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View Poll Results: What city/metro would you rather live in?
MSP 60 60.00%
PDX 40 40.00%
Voters: 100. You may not vote on this poll

 
 
Old 05-15-2015, 09:44 PM
 
Location: Orlandooooooo
2,363 posts, read 4,256,236 times
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Tough one. Portland though. Too cold in Minneapolis for me.
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Old 05-16-2015, 10:35 AM
 
6,795 posts, read 6,588,241 times
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Why do people talk about the twin cities like they're apart of one large urban walkable core LOL? They separated by low density sprawl at least by 10-12 miles.
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Old 05-16-2015, 10:41 AM
 
1,049 posts, read 1,760,673 times
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Originally Posted by Ant131531 View Post
Why do people talk about the twin cities like they're apart of one large urban walkable core LOL? They separated by low density sprawl at least by 10-12 miles.
Well. The twin cities then follow the recommended model of having multiple cores. The twin cities also have a couple of very large cores too. I'm in love with he density of that metro area. Only a few in America can say they've matched, pound for pound.
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Old 05-16-2015, 10:47 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis
2,533 posts, read 2,382,712 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ant131531 View Post
Why do people talk about the twin cities like they're apart of one large urban walkable core LOL? They separated by low density sprawl at least by 10-12 miles.
You've obviously never been here. There is no "sprawl" between the two cities. The two downtowns are about ten miles apart. However, the neighborhoods between the two downtowns are contiguous and very densely populated. Unless they look at street signs, most visitors have no idea when they have crossed from one city into the other.
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Old 05-16-2015, 11:31 AM
 
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No they are not, because then you'd be talking about an urban core as large as NYC. Minneapolis's urban core is not 12 miles wide.

No urban, dense, walkable core is 12 mile long in this country except NYC. It's a bunch of a single family homes between Downtown Minn. and Downtown St Paul. Unless there a streetwall of apartment midrises or rowhouses, it's not an urban core to me.
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Old 05-16-2015, 11:54 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis
2,533 posts, read 2,382,712 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ant131531 View Post
No they are not, because then you'd be talking about an urban core as large as NYC. Minneapolis's urban core is not 12 miles wide.

No urban, dense, walkable core is 12 mile long in this country except NYC. It's a bunch of a single family homes between Downtown Minn. and Downtown St Paul. Unless there a streetwall of apartment midrises or rowhouses, it's not an urban core to me.
No one is arguing that Minneapolis has the population density of NYC. The point is that Minneapolis and St Paul are contiguous and fully-urbanized. In fact the area between the two downtowns is the most densely populated portion of the metro area.

You come and walk it (or take LRT), then get back to those of us who actually live here with pictures of the "sprawl" you find.
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Old 05-16-2015, 06:02 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis
1,704 posts, read 2,626,829 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ant131531 View Post
No they are not, because then you'd be talking about an urban core as large as NYC. Minneapolis's urban core is not 12 miles wide.

No urban, dense, walkable core is 12 mile long in this country except NYC. It's a bunch of a single family homes between Downtown Minn. and Downtown St Paul. Unless there a streetwall of apartment midrises or rowhouses, it's not an urban core to me.
But you said they were separated by "low density sprawl." There is zero sprawl anywhere between downtown St. Paul and downtown Minneapolis and the entire area is moderate to very high density. What area are you trying to refer to even?
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Old 05-16-2015, 09:04 PM
 
Location: Carver County, MN
1,395 posts, read 2,069,542 times
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Originally Posted by steel03 View Post
But you said they were separated by "low density sprawl." There is zero sprawl anywhere between downtown St. Paul and downtown Minneapolis and the entire area is moderate to very high density. What area are you trying to refer to even?

True. The east neighborhoods of Minneapolis and western neighborhoods of St. Paul were all pretty much built out prior to WWII. Many had street cars and while some neighborhoods feature large areas of single family homes they are closer together, integrated with businesses and institutions and follow a tight grid pattern- the opposite of low density suburban sprawl.
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Old 05-17-2015, 06:54 AM
 
Location: where they made the word player hater
214 posts, read 224,868 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ant131531 View Post
No they are not, because then you'd be talking about an urban core as large as NYC. Minneapolis's urban core is not 12 miles wide.

No urban, dense, walkable core is 12 mile long in this country except NYC. It's a bunch of a single family homes between Downtown Minn. and Downtown St Paul. Unless there a streetwall of apartment midrises or rowhouses, it's not an urban core to me.
What?? It is more dense than Atlanta by far.

Back to the point, MSP's urban core is not sprawled out. The neighborhoods are fairly dense by American standards with the exception of the state fairgrounds. The single family homes in this area are on small lots with sidewalks and transit.

Last edited by polo_golf_guy; 05-17-2015 at 07:07 AM..
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Old 05-17-2015, 07:21 AM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
84,957 posts, read 98,776,620 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by steel03 View Post
But you said they were separated by "low density sprawl." There is zero sprawl anywhere between downtown St. Paul and downtown Minneapolis and the entire area is moderate to very high density. What area are you trying to refer to even?
That area is not what anyone would call sprawl, but it's hardly "very high density". It's mostly single family houses (some subdivided into apts) and small apt. buildings in the residential areas.
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