city has to offer? Even if I lived in one of those top 3 cities I doubt I would do everything they offered due to time and just not being interested in a lot of them. I can't imagine any city in the top 10 lacking amenities to bore most people. Probably not even any cities in the top 20. Most people probably only do half or less of the things their cities have to offer and travel to other cities to enjoy their amenities when they are on vacation. Day to day people are just working and getting out to enjoy bars/clubs/restaurants after work and doing outdoor park/museum/zoo/theater stuff on the weekends.
Of course you can still enjoy living in Houston but that fact remains that it falls terribly behind those others cities when it comes to amenities. Houston's city infrastructure alone is proof that it's not on the same tier as those other cities. More people does not equal a better city. As I said before, Houston is certainly the cheaper city but you won't get the same level amenities as you would in NYC. It's arguably the least urban big city in North America. If the OP wants to live a more suburban style lifestyle that Houston would be the obvious choice but if he wants to live a city that offers plenty of urban amenities than NYC is the clear choice.
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Old 04-24-2015, 07:18 PM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
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Interesting how you threw Philadelphia in there along with LA, Chicago, and New York. Philadelphia doesn't offer much more than Houston other than an urban environment. But I digress.
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Old 04-24-2015, 07:23 PM
 
Location: Houston
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gwillyfromphilly View Post
Of course you can still enjoy living in Houston but that fact remains that it falls terribly behind those others cities when it comes to amenities. Houston's city infrastructure alone is proof that it's not on the same tier as those other cities. More people does not equal a better city. As I said before, Houston is certainly the cheaper city but you won't get the same level amenities as you would in NYC. It's arguably the least urban big city in North America. If the OP wants to live a more suburban style lifestyle that Houston would be the obvious choice but if he wants to live a city that offers plenty of urban amenities than NYC is the clear choice.
The way you describe Houston makes it seem like there is something wrong with it. I've lived here over 20 years. The first half of that was in the suburbs (Cypress) and the second half in the city (Uptown). I've never felt like I've lacked anything. I live within walking distance of some of the best restaurants in the country and some of the best shopping in the country. I'm within a 10-15 minute drive from one of the largest theater districts in the country, some of the best museums in the country, and one of the largest urban parks in the country. I've traveled all over the country and of course I know NYC, LA, and Chicago offer more but that doesn't make me feel any less about living in Houston or that I'm missing out.

I know that more people doesn't equal better but I do know that any city with over a million people is going to offer more than I'll ever be able to need. That also includes most cities over 500,000 and a lot of other smaller cities.

Houston has several urban districts and those wishing to experience the international/dynamic/cultural live in those districts (Downtown, Uptown, Midtown, Upper Kirby) and those wanting a quieter life live in the quieter districts (River Oaks, West University, The Heights) in Houston. The urban parts of Houston don't compare to NYC, LA, and Chicago but it does offer those living in those districts more than enough amenities to enjoy.

Houston is not perfect but it does provide a great place to live, work, and play for over 6 million people. We all don't just work and go home everyday with nothing to do. A day out in Houston isn't a meal at The Olive Garden, shopping at Walmart, and going to the movies to see an Adam Sandler movie . Not that there's anything wrong with that but for those who think Houston is just a big suburb your not really giving Houston it's due credit.

NYC is my favorite city in the country and I would never try to put Houston in the same category with it and I wouldn't put it with LA or Chicago either. But it still offers a lot and shouldn't be seen as some big suburb with little to offer.

I just ask that you open your mind a bit and consider that Houston is more than what you may think it is. Of course you don't have to believe a word I'm saying but I'm just speaking from my experience from living here.
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Old 04-24-2015, 07:43 PM
 
Location: The Dirty South.
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Gwilly we had this discussion before. Why do you always downplay Texas cities?
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Old 04-24-2015, 07:48 PM
 
Location: Nashville TN
4,925 posts, read 4,874,139 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gwillyfromphilly View Post
Actually compared to its peers (NYC, Los Angeles, Chicago, Philadelphia) Houston does not offer anywhere near the level of amenities when compared to the largest major cities in America. San Antonio, TX is technically is the 7th largest city but do you honestly think it offers more than places San Francisco or Washington DC simply because of its larger land areas?
I agree, Houston is a fourth largest city in the country in population but I do agree its nothing like the East Coast in terms of city living and amenities. Houston is very corporate and car centric and spread out. It is very hard to be able to get around without a car. Houston's bar scene was too spread out with bars and clubs every which way which made it hard for me to keep up with friends I was visiting in town. Despite that the people are super friendly and more welcoming than the East Coast, its easier to talk to women in Texas than the East Coast thou. Every place has its pro's and con's
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